How many are you responsible for?

  1. Question:

    What is a reasonable number of personnel for a Nursing Manager to be responsible for?

    The manager I am asking about is responsible for 2 interrelated units - one of which is a specialty intensive care unit.

    The census/acuity of these units varies widely - even from day-to-day. One day staff are being called off/sent home and the budget is adversely affected by low census; and the next day can bring a need for overtime and budgetary concerns because of that.

    This manager also works in a geographical area where the clientele is for the most part educated and exacting and there are more than the usual (compared to other places I've been) problems with family members' demands.

    This manager was working for at least 4 hours yesterday (Saturday) on a problem (error committed by a CNA) and comes in day or night whenever there is a crisis.

    There is no assistant manager, the charge nurses rotate and are only responsible for their shift.

    So, how many are you responsible for and what do you think is the upper limit?

    Thanks in advance for any and all info.
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   kids
    My environment is very different...high tech Peds PDN:

    4 unskilled cases (severe autism or sz, mod. CP)
    12 skilled cases, 10 trached, 8 with some sort of vent support, all have GTs.

    Plus I have an additional 4 cases that I do weekly visits on.

    I have 30 Nurses and 5 CNAs.

    We are budgeted for 32 hrs/week. I am responsable and oncall 24/7. My "assistant" is a Staffing Coord. with no medical background (who fortunately is very smart and has picked up a lot in the 9 years she has been doing this).

    I 'worked' 110 hours last pay period...my time card says 80.
  4. by   lchristi
    I work on pediatric oncology unit where there are 36 beds. Our organizational structure is as follows: One director, two nurse managers, and six clinical coordinators. We have a total of 200 employees that we all are responsible for . They include RNs, secretaries, and NCAs. Our clinical coordinators are responsible for the day to day operations such as bed assignments, census updates,staffing, handling conflict on the unit, as well as clinical updates for the staff. We are also have a unit educator that is specific for our unit. Our managers and the director are rarely consulted during off shifts. I guess we should consider ourselves lucky.
  5. by   nell
    Thank you kids-r-fun and lchristi for your responses.

    My manager is soley responsible for 109 employees between the 2 units. There are no assistant mgrs. in any way shape or form.

    I am afraid the workload is killing her...
  6. by   Mattigan
    Originally posted by nell
    My manager is soley responsible for 109 employees between the 2 units. There are no assistant mgrs. in any way shape or form.

    Certainly makes ME feel better about MY situation.
  7. by   mageean
    I manage a service for Older poeple with mental health needs which covers 3 main hospital sites and a number of stand alone units over an approx area of 800 square miles. I have the support of 4 local manager/clinicians and a total of 340+ nursing staff. I deeply regret that the pressures of the job mean I do not get to meet some staff for some considerable time and some I cant even remember their names at time!!
  8. by   PediRN
    I manage a pedi rehab unit; 40 RNs, 7 NAs and a unit secretary. Just finished those performance appraisals.
  9. by   rrroyer
    I'm the director of a Nursing Administration department. Under me I have 2 secretaries, 2 staffing clerks and 4 House Supervisors. I have a full time float pool of about 50 RNs, LPNs and CNAs. I'm also over 160 per diem employees non benefited who work from 32hrs/month to full time hours. Just doing the monthly evaluations is overwelming. When I have unit meetings I have to reserve the auditorium. Lucky for me most of my staff love me and are very patient.
  10. by   Loquax
    I'm the assistant manager at a pediatric oncology ward at a mid-sized university hospital in Sweden. We (me and my boss) have something about 30 people at our ward, not including physicans but including the secretaries and the Swedish equivalent to LPNs ('barnskterskor'). I'ts a fairly small staff if you compare with other wards at our hospital.
  11. by   RNPATL
    I have a 40 bed combined Medical & Surgical unit and supervise and manager over 60 employees (RN, LPN, CNA and Secretaries). Most days I can keep up, but if I fall behind on anything, it takes me weeks to get back on target. I am the sole manager for this unit, which means that I am resonsible for all aspects of the units management. It can be a tough and overwhelming job, but it can also be very rewarding .... I am waiting for the rewarding part.
  12. by   Celia M
    Wow, I am so lucky!! I manage an 8 bedded ICU (average census 3) and have sole responsiblity for the running of the unit and 12 staff. I also staff prn, (probably once a month) and cover for meal breaks when at work. I am also on several committees and involved in hospitalwide QA/QI projects
  13. by   RNPATL
    Quote from Celia M
    Wow, I am so lucky!! I manage an 8 bedded ICU (average census 3) and have sole responsiblity for the running of the unit and 12 staff. I also staff prn, (probably once a month) and cover for meal breaks when at work. I am also on several committees and involved in hospitalwide QA/QI projects
    That is great..... somedays my staffing issues are all that I can deal with. I bet it is nice to have the time to be on committees and set up programs so your unit runs in high efficiency with great care!

    I am very proud of where my unit has come from and continues to grow. Much of this success is due to the nurses that are willing and wanting an environment that provides great care.

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