Why nurses don't want to be identified in public? - page 5

It's funny. I remember hearing nurses tell stories about being in the public and not wanting anyone to know that they are a nurse. I always thought that was strange, because I've always been so... Read More

  1. Visit  Ruas61 profile page
    4
    Quote from MotherRN
    As a confirmed Catholic, I am obligated to provide good counsel when the situation arises.

    You, of course, are free to exercise your own will as to whether or not you choose to listen.

    Still it is my duty to speak up, though I realize I will be expressing an unpopular belief.

    It's Sunday. I hope you all have a peaceful day and try not to take my words as a personal attack- they were meant to challenge an attitude. Much like a Sunday homily does.

    Semantics perhaps, but to say to 'challenge an attitude' particularly when you put a decidedly religious perspective on it comes off poorly.

    It's sounds superior, judgmental and the very opposite of what you endorse.
    DizzyLizzyNurse, gonzo1, lillymom, and 1 other like this.
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  3. Visit  Altra profile page
    5
    Quote from Ruas61
    It sounds superior, judgmental and the very opposite of what you endorse.
    Yes, it does, in the opinion of this confirmed Catholic.
  4. Visit  MotherRN profile page
    0
    Quote from Mully
    Sweet conversation.
    Oh, and, the OP is a MAN! Not that you would have known...


    I think the two different opinions come from two different interpretations of the story, which causes the disagreement. One side sees the interaction as a light, not-very-consequential moment in time, where the other side sees it as the man deeply hurting and strongly needing someone at that very moment. Maybe he is just making conversation, or maybe his world is coming to an end. Maybe he hardly knew his mother, or maybe she was his everything. The story doesn't give us enough information, making this impossible to distinguish. Maybe you both actually agree, and would react the same way in either situation, it's just that you both read the story, and the man's needs, differently.
    For me, the issue isn't the details of this one story, it's more about the big picture- the attitude being casually put forth that helping random people you run into in life when off the clock is a negative situation. That bothers me.

    I find it interesting however that the whole story revolves around the fear that this stranger who want something from the OP because he was in scrubs. And, it turns out the man never even engaged the OP at all.

    Personally, I find that the few questions I do get in public usually lead to frustration on the part of the asker because 1) I can't magically diagnose their problem ( I'm not a CT scan machine or insta-lab genie) so without the ability to run tests, who really knows conclusively what their problem is and 2) the 'nursing advice' I can give is usually something they already know or could look up online for themselves. Besides, who really expects a nurse to be the doctor and have all the answers? I know I didn't before I became a nurse.

    But, what I can do is simply let a person talk, that may be all they need- to vent. I find myself saying, "I understand" a lot since nursing school. It seems to work. As a matter of fact, a nurse used it on me the other day when I was floated to another unit and was 'venting'...
  5. Visit  MotherRN profile page
    2
    Quote from Ruas61
    Semantics perhaps, but to say to 'challenge an attitude' particularly when you put a decidedly religious perspective on it comes off poorly.

    It's sounds superior, judgmental and the very opposite of what you endorse.
    Sorry you feel this way. But, that is the usual response whenever someone brings their religious beliefs into an argument.

    The truth is the truth- it's not situational.
    Szasz_is_Right and Mully like this.
  6. Visit  MotherRN profile page
    0
    Quote from ~*Stargazer*~
    Huh. So you're saying that it's my duty as a human being to be happy to talk to random strangers that invade my privacy? That to do otherwise means I am lacking in compassion? Interesting. I wonder what Ted Bundy's victims would think of that?

    At any rate, since we're all throwing in our two cents, it's not really listening to a stranger's sob story that makes me not want to be identified as a nurse while off the clock. I can do that, that's easy. My biggest fear is having to do the Heimlich maneuver. Now that scares me.
    Bundy, huh? Well, as native Floridian and from the era of Bundy ( and having studied him in my persuasion classes back in college along with Manson). I think what we all learned from Bundy was to have some common sense when dealing with strangers. You don't carry someone's books to their car! Keep your conversations out in the open. If your 'spidey sense' tells you this person is 'off', then maybe you need to walk away. But, seriously, we're talking about public, brief encounters. I think you'd be 'safe' talking to an elderly man in an IHOP!
  7. Visit  Anna Flaxis profile page
    4
    You must not have studied Bundy too extensively, or you'd know that he didn't make anybody's spidey senses tingle. That's how he worked. Also, the OP did not say the man was elderly, nor did he identify the restaurant as an IHOP.

    But anyway, you make being physically and emotionally exhausted after having spent the last 12 hours caring for others sound like a moral shortcoming. And attempting to put the weight of your particular brand of religion behind it it I find distasteful.

