Why Is It That Everyone Thinks They're A Good Nurse? - page 5

i don't get it. people write about the horrible mistakes they've made that got them fired from work or suspended, and then they'll go on to say that they know they're a good nurse anyway because... Read More

  1. by   redhead_NURSE98!
    Quote from CloudySue
    Wipe the first drop? Never heard that one in my entire nursing program and never saw anyone do that at work. Was only taught to wipe the area w an alcohol swab and let it dry before testing.
    Some people if you wiped the first drop you would never get enough for a second drop!
  2. by   redhead_NURSE98!
    Quote from sapphire18
    If I read one more post about this "generation of ME ME ME/entitlement" ****, I think I'm going to throw up.
    Sometimes the truth hurts!
  3. by   TakeTwoAspirin
    It's the same mentality as the people who say they can drive in snow, it's just "everyone else" that they worry about! I have never, ever, heard anyone say they suck at driving in snow and it's only the skill and talent of other drivers in bad weather that prevents accidents.
  4. by   joanna73
    Some people aren't honest with themselves. If you can believe your own fabrication, perhaps it's true? I'm not sure.
  5. by   OnlybyHisgraceRN
    Quote from redhead_NURSE98!
    Sometimes the truth hurts!
    Actually it is the generalizations that hurt. I worked hard for everything I have by the grace of God.
    I started college at 16 years old and didn't receive one penny from my parents ( they couldn't afford to pay for my education).
    I moved out at 18 years old and supported MYSELF, and never asked for a hand out or a break. I know what is like to struggle. I worked full time through the most of LPN and RN school. Now at 23 I'm proud to say I'm a RN. I don't have a sense of entitlement. No one owes me anything. The only way to move up in this world is through hard work and dedication. Yes some of my generation are spoiled little brats, I get that and not oblivious to this. However, It does bother me when generalizations are made.
  6. by   redhead_NURSE98!
    Why would it bother you? It apparently gives you an opportunity to show everyone how unique your situation is. Lord knows it ain't that common.
  7. by   BetterMeRN
    To cut to the chase. We are all good nurses until we make that first mistake that gets noticed. I say noticed because many, many mistakes go unnoticed. Consider yourself a good nurse....for now.
  8. by   VICEDRN
    Quote from Bortaz, RN

    The only thing more ridiculous are the old school nurses that post almost 100% of their posts about how badly the younger generation of nurses suck ***.
    lol. I was just thinking as I was reading this thread that the only thing more ridiculous than people who don't realize how they are struggling in the beginning is how people cling like desperate grasshoppers to blades of grass in the hurricane to their "experience" as a nurse.

    The only thing I have seen "experience" bring anyone is years and years of bad habits and misguided thoughts.

    For the record, measures of nursing performance suggest that I acquire nursing skills a little faster than the norm but I am lot more focused on mastering softer unmeasurable stuff, like keeping all the family members straight and happy. lol
  9. by   Vespertinas
    Quote from VICEDRN
    The only thing I have seen "experience" bring anyone is years and years of bad habits and misguided thoughts.
    That's the only thing? So much for avoiding generalizations.
  10. by   maelstrom143
    I think the movement of talking yourself up has gotten a little out of hand. I have only been doing this for 6 years and still have a ways to go before I can even get near those nurses I strive to model myself after. Every day, every shift brings new and intrigueing information and experiences and furthers you in becoming better, faster, stronger as a nurse.
    When looking at your fourth career move, it is time to take stock of where you are and what is going on, cause something is OBVIOUSLY not working for ya. jmho.
  11. by   rn/writer
    Mr. Trouble comes around when people--of any age--don't separate themselves and their personal identities from what they do and how well they do it.

    Learning to take constructive criticism in a healthy way is an acquired skill that many have never mastered. They equate an honest evaluation of their abilities and actions as an attack on their very being and become defensive and unteachable, to everyone's detriment.

    The result is that you have nurses who dismiss valuable input as "eating their young" and wall themselves off from people who could help them if they would only listen. Granted, some criticism is delivered in a harsh or unprofessional manner, and that makes it harder to separate the wheat from the chaff. But if you can't receive any correction without going into a tailspin and developing a chip on your shoulder, you simply will not evolve--as a nurse or as a human being.

    People here on AN sometimes try to encourage a member who has made mistakes (sometimes a lot of mistakes!) and either lost a job or was disciplined in some manner, and they say things like, "You're a great nurse," or "I can tell you have a lot of compassion and you care so much," or "Anyone who tries as hard as you do must be a really good nurse."

    I think they're trying to comfort the person. But when you're not able to make the distinction between self and skills, identity and actions, personality and vocation, that's what happens. And that's why separating the two is crucial.

    The reality is often something like, "You are a wonderful and worthwhile person. But you have made a number of mistakes and you need to take that seriously and work on the areas where you are deficient."

    With everything blended into a blur, there is only all up or all down. That is a childish way of thinking, no matter how old the individual is. As a person matures, there should be an increased ability to compartmentalize the different areas of life and give each the reaction and attention it needs.

    This is a major life skill that, unfortunately, hasn't been taught the way it should have been. The result is a hodgepodge of confusion, misery, attitude, hostility, hurt, misunderstanding, fear, obsession, and a few other non-productive responses.

    Those who care feel tortured and overwhelmed. Those who take a more narcissistic approach feel slighted and irate. Many fall somewhere in between.

    What's the solution? Growing up. Recognizing the boundaries between who you are and what you do. Learning to take an honest inventory of what you do and then embracing the good and improving the bad.

    This can be done at any age. It's never too early or too late.
    Last edit by rn/writer on Apr 9, '12
  12. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from VICEDRN
    I was just thinking as I was reading this thread that the only thing more ridiculous than people who don't realize how they are struggling in the beginning is how people cling like desperate grasshoppers to blades of grass in the hurricane to their "experience" as a nurse.

    The only thing I have seen "experience" bring anyone is years and years of bad habits and misguided thoughts.
    Oh, my. That's all experience brings? Well, then we should all hope that graduating nurses stay in the profession for about a year, and then quit to become baggage handlers at the airport. Because, after all, we wouldn't want to risk them acquiring "years and years of bad habits and misguided thoughts".
  13. by   anotherone
    Quote from ruby vee

    what ever happened to striving to be a good nurse but knowing you're not there yet? knowing you need a bit more experience to be a great nurse but you're trying hard? how come everyone these days is a good nurse the moment they graduate?
    i am a newer nurse and i do not think i am super nurse. i won't say i am a bad nurse but i am not the best either. i sometimes worry that i am not good enough. there is always room for improvement. always.

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