Your introduction to your patient

  1. 1
    After almost a year and a half of being a nurse (working Tele now), I still feel the most awkward when going in patient rooms for the first time to introduce myself. I walk in, say "Hello Mr/Mrs. X, My name is X and I'm going to be your nurse until X today. How are you?" or some version of that. I know it sounds irrational but I just feel like a goof doing it, lol. I've tried different approaches, such as popping in quick before my med pass/assessment to write my name on the board and give a quick introduction, and I've also just done the intro/med pass/assessment all at once. I feel awkward either way. This feeling quickly goes away so I don't think it's a "people-person" problem. ack, I don't know. Just wondering if anyone out there feels the same or has any tips on how to not feel so awkward initially. Thanks!
    Mrs. SnowStormRN likes this.
  2. 20 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    I felt the same way you do the few days of in my first nursing job. That was many years ago. I've gotten over it. Now I go inside the exam room, introduce myself then ask them what brought them there. That, I think takes away the attention from myself and focus on the patient. Don't worry, feeling goofy will disappear when you are really busy, because all you could think is you need to give meds to the other patients, bring blanket to another, call the doctor, follow up on the lab, send the pee sample...
  4. 3
    I introduce myself as "your nurse du jour".
  5. 3
    In my organization, we mandate a particular way of introducing yourself to the patient that includes your name, credentials & pertinent experience.... so in my case I would say, "hello, Mr X, I am ...... - I am an RN certified in Critical Care and I have had X years of experience taking care of patients with the type of problems you have" "You may have noticed some extra initials on my name badge, those indicate that I am board certified in ___ & that I am a fourth level clinical nurse which means that I serve as a preceptor and trainer for new staff"

    It may sound silly, but it really works. Patients are much more relaxed when they know that they are being cared for by competent and qualified people. We are not in an office with our diplomas and certifications on the wall, so how will our patients know anything about us unless we tell them? It also positions the relationship so that the patient recognizes the professional expertise of her/his nurse. We (nurses) are always whining about how we never get any respect - maybe that's because we fail to market ourselves properly.... try it for a while.
  6. 0
    Quote from HouTx
    In my organization, we mandate a particular way of introducing yourself to the patient that includes your name, credentials & pertinent experience.... so in my case I would say, "hello, Mr X, I am ...... - I am an RN certified in Critical Care and I have had X years of experience taking care of patients with the type of problems you have" "You may have noticed some extra initials on my name badge, those indicate that I am board certified in ___ & that I am a fourth level clinical nurse which means that I serve as a preceptor and trainer for new staff"

    It may sound silly, but it really works. Patients are much more relaxed when they know that they are being cared for by competent and qualified people. We are not in an office with our diplomas and certifications on the wall, so how will our patients know anything about us unless we tell them? It also positions the relationship so that the patient recognizes the professional expertise of her/his nurse. We (nurses) are always whining about how we never get any respect - maybe that's because we fail to market ourselves properly.... try it for a while.

    Wow..that's a mouthful. It is my biggest, biggest pet peeve as a patient or family member....not knowing who is who. I'm not sure if that passes the handwashing peeve, LOL.

    I always introduce myself right off the bat. I'm I'm walking into the room to do anything with a new patient I will intro myself. Since I'm only pt and prn, I give them a little history....Im xys, I'll be your nurse tonite until 11pm. I'm new to you, but not the facility...I've worked here ..... but now I'm part time. yada yada...
  7. 4
    Quote from HouTx
    In my organization, we mandate a particular way of introducing yourself to the patient that includes your name, credentials & pertinent experience.... so in my case I would say, "hello, Mr X, I am ...... - I am an RN certified in Critical Care and I have had X years of experience taking care of patients with the type of problems you have" "You may have noticed some extra initials on my name badge, those indicate that I am board certified in ___ & that I am a fourth level clinical nurse which means that I serve as a preceptor and trainer for new staff"

    It may sound silly, but it really works. Patients are much more relaxed when they know that they are being cared for by competent and qualified people. We are not in an office with our diplomas and certifications on the wall, so how will our patients know anything about us unless we tell them? It also positions the relationship so that the patient recognizes the professional expertise of her/his nurse. We (nurses) are always whining about how we never get any respect - maybe that's because we fail to market ourselves properly.... try it for a while.
    How are new grads expected to intro themselves to patients, especially the ones off orientation?
  8. 2
    I introduce myself with my name, job title and what I can do for the patient. It goes something like:

    Hi, I'm Katie, I am your nursing assistant for today. I can help you with most things, but if I can't I can get the nurse to come to you. Just use your call bell (I check that they know how to use it) and we'll be with you as soon as we can. Your nurse will be in shortly to introduce yourself. Her name is _______.
    Mrs. SnowStormRN and miss81 like this.
  9. 5
    Quote from HouTx
    In my organization, we mandate a particular way of introducing yourself to the patient that includes your name, credentials & pertinent experience.... so in my case I would say, "hello, Mr X, I am ...... - I am an RN certified in Critical Care and I have had X years of experience taking care of patients with the type of problems you have" "You may have noticed some extra initials on my name badge, those indicate that I am board certified in ___ & that I am a fourth level clinical nurse which means that I serve as a preceptor and trainer for new staff"

    It may sound silly, but it really works. Patients are much more relaxed when they know that they are being cared for by competent and qualified people. We are not in an office with our diplomas and certifications on the wall, so how will our patients know anything about us unless we tell them? It also positions the relationship so that the patient recognizes the professional expertise of her/his nurse. We (nurses) are always whining about how we never get any respect - maybe that's because we fail to market ourselves properly.... try it for a while.
    I would NOT be comfortable saying this..at all. I dont know, it sounds like a plea for attention or something. I think its great if you are comfortable saying thing but for me, it just wouldn't work.
    Little_Mouse, Dazglue, SneakySnake, and 2 others like this.
  10. 1
    Quote from KatieP86
    I introduce myself with my name, job title and what I can do for the patient. It goes something like:

    Hi, I'm Katie, I am your nursing assistant for today. I can help you with most things, but if I can't I can get the nurse to come to you. Just use your call bell (I check that they know how to use it) and we'll be with you as soon as we can. Your nurse will be in shortly to introduce yourself. Her name is _______.
    A lot of the NA's where I work wouldn't do this because most of them say that they don't what the pt's to know their names because "they won't stop ringing their buzzer for me and it'll seem like I have all day for them."

    Your introduction was very professional!
    sparklie.lady likes this.
  11. 1
    [quote=HouTx;5548775]In my organization, we mandate a particular way of introducing yourself to the patient that includes your name, credentials & pertinent experience.... so in my case I would say, "hello, Mr X, I am ...... - I am an RN certified in Critical Care and I have had X years of experience taking care of patients with the type of problems you have" "You may have noticed some extra initials on my name badge, those indicate that I am board certified in ___ & that I am a fourth level clinical nurse which means that I serve as a preceptor and trainer for new staff"

    That is too much scripting; sounds like what my management was trying to make us do. They actually had some organization do that and we simply refused to do it because i don't think management should be teaching us how to talk to patients. My introductions are simple; " I am XYZ and will be your nurse while you are in the ED department". Then of course i will go over their plan of care. Another thing i do is do a bedside hand off to the next nurse. And if they need to know what the extra initials mean then they can ask me and i happily tell them.
    Mrs. SnowStormRN likes this.


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