2015 DNP Requirement for APNs - page 4

by IcanHealYou

37,656 Unique Views | 81 Comments

Hey everyone, Is it true that all NPs and other APNs will have to finish off their DNP in order to achieve NP status after 2015? I'm currently applying for FNP school and I'm getting worried about this. I may or may not... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from kalevra
    How about mandating that all APN programs require the Rn to actually have a year or two of work experience before they are eligible to apply. By work experience I mean paid work experience in the capacity of an RN. The part time job you held at the pizza place while an undergrad does not count towards your APN program.

    I just find it strange that you can be an Advanced Practice Nurse without ever having experience working as an RN. I found a description of UIC Graduate Entry Program for Advanced Nurse Practitioners.
    CRNAs have required a year or more of acute/critical care experience prior to going to nurse anesthesia school for a long time now.
    The only problem requiring experience is that there is no studies that show it helps students to have that experience, and too much experience between the time a student starts graduate school has been shown to be positive indicator for poor academic performance.
  2. 1
    CRNAs requiring ICU experience for at least 1 year makes sense. They have to be really good at monitoring a patients status in the OR. The ICU floor with their highly acute patients that are close to death is a great place to hone those skills. Some things are learned under the pressure of real life.

    As for having too much time working between your BSN to CRNA transition, how about going back to school after getting that one year ICU. It allows the RN to gain real world experience and not too far out of academia that they cannot perform to a satisfactory level.

    I mean I just find it strange that our profession can completely skip actual "nursing" in order to advance their own "nursing" career". Its not like we spend thousands of hours at clinical honing our skills before we are responsible for the life of 4 patients. Nursing school is not the same kind of pressure as the real world.




    Just my own opinion on the matter.
    Kaligirl02 likes this.
  3. 1
    Quote from kalevra
    CRNAs requiring ICU experience for at least 1 year makes sense. They have to be really good at monitoring a patients status in the OR. The ICU floor with their highly acute patients that are close to death is a great place to hone those skills. Some things are learned under the pressure of real life.

    As for having too much time working between your BSN to CRNA transition, how about going back to school after getting that one year ICU. It allows the RN to gain real world experience and not too far out of academia that they cannot perform to a satisfactory level.

    I mean I just find it strange that our profession can completely skip actual "nursing" in order to advance their own "nursing" career". Its not like we spend thousands of hours at clinical honing our skills before we are responsible for the life of 4 patients. Nursing school is not the same kind of pressure as the real world.




    Just my own opinion on the matter.
    I agree that all APNs should have at least a couple of years experience before going back to school or at least be working full time while going to school to gain experience while in school, but the reality is that there isn't any research that I know of that supports this.
    PMFB-RN likes this.
  4. 1
    The only study done on the subject found that RN experience did not contribute to NP competency. I know many on this website think that their personal pathway is the only viable one, but direct entry programs are not exactly new (mine is over 20 years old) and graduates make excellent NPs. I don't understand why nursing as a field can be so myopic sometimes. Bringing in people from other fields to become NPs, as long as they get rigorous training, seems to be working very well.
    kalevra likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from myelin
    The only study done on the subject found that RN experience did not contribute to NP competency. I know many on this website think that their personal pathway is the only viable one, but direct entry programs are not exactly new (mine is over 20 years old) and graduates make excellent NPs. I don't understand why nursing as a field can be so myopic sometimes. Bringing in people from other fields to become NPs, as long as they get rigorous training, seems to be working very well.
    Really? Would you mind sending me a link to the study, I would love to read it.
  6. 2
    Thank you for posting this. The scope of practice for RNs and NPs are not the same. The training is also very different. There are studies out there to prove this, just look it up yourself. I totally agreed, RN experience is good if it is applicable to your specialty of practice. I can see how would it be beneficial for a NP who works in the acute care setting to have hospital RN experience. However, as for primary care NPs, I don't think it's necessary. I don't want to get into the argument of PA and NP training, which has been debated over the last decade on various blogs. If PAs can do it w/o nursing experience why not APRNs?

