Acute Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner

  1. The University of Akron is getting an Acute Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Program (I think it just got accredited). I have this feeling this may be too good to be true... so I am just checking.

    This will enable me to work in intensive care units, such as the ER and ICU with kids, right?

    The program states that you will be dual certified in primary care and acute care, so theoretically I could switch it up and work with adults in the ICU as well or work in a pediatricians office?

    The program is three years and length and leads to an MSN and eligibility to sit for both licensing exams.

    It claims to be the second in Ohio and the twelfth nationwide.

    I have checked on their website, but I don't see any information on it yet. I received a mailing on it because I live with a UA alumni.

    Is this too good to be true, or have I found the program I have been looking for?
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   core0
    Quote from foreverLaur
    The University of Akron is getting an Acute Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Program (I think it just got accredited). I have this feeling this may be too good to be true... so I am just checking.

    This will enable me to work in intensive care units, such as the ER and ICU with kids, right?

    The program states that you will be dual certified in primary care and acute care, so theoretically I could switch it up and work with adults in the ICU as well or work in a pediatricians office?

    The program is three years and length and leads to an MSN and eligibility to sit for both licensing exams.

    It claims to be the second in Ohio and the twelfth nationwide.

    I have checked on their website, but I don't see any information on it yet. I received a mailing on it because I live with a UA alumni.

    Is this too good to be true, or have I found the program I have been looking for?
    Can you post a link? I can't find a reference to a Direct entry program. Their Child and Adolescent program looks like a pretty generic primary care program. As far as the dual certification, you are aware that there are two certifications available for PNP's. One is primary care and the other is acute care. I would guess that a dual certification program would certify you in both acute and pediatric care. There are a few ACNP dual certification courses but they are usually FNP/ACNP or ANP/ACNP. The issue that I see with a PNP/ACNP program is keeping up with the adult and pediatrics for certification.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
  4. by   foreverLaur
    Quote from core0
    Can you post a link? I can't find a reference to a Direct entry program. Their Child and Adolescent program looks like a pretty generic primary care program. As far as the dual certification, you are aware that there are two certifications available for PNP's. One is primary care and the other is acute care. I would guess that a dual certification program would certify you in both acute and pediatric care. There are a few ACNP dual certification courses but they are usually FNP/ACNP or ANP/ACNP. The issue that I see with a PNP/ACNP program is keeping up with the adult and pediatrics for certification.

    David Carpenter, PA-C

    It isn't on their website yet. I read it in "The University of Akron Magazine for Alumni & Friends." I'll type out what it says.

    "The College of Nursing has joined an elite group of schools offering an Acute Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner program, certified by the Pediatric Nursing Practitioner program. The board approved the college's newest program in June, making it the only certified program of its kind in Northeast Ohio, one of two in Ohio, and one of 12 nationwide. Piloted in 2007, the 55-credit hour/900 clinical hours dual acute care and primary care master's program prepares pediatric nurse practitioners to meet the needs of children with complex acute and chronic health conditions. Professionals may practice in intensive care environments, including critical care and emergency rooms, specialty office practices or clinics, as well as in rehabilitation and early intervention programs."

    The article also states that is a need for acute care pediatric nurse practitioners both regionally and nationally. It says that there are not many certified acute care PNPs in Ohio and that it has been heavily requested. The program was collaboratively made between the University of Akron and physicians/PNPs at Akron Children's Hospital.

    It is just like any other MSN program that requires 1 year critical care experience, a BSN, and certified as an RN to enter the program. It is three years in length.




    So, do you end up certified as a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner AND an Acute Care Nurse Practitioner orrr are you a PNP who is dual certified in Acute Care and Primary Care, meaning you could not do Acute Care with adults?
  5. by   core0
    Quote from foreverLaur
    It isn't on their website yet. I read it in "The University of Akron Magazine for Alumni & Friends." I'll type out what it says.

    "The College of Nursing has joined an elite group of schools offering an Acute Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner program, certified by the Pediatric Nursing Practitioner program. The board approved the college's newest program in June, making it the only certified program of its kind in Northeast Ohio, one of two in Ohio, and one of 12 nationwide. Piloted in 2007, the 55-credit hour/900 clinical hours dual acute care and primary care master's program prepares pediatric nurse practitioners to meet the needs of children with complex acute and chronic health conditions. Professionals may practice in intensive care environments, including critical care and emergency rooms, specialty office practices or clinics, as well as in rehabilitation and early intervention programs."

