Bypass the Nurse Recruiter?

  1. Seeking management view on my situation. I'm a BSN CCRN with 10 years ICU experience, started in ICU as a new grad way back when when they were not hiring new grads directly into ICU. I did not have a formal internship, I had a preceptor for 6 weeks and then I was on my own. I feel like I have accomplished all that I set out to accomplish in ICU and now I'd like to move on and change specialties. I've applied at a fairly small hospital (lots of deliveries though) in their Level II Nursery. The recruiter contacted me and said that I was not a candidate for the Nursery position since I lack NICU experience and they do not do internships. She all but begged for me to interview for her open ICU positions. The Nursery position has been open for weeks and she admits that they are very short staffed (another reason they are seeking experience, I'm sure). I have thought about contacting the Nurse Manager of the Nursery directly, forwarding her my CV, and asking for an interview. I am an extremely motivated, responsible, and a self directed learner. I succeeded (shone!) as a new grad with an extremely limited amount of training, and really think I could learn quickly In the Nursery as well. Any opinions? Thanks.
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   suzanne4
    Why would you need to use a recruiter? Definitely bypass them if you have an American passport. They are convenient for getting paperwork and immigration things done if you are form overseas, but if you don't need a visa? You can make the calls yourself, instead of through a middle man and get a better offer. Remember, recruiters do not work for free, so part of what you would be getting would be going to them.

    Good luck
  4. by   Renee' Y-Y
    If you can get to the manager...go for it...just be prepared for pay cut because your experience is not in pediatrics.
  5. by   IamRN
    Quote from suzanne4
    why would you need to use a recruiter? definitely bypass them if you have an american passport. they are convenient for getting paperwork and immigration things done if you are form overseas, but if you don't need a visa? you can make the calls yourself, instead of through a middle man and get a better offer. remember, recruiters do not work for free, so part of what you would be getting would be going to them.

    good luck
    i think she is referring to hospital based nurse recruiters. these individuals only deal w/recruiting to that specific hospital. they are usually the first people that a prospective employee talks to in the organization. the ones that i have worked w/enable interviews w/those positions that you may be interested and/or qualified to work in.
  6. by   my2sons
    Right. I'm in America, just trying to change specialties. Recruiter is hospital based, but it wouldn't suprise me if they are on some kind of bonus incentive to fill vacant spots. It is very frustrating, in my 18 bed SICU we take care of extremely sick sick people, but they dont't think twice about hiring new grads with zero hospital/ICU experience. If you have a license and a pulse, you're hired!
  7. by   llg
    To my2sons: You are in a delicate position and your appreciation of the politics here is admirable. I think the key is to get your information to the nurse manager of the nursery without offending the recruiters. You wouldn't want to make enemies within the hospital before you even get the job you want!

    Is there any way for you to network with the manager of the unit you are interested in?

    For example: Do you know anyone who works in that unit or who knows the manager who could make a discrete inquiry for you? Such a person could say something about "having a friend who is interested, but who was turned away by the recruiters because of a lack of nursery experience... how should my friend go about changing specialties?" etc. etc.

    If you have no such friend ... is there a way to meet anyone from the nursery? ... a local professional conference? ... a professional organization? ... etc.

    If you can think of no way to establish a connection through a less formal contact, then I would simply write a polite letter to the manager asking for career advice. Seek what career experts call an "informational interview" as opposed to a "job interview." Your letter should explain you situation and then state that you have learned through the recruiters that the nursery only hires people with previous experience. You are seeking to talk with the manager to learn how you might go about getting the necessary experience to be considered for such a job. If the manager is impressed with you, she might just offer you the job. If she really wants to stick to her guns and only hire peope with previous nursery experience, she will probablly be willing to point you in the right direction to get that experience. Either way, by requesting the "informational interview" rather than the "job interview," you run far less risk of offending the recruiters -- and why make enemies unnecessarily?

    Good luck,
    llg
  8. by   irishrose53
    Quote from llg
    To my2sons: You are in a delicate position and your appreciation of the politics here is admirable. I think the key is to get your information to the nurse manager of the nursery without offending the recruiters. You wouldn't want to make enemies within the hospital before you even get the job you want!

    Is there any way for you to network with the manager of the unit you are interested in?

    For example: Do you know anyone who works in that unit or who knows the manager who could make a discrete inquiry for you? Such a person could say something about "having a friend who is interested, but who was turned away by the recruiters because of a lack of nursery experience... how should my friend go about changing specialties?" etc. etc.

    If you have no such friend ... is there a way to meet anyone from the nursery? ... a local professional conference? ... a professional organization? ... etc.

    If you can think of no way to establish a connection through a less formal contact, then I would simply write a polite letter to the manager asking for career advice. Seek what career experts call an "informational interview" as opposed to a "job interview." Your letter should explain you situation and then state that you have learned through the recruiters that the nursery only hires people with previous experience. You are seeking to talk with the manager to learn how you might go about getting the necessary experience to be considered for such a job. If the manager is impressed with you, she might just offer you the job. If she really wants to stick to her guns and only hire peope with previous nursery experience, she will probablly be willing to point you in the right direction to get that experience. Either way, by requesting the "informational interview" rather than the "job interview," you run far less risk of offending the recruiters -- and why make enemies unnecessarily?

    Good luck,
    llg
    This is the best advice I have ever read in my entire life. Thank you so much.
    You have no idea what you have just done for me. And I was just lurking!!
  9. by   Jami RN
    I'm a hospital nurse recruiter and my opinion is that it is okay to bypass the recruiter on this matter. Most of the time, recruiters are just communicating the manager's wants/needs to the applicant. I have had situations where an applicant spoke directly with the manager and was hired in spite of not having the "required experience." Recruiters do serve as the flood gate for applicants and try to protect their managers from getting inundated with calls and inquiries, so its rare for one to refer you directly to the manager, but you probably won't make them mad if you do your research and contact the manager directly.

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