    As a primary care NP, I do not want to manage MI, trach/NG tubes, IV, CRNA, lumbar puncture, DKA etc.. It's not in my scope of practice period. I am happy seeing patients in ambulatory care. Most RNs who work in the acute care setting have a hard time transitioning to outpatient care model when they are in NP school. We don't always have the whistles and bells like you do in the hospital. If that is your cup of tea, by all means get your CRNA and ACNP and stay in the hospital setting. DNP is totally a different subject that I don't think is necessarily for NPs, unless it includes residency and fellowship.
    Last edit by takotsubo82 on Mar 5, '13
    myelin and TashaLPN2006RN2012 like this.
  7. 0
    Quote from takotsubo82
    what I would like to see is more residencies and fellowships being offered to new grad NPs like me. I think that will come in the years to come when the healthcare act kicks in next year in 2012.
    I so agree! I hope you're right, takotsubo82, that they are coming. It's great to have schooling to a point but as an NP hopeful, what I'd really like is more hands-on experience with mentoring.
    Last edit by scwolf on Mar 17, '13 : Reason: clari
  8. 0
    I've said it before, I'll say it again. I was a critical care nurse for over 20 years before going back to school. It hasn't made an iota of difference in my FNP practice. I had a slight advantage in school over classmates that didn't already know normal labs values and a cardiac assessment inside and out, but the playing field was more than leveled by the time we were six weeks in. RN and APN practice is simply so utterly different that RN experience lends almost zero to APN practice. No one wants to believe that 20 years of their life was wasted, lol, but there you have it. It doesn't mean a hill of beans for what I do now. Meaningless. I could have been selling cars, and I'd still be a novice NP, just as I am now, with less than 4 years experience. Having been a nurse for all those years doesn't make me any less a novice NP now. It makes me a novice NP who was a nurse instead of a car salesman. And that means squat. Thems the facts, and that's that.

    What I got out of it, which I may also have gotten from selling cars, is that I know how to "deal" with people, I take abuse from no one, and I am very comfortable with people from all walks of life. I will coddle them if necessary, or calmly throw them out on their ear if necessary. I can do tough love, and can do good cop/bad cop, I can listen well, smile when I hate their guts, and I have a perfect poker face. I also have a keen sense of smell. That's about it. I am not a better NP for any of that. I am a wiser adult because I'm not 30 years old, and I'm not impulsive anymore, but no, not a better NP.
  9. 1
    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    What I got out of it, which I may also have gotten from selling cars, is that I know how to "deal" with people, I take abuse from no one, and I am very comfortable with people from all walks of life. I will coddle them if necessary, or calmly throw them out on their ear if necessary. I can do tough love, and can do good cop/bad cop, I can listen well, smile when I hate their guts, and I have a perfect poker face. I also have a keen sense of smell. That's about it. I am not a better NP for any of that. I am a wiser adult because I'm not 30 years old, and I'm not impulsive anymore, but no, not a better NP.
    MY hospital has NP students from two different programs doing clinicals. One if a direct entry masters program where the students have not RN experience. the other is a DNP NP program that requires 2 years or more of RN practice. I notice one big difference between them.
    The direct entry grads all fawn over the physicians and never question any diagnosis or order the resident gives. The DNP students DO question the physicians (all residents at night) when the order don't make sence. I think the direct entry NP students never learned that physicians, especialy residents, DO make mistakes and DO give inappropiate orders and MUST be questioned when they do so.
    Due to my position as full time rapid response RN and the relationship I have with our attending physicians I often get a "heads up" about certain residents who will be covering the night shift from the attending physicians. Don't get me wrong, most of the residents are very smart and a majority are really good, but a few are not and I usually get a heads up when those who concern the attending are coming on for their two weeks of night shift cross cover duty. The NP students also do night shift for a few weeks and I see their interaction with patients and residents.
    SycamoreGuy likes this.
  10. 1
    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    I've said it before, I'll say it again. I was a critical care nurse for over 20 years before going back to school. It hasn't made an iota of difference in my FNP practice. I had a slight advantage in school over classmates that didn't already know normal labs values and a cardiac assessment inside and out, but the playing field was more than leveled by the time we were six weeks in. RN and APN practice is simply so utterly different that RN experience lends almost zero to APN practice. No one wants to believe that 20 years of their life was wasted, lol, but there you have it. It doesn't mean a hill of beans for what I do now. Meaningless. I could have been selling cars, and I'd still be a novice NP, just as I am now, with less than 4 years experience. Having been a nurse for all those years doesn't make me any less a novice NP now. It makes me a novice NP who was a nurse instead of a car salesman. And that means squat. Thems the facts, and that's that.

    What I got out of it, which I may also have gotten from selling cars, is that I know how to "deal" with people, I take abuse from no one, and I am very comfortable with people from all walks of life. I will coddle them if necessary, or calmly throw them out on their ear if necessary. I can do tough love, and can do good cop/bad cop, I can listen well, smile when I hate their guts, and I have a perfect poker face. I also have a keen sense of smell. That's about it. I am not a better NP for any of that. I am a wiser adult because I'm not 30 years old, and I'm not impulsive anymore, but no, not a better NP.
    Thanks for your honesty, I think I am beginning to see your perspective on the issue.

    So in application, if new grads cant find jobs right after getting their BSN, they should instead go into NP. This way they get ahead of the curve, they get their NP right around when Obama care takes full effect and millions of people need primary care providers. Many of whom will be NPs/PAs.

    Makes sense.
    Kaligirl02 likes this.


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