    The article also states that is a need for acute care pediatric nurse practitioners both regionally and nationally. It says that there are not many certified acute care PNPs in Ohio and that it has been heavily requested. The program was collaboratively made between the University of Akron and physicians/PNPs at Akron Children's Hospital.

    It is just like any other MSN program that requires 1 year critical care experience, a BSN, and certified as an RN to enter the program. It is three years in length.

    So, do you end up certified as a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner AND an Acute Care Nurse Practitioner orrr are you a PNP who is dual certified in Acute Care and Primary Care, meaning you could not do Acute Care with adults?
    I would say the second. If you are doing both ACNP and PNP you would need a lot more clinical hours to get both certifications. The parts I bolded do not mention any kind of adult training. The PNCB differentiates between primary care and acute care. Interestingly the ANCC does not differentiate. While some most states are not requiring acute care certifications many hospitals are requiring them as part of the re-credentialing process.

    Here is the FAQ on the differences between acute and primary care PNP.
    https://www.pncb.org/ptistore/control/exams/ac/faq

    David Carpenter, PA-C
  6. by   foreverLaur
    Quote from core0
    I would say the second. If you are doing both ACNP and PNP you would need a lot more clinical hours to get both certifications. The parts I bolded do not mention any kind of adult training. The PNCB differentiates between primary care and acute care. Interestingly the ANCC does not differentiate. While some most states are not requiring acute care certifications many hospitals are requiring them as part of the re-credentialing process.

    Here is the FAQ on the differences between acute and primary care PNP.
    https://www.pncb.org/ptistore/control/exams/ac/faq

    David Carpenter, PA-C

    I know I want to work in a hospital in a more critical care/busy environment and I would prefer to work with kids, so this seemed like the perfect program with me. I considered becoming just an acute care PNP or a Neonatal NP as well. It just seems that his program will allow me to do what I want: work with kids in a critical care environment.
  7. by   ICRN2008
    I would do some careful research on employment prospects in your area before committing to a PNP program of any kind. I know many PNPs in my area who are not practicing because there just aren't enough jobs. A dual certification in acute and primary care would boost your resume to be sure, but consider the fact that in the end the additional time in school may not lead to a job...

    I also recommend getting some experience in peds as a RN before you consider transitioning to the PNP role. This way, you will be able to observe the NPs in your organization directly and have perhaps have the opportunity to shadow a few of them. By doing this, I was able to figure out that I don't want to work in the inpatient setting. I would never have guessed this before spending time with the NPs on the inpatient oncology unit.
  8. by   foreverLaur
    I volunteer on the general medicine/pulmonary floor of a children's hospital, so hopefully that will give me some insight as I interact with both doctors and nurses on a daily basis. I really want to be an acute care nurse practitioner but the schools in my area don't offer that program. I like the idea of being able to work in a hospital (my #1 choice) but be able to transition to an office role to have more normal hours for the first years after starting a family.

    I absolutely LOVE the NICU, but I got bored being in there all the time because the premies don't talk back to you. I much prefer the ICU type hospital environment vs an office setting as well. I like to be busy and I like the more trauma/critical care type of things (don't take that the wrong way though!!!)
  9. by   meandragonbrett
    I believe this program is a Pediatric Acute Care Nurse Practitioner. There is a specialty certification exam . I know that Duke and Emory are two of the schools that offer the program. The specialty is still in its infancy.

    As far as the dual certification...it would be so that you can provide chronic and acute care to the pediatric population, not adult and peds population.
  10. by   b-girl
    Quote from foreverLaur
    So, do you end up certified as a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner AND an Acute Care Nurse Practitioner orrr are you a PNP who is dual certified in Acute Care and Primary Care, meaning you could not do Acute Care with adults?
    it sounds like the program allows you to be eligible to sit for both the PNP-PC (primary care) and PNP-AC (acute care) certification exams, upon completion..

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