Young, Thin, and Cute New Hires - page 26

My workplace, a freestanding specialty hospital owned by a for-profit corporation that operates multiple facilities across the United States, has been having recent troubles with low Press Ganey... Read More

  1. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I am still working at the same place of employment and have seen several managerial changes. Now that we've got another CNO, most of the new hires have been 'older' and somewhat experienced, although not in our specialty.

    All the youngish, attractive hires from several years ago stuck around less than a year before moving on. It's been the nurses in their 50s who seem to have the lowest employee turnover rates in our facility. The nurses in their 20s and early 30s seem to get six months to one year of experience before leaving for seemingly greener pastures.

    I am weakly entertaining the idea of looking for another job due to a myriad of reasons.
    Ah the little experiment did not net the hoped-for result? Shocking. Maybe it's time to show some love for those "fat old" nurses now, seeing as the young, thin and pretty ones can hardly bother to stick around. After all, it's those old, fat nurses picking up the slack left by the lack of experience/loyalty by the eye candy who move on to bigger and better things........but then.....

    But then again, nursing, as well as many careers, hardly rewards competence, experience and loyalty any more. Not when you can have "eye candy" of a "nice boy/ girl" bring you your damn coffee! Priorities!

    LMDAO.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Apr 8
  2. by   TheCommuter
    Since this thread has been resurrected from a slumber, I will provide an update. I no longer work at this facility. I left direct patient care in late 2015 and hope to not look back anytime soon.
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I am still working at the same place of employment and have seen several managerial changes. Now that we've got another CNO, most of the new hires have been 'older' and somewhat experienced, although not in our specialty.

    All the youngish, attractive hires from several years ago stuck around less than a year before moving on. It's been the nurses in their 50s who seem to have the lowest employee turnover rates in our facility. The nurses in their 20s and early 30s seem to get six months to one year of experience before leaving for seemingly greener pastures.

    I am weakly entertaining the idea of looking for another job due to a myriad of reasons.
  3. by   NurseNeLz
    When I was first hired I was young, cute and thin. Then nursing took a toll on me😫😫😫😫😫😂😂😂😂.
  4. by   TriciaJ
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I'm not jealous by any stretch of the imagination. I mentioned that the group of new hires ranges from early 20s to early 30s. I am in my early 30s, so I am in the same age range of some of these newly hired nurses. Jealousy is not the synonym of observation.
    I do not need an attitude adjustment, but your suggestion was certainly appreciated. I get along with this group of newly hired nurses wonderfully and appreciate the help that they will contribute to ease our staffing issues once they begin to come off orientation.
    There are masses of 40+ year-old newer RNs who changed careers or are late-entry nurses in the large metro area where I live, yet management hired no newer middle-aged nurses with one to three years of experience.

    Some people seem to have missed my point, which is that units need a healthy mix of experience and inexperience. Then again, some people are dramatic 'offendonistas' who purposely seek to become offended when no offense was intended.
    In the original post, I did not hear Commuter bashing young people, attractive people or new grads. I didn't hear any bashing at all. What I took was that her employer decided to boost the Press-Ganey scores by hiring strictly for looks. And that it turned out exactly as one would expect: some of the young beautiful things are really great nurses; others - not so much.

    Other than in the fashion industry, hiring strictly for looks is generally a poor business practice. It'll boost the Press-Ganey scores about as much as hanging great art on the walls.

    And then the bash-fest ensued. "I'm young and beautiful and clever and can do everything anyone else can do except for the grammar thingy". "We're fed up with the old bats bullying us!" etc etc.

    Meanwhile, facility managements keep doing what they do. They'll throw endless sums of money at everything but solving the real problem. When they're chronically short-staffed and the staff they do have are inexperienced and have no mentors, those winning smiles aren't going to be enough.
  5. by   MECO28
    Yeah, well, I started out young and thin but 4 years of nursing school, 3 years of being an NAC, and 6 years of being a nurse have taken a toll on me.
    I've gained twenty pounds, have a bad back and knees, and despite running half marathons every few months, I feel woefully out of shape.
    But hell, I'm a way better nurse now than when I was young and thin and at least I rarely get hit on by creepy patients now. Plus, I make more $$. There are perks to aging.

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