"Do Nots" New to Administrative Role

  1. Took a position as an ADM position of a clinical practice. I thought it would be interesting to start a thread on what "not" to do as an administrative individual. There are some obvious things that I can think of, but I am sure there are some experienced folks here with a wealth of "don'ts" that are worth hearing. Thanks!
    RNator

    A few ideas I have:
    Dont be their best friend
    Dont go out partying with them
    Dont be Facebook friends
    Dont gossip with them
    Dont play favorites
    Last edit by RNator on Feb 14, '16
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   jrt4
    Quote from RNator
    Took a position as an ADM position of a clinical practice. I thought it would be interesting to start a thread on what "not" to do as an administrative individual. There are some obvious things that I can think of, but I am sure there are some experienced folks here with a wealth of "don'ts" that are worth hearing. Thanks!
    RNator



    A few ideas I have:
    Dont be their best friend
    Dont go out partying with them
    Dont be Facebook friends
    Dont gossip with them
    Dont play favorites

    I agree with all your don'ts! some people are more comfortable with being facebook "friends" but people use social media differently. If you are just using it to post pictures of your kids/grandkids or vacations I think that is acceptable but I don't need people knowing if I was out at the bar or if they were out at the bar. I think its a gray area...I just don't.

    a few more don'ts...

    Don't talk to them about other employees regardless of the situation.
    Don't say "yes" to something without first looking into it even if it seems like a simple request
    Don't get sucked into the drama
    Don't talk negatively about the institution
    Don't blame a situation on another department/person...this undermines your authority and they will question how much influence you actually have.

    Do treat people fairly (fair is not always equal and equal is not always fair)
    Do make decisions...they may be wrong but its better to make a decision then to be indecisive.
    Do consult with Human Resources regularly to protect yourself
    Do give people the benefit of the doubt.
    Do empower people to learn from their own mistakes rather than micromanaging.
    Do acknowledge when you make a mistake...we aren't always right.

    I look forward to reading more do's and don'ts
  4. by   Libby1987
    I just recently learned not to start something I can't maintain.

    Fortunately it was a small lesson and involved providing courtesy reminders that some staff quickly came to depend on. You can imagine what happened when I didn't send out the reminder.

    I thought I was helping to build a good habit when in fact the habit unintentionally formed was the expectation of my reminder. So no more cues or reminders unless I can be consistent long term.
  5. by   dawniepoo
    I am not in a management position, but If I ever am I promise to never forget what it is like being a floor nurse. Never forget!
  6. by   RNator
    Quote from dawniepoo
    I am not in a management position, but If I ever am I promise to never forget what it is like being a floor nurse. Never forget!
    I absolutely agree! Has to be top priority...
  7. by   jrt4
    Quote from dawniepoo
    I am not in a management position, but If I ever am I promise to never forget what it is like being a floor nurse. Never forget!
    I agree this is important. However, if you ever take a management role I think your eyes will be opened to some of the pressures.
  8. by   Libby1987
    Quote from dawniepoo
    I am not in a management position, but If I ever am I promise to never forget what it is like being a floor nurse. Never forget!
    I've experienced it from 3 sides. I was cross trained in clerical as an extern which gave me consideration for the medical record details.

    I've worked as a nurse manager following a number of years in patient care and case mgmt. I then returned to patient care which gave me a unique perspective of both sides and shaped me as a company nurse while also a strong patient advocate amd mediator of sorts. It's the primary reason I never jump on the bandwagons in the general forum.

    Now I'm back to mgmt and carrying the clinical perspective close with me.

    I think the multi experiences without a unilateral direction has helped keep me grounded, credible and fair with a broad view. I would never want to lose sight of any of the elements I've encountered.
  9. by   kayern
    As a nurse manager for 15 years one thing I won't do.......ask my staff to do something I would not do. I make sure I stay current with clinical practice so if necessary I can lend a hand. Remember......you are just as much part of their team as they are part of your team
  10. by   Cheyenne RN,BSHS
    Some very important "DOs"
    1. Always be as honest and truthful as you possibly can. If someone called off and it has left you short a staff member and assignments have to be changed tell them why it needing to be changed,
    2, Always set aside certain hours each day and have a open door policy, It can be a gripe fest, a time to vent, or a time to share something tried that went well. Communication is vital to al levels of the healthcare team.
    3. Always say what you mean and mean what you say.
    4. Keep your word. If you say you will follow something up and get back to the person then do it.
    5. Most important praise your employees three times more than you have to correct them.
    6. If you find out you are wrong on something, say so and then correct whatever the issue is.
  11. by   SaltySeasRN
    I've taken on an assistant nurse manager role for about 3 months now with little training going into it and at a time when our unit is going through a unique growth phase. One of the things I find I'm having much difficulty with is that my nurse manager has a select group of the staff that she regularly parties with and has over to her house. At work the favoritism for her "groupies" is very obvious and creates tension with the staff. Despite having been a nurse for 6 years, I've only been on this unit for 1 yr. I've always worked in places where the line between management and staff is not blurred and that is the kind of leader I am, though I am friendly, I refuse to play favorites or go out with the staff after work as I find it makes it more difficult to maintain the leadership role. The problem the other "non-groupie ANMs" and myself are facing, is that she supports her favorites and they can do no wrong including disrespecting and not following unit rules. How do I enforce policies when I am not backed up by my manager?
  12. by   bisson
    If you are not supported by your manager, I suggest using your chain of command. Have you addressed this with your director? But of course, have you spoken to your manager first?

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