Are adult NP's being phased out, what if you specialize

  1. 0
    Hi all, I am an RN, BSN and have 2 years med surg experience, I am planning on going for an NP. I am unsure of what type of NP to go for though. I was gearing towards adult NP but recently heard they might be phased out, is this true?? What if you are an adult NP and specialize? Would a family NP be a better choice or any other type??

    thanksss
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  3. 10 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    I haven't heard any rumors of the adult NP going away. If that were the case is there really that big of a difference an adult NP and a Family NP?
  5. 0
    Quote from smrn2
    hi all, i am an rn, bsn and have 2 years med surg experience, i am planning on going for an np. i am unsure of what type of np to go for though. i was gearing towards adult np but recently heard they might be phased out, is this true?? what if you are an adult np and specialize? would a family np be a better choice or any other type??

    thanksss






    to those of looking to change careers from rn to apn, or rn to pa, predicting the best path is increasingly difficult.


    here are a couple of links i've posted before here in the forums, that may not answer your question directly, but may add some arrows to your knowledge-quiver. huge study in cooperation with the iom. the first link below may be the most immediately helpful of the two.

    the future of nursing: focus on scope of practice - institute of medicine

    the future of nursing: leading change, advancing health - institute of medicine
  6. 0
    Yes the Adult NP is being "retired". Check the ANCC website: APRN Consensus Model - American Nurses Credentialing Center - ANCC
    . Which certifications will be retired and when?
    The certifications listed below will be retired when their current National Commission for Certifying Agencies (NCCA) accreditation period expires in 2014. Retiring certifications are:
    • Acute Care Nurse Practitioner
    • Adult Nurse Practitioner
    • Adult Psychiatric & Mental Health Nurse Practitioner
    • Gerontological Nurse Practitioner
    • Adult Health Clinical Nurse Specialist
    • Adult Psychiatric & Mental Health Clinical Nurse Specialist
    • Child/Adolescent Psychiatric & Mental Health Clinical Nurse Specialist
    • Gerontological Clinical Nurse Specialist return to top

    10. What will the new certifications be and when will they launch?
    As a result of the APRN Consensus Model implementation in 2015, ANCC will be creating new certifications to meet the role and/or population foci requirements. Planning for these certifications is under way, and we are pleased to announce the expected launch of:
    • Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner [expected launch 2013]
    • Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner [expected launch 2013]
    • Adult-Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist (across the continuum from wellness through acute care)[expected launch 2014]
    ANCC's existing APRN certifications will be updated according to their regular 3-year update cycle to incorporate the requirements of the Consensus Model. These include:
    • Family Nurse Practitioner
    • Pediatric Nurse Practitioner
    • Family Psychiatric & Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (across the life span)
    • Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist (across the continuum from wellness through acute care)
    The process of updating these certifications may also include an evaluation of the title. return to top
  7. 0
    Not a rumor. Fact.
    See post above.
    ANCC (American Nurses Credentialing Center) Consensus Model.

    "If that were the case is there really that big of a difference an adult NP and a Family NP"

    If you don't know the difference in NP specialties, you should not be on this forum.
    Family Practice is known as "womb to tomb"/"cradle to grave" when explaining the population focus.
    Last edit by sailornurse on Mar 23, '12
  8. 0
    I think family NP would be a better choice for you. You will learn how to care for Adults, Geriatrics, and Pediatrics in school. When your done school you will have so many job choices and options. And you can still just do adults when your done your program. My background is pediatrics and im currently in a Pediatric NP program. Sometimes i wish i did family NP because of the job market.
  9. 0
    There is a lot of opportunity to specialize in a content area of your choice after graduation. I think the FNP is the safest bet.
  10. 0
    Quote from sailornurse
    If you don't know the difference in NP specialties, you should not be on this forum.
    Family Practice is known as "womb to tomb"/"cradle to grave" when explaining the population focus.
    Obviously, what I meant was that if the ANP is being phased out, why not go for FNP?
  11. 0
    As an FNP I maybe biased, but I do recommend FNP over PNP or ANP (or the like). Even if you know you never want to lay hands on a(n) _______ (insert adult or child), you may be limiting your job opportunities at time when every opportunity counts. For example, I once worked in an ER that saw adults and kids. Even though the providers did not float to and from the peds section (at least not during the day when it was open) they would not take PNPs because of the chance that an adult could still be placed in that section.

    You will get a well rounded experience, and you never know where your career path will take you. By the way, my first NP job was working in a pediatric ER. They had no issue with me being an FNP versus a PNP. Not sure of others' experience the other way around. Just my .02

    Ivan
  12. 0
    Re: the PNP vs. FNP, some only want to work in a children's facility. I recently heard of a large children's hospital that is giving all of its NP's 5 years before they MUST have their acute care PNP certification. I only know of 1 FNP in my hospital, whereas everyone else is PNPs or NNPs.


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