How do RN's become massage therapists? - page 3

by lyv33

I am interested in doing massage therapy and I am a RN. I lack 3 classes before completing my BSN also, but just am not satisfied with doing nursing any longer. I have been doing case management for the last few years and it is... Read More


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    Quote from davidcrn69
    maybe I'm way wrong; so in essence, having just a plain ol' RN license now is like having a H.S. diploma in nursing. It just doesn't mean as much..unless one tacks on one expensive cert or degree after another. Why not then lobby the
    ANA or whoever to mandate education in specialies from the start? It's cool. I have since tacked on a couple of certs to my RN title and don't mind (CEN, MDS coordinator, BLS instructor, ACLS, PALS). But I feel I learned the most in nursing school and reading on my own. I bet you do give a great massage. Hope you keep up your other knowledge, to be flexible and marketable in this dicey economy we now have!

    In order to maintain my license in the state of Illinois as a massage therapist we need 48 CEU'S per 2 years, while nursing is only required to have 20 per 2 years....Hmmmm extreme you might think for "just a massage therapist" so I also make myself very much in demand with continuing education. Not only am I a Certified Childbirth Educator and NALS certified, I'm also certified in perinatal massage, infant massage and an instructor, bamboo massage certified, oncology massage certified and a certified breast massage therapist for our breast cancer patients. I have a lot of modalities to offer. So no David for once you are right! pursuing further education especially in nursing is a must but you have to gear it to your interest or specialty. I believe some states have what is called Advance Practice Nurses who are masters prepared. I'm not interested! I went with my heart and soul and was not interested in this area. Believe me I was not prepared for the expense of this license as compared to my nursing license upkeep. The cost is absurd to say the least. National certification 200.00/ 2yrs, the license alone for the state is 175.00/ 2yrs. plus all the continuing ed classes which are intensive and average 450.00 to 650.00 each for the above ones I took. Needless to say I was a tiny bit taken aback so thank you for bringing this up. For those of you interested please look into what it will cost you to maintain your license as each state is different. Thanks David for your input.
  2. 0
    Quote from massageRN
    The cost is absurd to say the least. National certification 200.00/ 2yrs, the license alone for the state is 175.00/ 2yrs. plus all the continuing ed classes which are intensive and average 450.00 to 650.00 each for the above ones I took. Needless to say I was a tiny bit taken aback so thank you for bringing this up. For those of you interested please look into what it will cost you to maintain your license as each state is different. Thanks David for your input.
    Hi!

    Just wanted to point out regarding the above post about costs: as a licensed or certified massage therapist, ALL costs for maintaining certifications, licensing renewals, personal liability insurance, background checks, fingerprinting, and all continuing educations (after meeting the minimum standards for your state) are TAX WRITE-OFFS as long as you document, keep receipts, and file properly. Even the cost of massage oils, essential oils, and mileage on your care driving to a clients house is a deduction. My favorite deduction is the cost of receiving a massage from other therapists (this is considered "Research and Development.") We learned all about this in our "Business for Bodyworkers" class, and it was absolutely fantastic to find out!!! If you're working as an RN, you would have to file separate return (1099 MISC) for your massage business as an independent contractor. SO worth it. All those costs are completely and legally neutralized.

