worth it?

  1. I have only been an RN for 1.5 years. A year at my current hospital system. I like most of it. I am confident in my skills, but still consider myself new. I was offered a chance to interview for an assistant manager position. Not sure if this is something that I want....but I think I will do the interview. My manager thinks I will do well...but I'm not so sure of myself. I have many years of management experience at a national drug chain. I don't think I am the strongest nurse...but no one else want's it. I'm not sure I do either. Yes, it looks great on a resume...but I don't plan on leaving the system. It's salary...but I would make more with 8 hrs. OT at my current rate. what do you think?
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   traumaRUs
    I think you have said it yourself - no one else wants the job. Hmmm - I take that as a bad sign. I think it speaks volumes that none of the more experienced nurses want it.
  4. by   staceyp413
    PLEASE NOTE, while you want to have a comperable salary, no matter what the amount is, your wages will never equal the amount of time and some days headaches that management can involve. :spin:

    You should interview and look into it if you are interested in: developing your unit, helping to problem solve, making your unit a great place to work, being a patient advocate, being your staff's advocate, and also trying to be the facilities advocate:spin:

    The best advice that I can give is that if you are new to management, make sure the person who will be "guiding" you and helping to develop your skills is someone that you look up to and admire. Management can be a very rewarding career but you need to be aware of the 'pains' it can bring as well.

    Good luck no matter what you decide!!
  5. by   llg
    You should probably interview for the position and use the opportunity to ask all of our questions and to stimulate you to do some long term career planning.

    Nurses don't do enough career planning. Most tend to look at their current situation without much thought about the long term. What type of career do you want long term? What are your plans for when you are 60 years old and have bad knees ... and a bad back ... etc.? What types of jobs will you be wanting in the future? What types of things should you be doing now to prepare for those future jobs?

    There is absolutely nothing wrong with being a bedside staff nurse for your entire career. If that's what you want -- and you are blessed with the good health to do that -- then that's a wonderful career to have. The options to work overtime and to get differentials by working "off-shifts" and holidays give staff nurses the ability to make more money than many nurses in advanced practice roles.

    However, you owe it to yourself to at least explore the other possibilities with an open mind. You might decide that this particular management position is not right for you at this time -- or you might decide that it is. But either way, the exploration would probably be good for you.

    llg
  6. by   ebony2
    Quote from llg
    You should probably interview for the position and use the opportunity to ask all of our questions and to stimulate you to do some long term career planning.

    Nurses don't do enough career planning. Most tend to look at their current situation without much thought about the long term. What type of career do you want long term? What are your plans for when you are 60 years old and have bad knees ... and a bad back ... etc.? What types of jobs will you be wanting in the future? What types of things should you be doing now to prepare for those future jobs?

    There is absolutely nothing wrong with being a bedside staff nurse for your entire career. If that's what you want -- and you are blessed with the good health to do that -- then that's a wonderful career to have. The options to work overtime and to get differentials by working "off-shifts" and holidays give staff nurses the ability to make more money than many nurses in advanced practice roles.

    However, you owe it to yourself to at least explore the other possibilities with an open mind. You might decide that this particular management position is not right for you at this time -- or you might decide that it is. But either way, the exploration would probably be good for you.

    llg

    Maybe looking at what makes you high on nursing will help with your decision. Is it the comforting of another through listening. relieving their pain. teaching them about thier disease processes and how it will impact thier lives? Are you more interested in improving and evaluating the way things are currently done. Does improving efficiency while keeping quality intact peek your interests? Nursing is steeped in diversity, and with 1.5 yrs.exp. have your given yourself time to know what is out there for you? "No one else wanting to do it, "...........Is that a valid enough reason for you to want to.? You have previous management experience in your other field, so the shock will not be too overwhelming. You have good skills they can only improve over time and upward mobility is always there for those who qualify and what to expand upon their responsibilies. Just a few things to think about. Good Luck
  7. by   ebony2
    [quote=ebony2]Maybe looking at what makes you high on nursing will help with your decision. Is it the comforting of another through listening. relieving their pain. teaching them about thier disease processes and how it will impact thier lives? Are you more interested in improving and evaluating the way things are currently done. Does improving efficiency while keeping quality intact peek your interests? Nursing is steeped in diversity, and with 1.5 yrs.exp. have your given yourself time to know what is out there for you? "No one else wanting to do it, "...........Is that a valid enough reason for you to want to.? You have previous management experience in your other field, so the shock will not be too overwhelming. You have good skills they can only improve over time and upward mobility is always there for those who qualify and what to expand upon their responsibilies. Just a few things to think about. Good Luck
  8. by   ebony2
    [quote=ebony2]Maybe looking at what makes you high on nursing will help with your decision. Is it the comforting of another through listening. relieving their pain. teaching them about thier disease processes and how it will impact thier lives? Are you more interested in improving and evaluating the way things are currently done. Does improving efficiency while keeping quality intact peek your interests? Nursing is steeped in diversity, and with 1.5 yrs.exp. have your given yourself time to know what is out there for you? "No one else wanting to do it, "...........Is that a valid enough reason for you to want to.? You have previous management experience in your other field, so the shock will not be too overwhelming. You have good skills they can only improve over time and upward mobility is always there for those who qualify and what to expand upon their responsibilies. Just a few things to think about. Good Luck in whatever you decide to do.
  9. by   dragonflyRN
    I guess I care too much in general. I love being a bedside nurse, accepting this position does not mean I can't be. I can for 4-8 hours in any given shift plus any OT I decide to pick up. This management position sparks my interest only because I am from a customer service background. My head is running with ideas to make our unit better, for the patient's and the nurses. It has been..since I started in this system. I now have the oppurtunity to implement some changes. Some are small...some are big. I will do the interview. Thanks....I appreciate the insite.

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