Young, Thin, and Cute New Hires - page 28

My workplace, a freestanding specialty hospital owned by a for-profit corporation that operates multiple facilities across the United States, has been having recent troubles with low Press Ganey... Read More

  1. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I am still working at the same place of employment and have seen several managerial changes. Now that we've got another CNO, most of the new hires have been 'older' and somewhat experienced, although not in our specialty.

    All the youngish, attractive hires from several years ago stuck around less than a year before moving on. It's been the nurses in their 50s who seem to have the lowest employee turnover rates in our facility. The nurses in their 20s and early 30s seem to get six months to one year of experience before leaving for seemingly greener pastures.

    I am weakly entertaining the idea of looking for another job due to a myriad of reasons.
    Ah the little experiment did not net the hoped-for result? Shocking. Maybe it's time to show some love for those "fat old" nurses now, seeing as the young, thin and pretty ones can hardly bother to stick around. After all, it's those old, fat nurses picking up the slack left by the lack of experience/loyalty by the eye candy who move on to bigger and better things........but then.....

    But then again, nursing, as well as many careers, hardly rewards competence, experience and loyalty any more. Not when you can have "eye candy" of a "nice boy/ girl" bring you your damn coffee! Priorities!

    LMDAO.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Apr 8
  2. by   TheCommuter
    Since this thread has been resurrected from a slumber, I will provide an update. I no longer work at this facility. I left direct patient care in late 2015 and hope to not look back anytime soon.
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I am still working at the same place of employment and have seen several managerial changes. Now that we've got another CNO, most of the new hires have been 'older' and somewhat experienced, although not in our specialty.

    All the youngish, attractive hires from several years ago stuck around less than a year before moving on. It's been the nurses in their 50s who seem to have the lowest employee turnover rates in our facility. The nurses in their 20s and early 30s seem to get six months to one year of experience before leaving for seemingly greener pastures.

    I am weakly entertaining the idea of looking for another job due to a myriad of reasons.

close