    The truth is subjective.
  8. Visit  MotherRN profile page
    0
    Quote from Altra
    Yes, it does, in the opinion of this confirmed Catholic.
    It's sad so many Catholics shy away from evangelization. Have the courage of your convictions. Share the message. It is not being superior or judgmental to share the message of charity and love.
  9. Visit  hiddencatRN profile page
    6
    I can't believe I'm the only one who wanted to talk about the waffle. I can't stop thinking about it.

    I think my best "I wish I wasn't obviously a nurse" moment was when the cashier in the Dunkin Donuts drive through wanted me to determine if her wrist was broken. And because I was so caught off guard, instead of making a joke about my x-ray vision, I actually palpated her wrist and stammered something out about it being hard to say and she should probably see her doctor.
  10. Visit  MotherRN profile page
    0
    Quote from ~*Stargazer*~
    You must not have studied Bundy too extensively, or you'd know that he didn't make anybody's spidey senses tingle. That's how he worked. Also, the OP did not say the man was elderly, nor did he identify the restaurant as an IHOP.

    But anyway, you make being physically and emotionally exhausted after having spent the last 12 hours caring for others sound like a moral shortcoming. And attempting to put the weight of your particular brand of religion behind it it I find distasteful.

    The truth is subjective.
    Bundy was attractive and appeared to be injured to make himself seem harmless. Girls were duped into helping him, against their better judgment. Girls are better informed now thanks to studying these cases. There were some girls who didn't fall for his tactics. They came forward after the news went public. He wasn't always successful. One even refused him and he dragged her off anyway. She got away shortly thereafter and when she told the story, she said how she knew something was wrong as soon as he approached her.

    I'll pray you get a good night's sleep!
  11. Visit  Ruby Vee profile page
    6
    Quote from MotherRN
    It's sad so many Catholics shy away from evangelization. Have the courage of your convictions. Share the message. It is not being superior or judgmental to share the message of charity and love.
    It's too bad that more people -- Catholic and Protestant -- don't shy away from evangelization. It is entirely possible -- if not preferable -- to have the courage of your convictions without turning folks way by evangelizing.
    DizzyLizzyNurse, Luckyyou, Ruas61, and 3 others like this.
  12. Visit  DoeRN profile page
    1
    Quote from hiddencatRN
    I can't believe I'm the only one who wanted to talk about the waffle. I can't stop thinking about it.

    I think my best "I wish I wasn't obviously a nurse" moment was when the cashier in the Dunkin Donuts drive through wanted me to determine if her wrist was broken. And because I was so caught off guard, instead of making a joke about my x-ray vision, I actually palpated her wrist and stammered something out about it being hard to say and she should probably see her doctor.
    I know we've bumped heads in the past but after reading this article I went to the Waffle House and had a waffle and bacon!

    I have had a lot of people come up to me wanting free medical advice. I'm programmed now to say see your PCP. One woman asked me about having her thyroid checked because she was diagnosed with a thyroid condition and she didn't believe it but now she is having problems. I said see your PCP and rolled my shopping cart away.

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com
    hiddencatRN likes this.
  13. Visit  MotherRN profile page
    0
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    It's too bad that more people -- Catholic and Protestant -- don't shy away from evangelization. It is entirely possible -- if not preferable -- to have the courage of your convictions without turning folks way by evangelizing.
    It's MUCH better to just quote from anonymous sources snarky little sarcastic quips than from the book that is the inspired word of God when on All Nurses, apparently. And, when people continue to wander around in the dark puffing themselves up with such advice it is no wonder that attitudes of selfishness, like the one's so many have shared on this post, abound.

    But, hey, just so long as the guy standing next to me says my actions are okay...I must be doing it right. That's all the measuring stick one needs, right? The pat on the back of a fellow sinner. Let's just leave religion out of it, right? Who needs THAT nonsense, right?
  14. Visit  SaoirseRN profile page
    3
    Quote from MotherRN

    It's MUCH better to just quote from anonymous sources snarky little sarcastic quips than from the book that is the inspired word of God when on All Nurses, apparently. And, when people continue to wander around in the dark puffing themselves up with such advice it is no wonder that attitudes of selfishness, like the one's so many have shared on this post, abound.

    But, hey, just so long as the guy standing next to me says my actions are okay...I must be doing it right. That's all the measuring stick one needs, right? The pat on the back of a fellow sinner. Let's just leave religion out of it, right? Who needs THAT nonsense, right?
    Quote the bible to your heart's content. My lack of religion doesn't make me a selfish person. Knowing the bible doesn't make you a selfless one. Everyone has moments of selfishness, religious people or non religious people. Just because I do not use a book to guide my actions does not make me a sinner.


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