Young, Thin, and Cute New Hires - page 27

by TheCommuter 52,732 Views | 295 Comments Senior Moderator

My workplace, a freestanding specialty hospital owned by a for-profit corporation that operates multiple facilities across the United States, has been having recent troubles with low Press Ganey patient satisfaction scores. This... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from samadams8

    Really now?
    Yes really...
  2. 0
    Quote from ColoradoRocky

    As a matter of fact, I do: English, German, Arabic (Iraqi dialect) some Spanish (Im mainly teaching myself Spanish for medical reasons), and enough Pashtun to politely greet and eat. I've forgotten almost all of my Russian so I don't count that anymore. Life experience again, living in other cultures.

    As for life experience, we all bring our own, and you certainly have had a full plate for your age. But check the attitude about it at the door. Remember why we are all here - the patient.

    The problem, I think, that you are focused on patient satisfaction scores, which is not the same as the health and well being of the patient. I am of the opinion that patient satisfaction scores are probably not the best indicator of health outcomes - they only indicate how much the patient "feels" about the services, not about the actual quality of the outcomes.

    I think hiring for looks (as was alleged) is a poor managerial decision designed to prop up satisfaction scores via cosmetic measures, rather than provide for better care. In essence it is addressing a business problem (due to how hospitals are scored these days). But they are being superficial: treating the symptoms (satisfaction scores), but not the cause (patient outcomes, adequate staffing to allow time for compassionate care). A compassionate nurse with a patient load that allows them to spend time with the patients will garner higher satisfaction scores than will a overworked, only seen at rounds and meds, nurse who looks like a supermodel. The bonus is that the former will also address outcomes and so on, which over time will lead to higher satisfaction scores. The problem is that the better solution is not the cheaper solution, nor is it obvious to management that comes from business mindset that still is philosophically based on managing production (think Six Sigma or Deming PDCA), not a medical one. For that issue, there is no pat answer -- all the choices are difficult, and applying business methods to medical care (including the application of the word "customer") can produce undesired outcomes (measuring the wrong thing can result in treating the wrong thing).

    Back to us, nurses. As nurses, we need all the tools in the toolbox, including compassion and empathy. That's where "life experience" comes in - it gives you a few more tools in the toolbox. I disagree with you that it being meaningless. Being on the other side of the bedrail in ICU as you were, IMHO it definitely gives you a better viewpoint when dealing with a patient in such circumstances, and can help you better communicate and care for the patient (helping both satisfaction and outcome scores). So its relevant. Don't underestimate the value of "soft factors" (versus hard statistics) -- these are mostly secondary to our technical and academic skills, but experience tempers and influences how we use those primary skills. That's why proper experience matters.

    As for low cut tops and batting eyelashes, I would be very concerned if it were an option for anyone. I believe that merit (achievement), experience (temperament) and "fit" to the position are the best considerations. It was true when I interviewed and hired engineers, and is also probably true for nursing as well. I expect that will I make it on my own merits - and that's where I go back to the original post: All I want is a fair chance -- I dont want to be eliminated because I'm a guy, or older. I have a feeling wearing a low cut blouse is not an option for me.
    I don't remember but was I even talking to YOU directly?
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    Quote from Jenni811
    I don't remember but was I even talking to YOU directly?
    It doesn't matter. Even though you might not have addressed this particular member directly, this individual is still allowed to respond to any post that he wants to directly address as long as his response falls within the realm of healthy debate.
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    Studies have proven that more attractive people are thought to be more competent. Perhaps this is why.


    To hire those in shape brings a whole slew of benefits from a business standpoint; lower health insurance, less injury, shows patients health is important to nurse.. etc;
  5. 0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    It doesn't matter. Even though you might not have addressed this particular member directly, this individual is still allowed to respond to any post that he wants to directly address as long as his response falls within the realm of healthy debate.
    Sheesh!!! I was just asking as a reminder. I didn't mean it to be a smart "butt." Honestly I never ever said nobody couldn't respond to that. So lets not make assumptions. All I asked was of it was him/her I was asking the language question to. It was pages and pages ago I don't remember.
  6. 0
    Quote from Carley77
    Studies have proven that more attractive people are thought to be more competent. Perhaps this is why.

    To hire those in shape brings a whole slew of benefits from a business standpoint; lower health insurance, less injury, shows patients health is important to nurse.. etc;
    Wow...id really enjoy reading these studies. Are they wikipedia studies? Because wikipedia also is telling me my bloody nose a week ago is from an aneurysm and I should have been dead um...7 or 8 days ago?
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    Quote from Jenni811
    Sheesh!!! I was just asking as a reminder. I didn't mean it to be a smart "butt." Honestly I never ever said nobody couldn't respond to that. So lets not make assumptions. All I asked was of it was him/her I was asking the language question to. It was pages and pages ago I don't remember.
    Okay, sounds cool with me. No hard feelings here.
  8. 1
    Quote from Jenni811
    I still don't understand how better looking nurses will boost satisfaction. Have you ever looked at those questions they ask? It never asks "are you satisfied with having a cute, young nurse?" Or anything related. Perhaps professionalism but that isn't the same thing.
    I know, right? Personally, I'd rather have an older, motherly nurse. When I delivered in my own L&D unit, and I was able to pick my own nurse for my labor, I chose one of the older ladies who had 2 decades of experience. She's a little plump, has 5 grown kids, and is one of the best nurses I know. I didn't pick her for her looks, I picked her for her rock-steady personality and experience. Same things I used to choose my OB.
    prnqday likes this.
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    Quote from Carley77
    Studies have proven that more attractive people are thought to be more competent. Perhaps this is why.


    To hire those in shape brings a whole slew of benefits from a business standpoint; lower health insurance, less injury, shows patients health is important to nurse.. etc;
    I think this is exactly the thought process of some of our upper management in choosing these younger hires. In my area, as elsewhere in the U.S., many facilities do not hire those who use tobacco because of the costs. Ironically, many of our decision makers are AARP eligible, sedentary, martini drinkers! My last director was practically a chain smoker! She has since retired.
    LadyFree28 and SoldierNurse22 like this.
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    I don't care what you look like. Just be nice to me and don't kill me. Yay


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