    A word of caution: I'm certain the above information applies for massage therapists in California. It might be a good idea to hire an accountant who specialized in small business management to help you get your deductions sorted specific to your states laws about massage therapy. (The costs of the accountant would be a tax write-off too)
    Last edit by touchhealth on Nov 17, '09
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    Hi, I know it's been a while since your original post but I was wondering if you made the move into massage therapy? I'm also a nurse who has gone to school for massage therapy. I live in the state of New York, which requires 1000 hours of training. Ideally, I would love to leave nursing, but that pays the bills. The therapists that ultimately make the most $$ are those in their own business, hiring others to do most of the work. Currently I work at a gym doing massage in my spare time. The clients generally call me directly and we work out the time schedule. Having only 3 classes left for your BSN, if that were me, I'd finish that up....even one class at a time you'd eventually finish. I'm still a full time nurse. I do wish you best, but was curious as to where you were in the process.
  4. 0
    I'm getting ready to make this move myself. I'm a BSN with a critical care background. I just bailed out of anesthesia school because I came to realize that I really didn't *want* to be doing that kind of high pressure stuff the rest of my career. I'm going to start massage school in a little over a month, and am really looking forward to it. Now I just need a job so I can pay bills... Certainly the money won't be CRNA kind of money, but I'm not interested in getting rich anyway. A more laid back, lower stress life is what I'm after. I figure massage will be a pretty good way to do that.
  5. 0
    Quote from Nurse.M.T
    Hello,
    All you need to do is enter a Massage Therapy Program of at least 500hrs.
    I am a LPN and recently graduated from the Massage Therapy program here in Charleston SC.. I went to trident technical college. I have been a nurse for 2 years and I new almost right away that nursing want something that I wanted to to for the rest of my life. I didnt even know that there was a such thing a as N.M.T until I found the NANMT! I am in the process of starting my own business. I love alternative health care!
    Nice, I also am a LPN and do massage in a PT department. Our Physical therapist trained me.
    I do massage, ROM, and Myofascial Release on post op pt's.
    It did not cost me an extra 8 grand, and I love what I do.
    No I do not get $60 an hour for massage, but $25 an hr. is good for a LPN.
  6. 0
    Quote from amant
    Nice, I also am a LPN and do massage in a PT department. Our Physical therapist trained me.
    I do massage, ROM, and Myofascial Release on post op pt's.
    It did not cost me an extra 8 grand, and I love what I do.
    No I do not get $60 an hour for massage, but $25 an hr. is good for a LPN.
    As my friend above stated, many nurses perform bodywork and health care. And as I have worked with him in Physical Therapy, I can atest to his knowledge and skill.

    I have however completed a 500 hr course and feel that a nurse can move beyond work in PT.
    I have opened my own Holistic wellness office and do Medical Massage, Acupressure and Reflexology.
    I am vary happy I took the course, but I certainly feel it is a little excessive for nurses.
  7. 0
    Hi... I am a certified massage therapist now but doing my pre reqs for nursing. Does anyone knows how that works for me? Is it just like being a massgae therapist... can anyone help me? Thank you
  8. 0
    Quote from harroldnd
    Hi... I am a certified massage therapist now but doing my pre reqs for nursing. Does anyone knows how that works for me? Is it just like being a massgae therapist... can anyone help me? Thank you
    Well I actually was (well I am) a licensed massaged therapist, now I'm also a registered nurse! Going to nursing school is nothing like going too school for massage therapy! You may find your pre req courses....ok A&P a little easier to understand and follow than some one who has not. I'm not sure if that answered your question?!? I do feel that nursing is a natural career pathway for a massage therapist, you won't feel weird about being in someones personal space.... AND YOU WILL be in those spaces
  9. 0
    Quote from lyv33
    I am interested in doing massage therapy and I am a RN. I lack 3 classes before completing my BSN also, but just am not satisfied with doing nursing any longer. I have been doing case management for the last few years and it is extremely boring. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    I do both. I was a massage therapist 1st then I went to nursing school! I LOVE what I do. I make really good money as a postpartum nurse and in my off times charge 75$ for an hour and 90$ for and hour and a half. Plus since I work for myself I keep everything I make. Which is the only way I suggest to do it. If you work for one of these companies like massage envy, you make no money! Go for it and you might want to leave case management alone! If your bored at your job and your a nurse, something is really wrong
  10. 0
    i'm an LPN and going for my massage therapy license. i work full time work and i'm in school full time
    it all depends on where you live NONE of my 95 hours of a&p were credited towards school so i have to take 150 hours of a&p
    and i'm learning new things every day. there are specialties available as a nurse therapist, and you can specialize in one modality
    if you do it right the potential is there to make six figures. check out the links below they should help

    NANMT Nurse Massage Therapists | Hands-On Healing | Welcome!
    http://www.americanmedicalmassage.com/
    http://www.amtamassage.org
    Massage Magazine exploring today's touch therapieshttp://www.massagetoday.com/mpacms/mt/article.php?id=14547
    http://www.nysmassage.org/
    http://www.mmpa.us/faq.htm
    http://nccam.nih.gov/health/massage







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