Why In The Heck Should I Be A Loyal Nurse? - page 2

by TheCommuter Asst. Admin

As a nurse, is it really worth it to show loyalty to your place of employment? Perhaps there truly are benefits to being a loyal employee. Maybe not. Your thoughts on workplace loyalty are probably dependent upon the... Read More


  1. 10
    I'm a full generation older than the Generation X'ers, and I feel exactly the same way they do: I'll remain loyal to an employer as long as they treat me right. They stop treating me right, or try kicking me to the curb with the garbage, I'm done---no questions asked. No nurse can afford to be loyal in a time when hospitals and corporations no longer feel they owe anything to the people who keep them in business.
  2. 10
    I was one who started in the seventies working for a hospital I genuinely felt there existed a reciprocal feeling of loyalty. We even had a union get enough signatures for a vote. The union lost. Now it's a completely different environment, sad to say. I learned that the hard way recently when I expected to be treated in an "old values" way, and got royally screwed for my efforts. It's very strange to feel like you've been a Pollyanna at over fifty years old. I learned my lesson, but there's still a profound sense of sadness that the name of the game now is to protect yourself first, and be very sparing when it comes to trusting their word.
    Babs1953, chevyv, MsBruiser, and 7 others like this.
  3. 5
    My Dad was a "company man" for most of my childhood until things at his company broke up in the late 1980s. I remember the company picnics and parties. His old coworkers and their families have remained lifelong friends with us.
    Those days aren't coming back anytime soon.
    Most of us have never experienced anything except the modern workplace.
    chevyv, AmericanRN, SweettartRN, and 2 others like this.
  4. 12
    I feel some loyalty towards my manager. There have been a couple times she's looked out for me. That's not being naive, as I was burned badly before I started working for her, so I've got my eyes wide open. She really is a good boss. (As far as bosses go! )
    But the company? Not so much. I'm just as loyal towards them as they are towards the nursing staff. And that is NONE. They'll screw us over in a heartbeat. Little things here and there add up to big things. They talk a good game with their non-profit philanthropic spouting off about our mission and ideals. But they're just as full of corporate doublespeak as an HCA or Wal-Mart.
    MsBruiser, Barley, KelRN215, and 9 others like this.
  5. 2
    I was very loyal to the 4 or so units where I worked...until I got into CRNA school.... WOOOT! Always advocate for yourself when it comes to issues outside direct patient care. No one else will do it for you.
    MedChica and anotherone like this.
  6. 1
    Quote from wooh
    I feel some loyalty towards my manager. There have been a couple times she's looked out for me. That's not being naive, as I was burned badly before I started working for her, so I've got my eyes wide open. She really is a good boss. (As far as bosses go! )
    But the company? Not so much. I'm just as loyal towards them as they are towards the nursing staff. And that is NONE. They'll screw us over in a heartbeat. Little things here and there add up to big things. They talk a good game with their non-profit philanthropic spouting off about our mission and ideals. But they're just as full of corporate doublespeak as an HCA or Wal-Mart.
    i get you about the good boss. i love my boss. she has been good to me throughout nursing school. it makes all the difference...

    but i wanna move on already. i needed to read this article. brings quite a few things into perspective!
    anotherone likes this.
  7. 6
    I'm loyal to my employer without being naive. If I were to walk in tomorrow night only to find my boss ready with a pink slip, I wouldn't surprised. Not that I'm bad at my job, or that my boss, coworkers, and patients don't like me, but that's the nature of the business world. That being said, I am grateful to my boss for giving a new grad a chance. My coworkers have embraced me and I've had a wonderful environment to learn my new trade. If/when the time comes for me to leave, I'll give plenty of notice and leave professionally. A long as my boss and coworkers continue to show me loyalty, they'll get the same in return.
  8. 0
    so true!
  9. 4
    I worked at a place that worked to treat their employees right. We did company picnics, very fancy expensive dinners when you reached 5 years employment, 10 years, etc. The owner came and talked to the staff and actually gave a crap. In return the staff was great. Our LTC was so different than your "typical" nursing home. Then he decided to retire and sell his company. At the same time we got a new administrator for our particular branch who was all about the bottom dollar. She was sneaky and waited until the DON was out on maternity leave to screw me over. She tried to screw me over in a BIG way. I was out job hunting the next day and put in my notice as soon as I had a job. From what I heard the DON threw a wicked fit when she found out because I had been there 10 years. They paid for my schooling. I was a very good employee. "How can you do that? Now she's leaving. It's hard to find a great employee who sticks around!!" But the administrator didn't give a crap because they could bring in a new grad (in that terrible economy) and pay her way less than I was getting paid.

    From what I hear, my old place of employment (a nursing home with easily over half of the staff having been there 5 years minimum) is going down the drain and becoming more of a "typical" nursing home with big staff turnover. People who have been there 20 years have left and when I talk to the ones who are still there they are pretty bitter and miserable and looking for a way out. Pretty sad.
    Not_A_Hat_Person, chevyv, BrandonLPN, and 1 other like this.
  10. 8
    I thank God for at-will employment because it works both ways.
    When my time with an organization is done, I am free to part ways.

    I get told "you're burning bridges" but it has yet to happen. In fact at two places that I have quit in the last 10 years both bosses that give references always state that they would hire me back in a heartbeat. Keeping and maintaining good relationships with a few that you work with is always a good idea.

    Loyalty to my employer? No way in hell. Mainly, because it no longer works both ways.


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