What's the weirdest thing management has said to you? - page 8

by monkeybug

46,015 Views | 134 Comments

Based on the thank you card thread, what's the most bizarre thing said to you by management or administration? I can think of a few that will always stand out in my mind. When discussing our patient satisfaction surveys,... Read More


  1. 8
    Our VBDN (Very Big Deal in Nursing) has an office across from our unit and comes in right before day shift starts. We got lectured about "call lights not being answered" (because they are being answered elsewhere, 6AM to 8AM is a very busy time for us - potty calls, pain meds, etc) and "IV pump alarms going off incessantly" and how all of this detracts from the Patient Care Experience. She also mentioned that she can hear "staff talking and laughing in the halls". Like, at the change of shift. She added that if SHE can hear us, the PATIENTS must be able to hear us, and what must the patients think!?! *clutches pearls*
  2. 0
    Have another one! I'm working my shift and get pulled my management for an unexpected meeting. This meeting took 30-
  3. 0
    Quote from thebackrow
    I had an employee health nurse tell my group in a updated educational session " There is no such thing as a violent ER Patient". Her statement was met with a round of laughter and jeers yelling " you have obviously never been in the ER!"
    O.M.G. Really how stupid is she? Wow some people should keep their mouths shut.
  4. 6
    I am lucky to be working for(for 10 years now) a hopsital that doesn't much do this stuff. If we ask for supplies, it is the time it takes to get it delivered that we wait. The PTO is pretty straight forward. You get your breaks if you want them and there is no flack for call ins(other than weather related...I'll get to that) and if staffing is short, the boss works or is understanding.

    Two years ago, during the iced over 4 days, it was a Wednesday night that I was scheduled. The ice came in very early Tuesday mornng(3am or so) and on Wednesday morning, the ICU manager was calling my house..about 7am. She left a message and I called her immediately back. She asked me if I would make it to work that night(12 hours from that time...from 45 miles out, on a dead end gravel road that goes up and down and around hill and dale to get even to a farm to market road.) I told her "not unless it thaws today", she said that it wasn't expected to thaw today, so was I calling in? (At 7am when SHE called ME?) I said I guessed that I was, since there was no way to get there. She tells me that weather should have been anticipated, I should have come to the hospital and stayed through the duration in order to work my shift. I ask, well, are we still not allowed to bring our kids?(Single mom, 4 kids, very rural where power was out multiple times during this, water and heat depend on power, water lines freeze and have to be thawed via a small camp fire in the well house...etc) She says of course you can't bring your kids, this is a HOSPITAL. I tell her, well, then, I guess I am calling in. She says that weather will no longer be considered an acceptable reason for call ins, each weather related call in will be counted as 2 call ins for the quarter. I ask, what am I supposed to do? I have kids. She says "Well, I have dogs, and I had to leave them in the garage with food, and I wasn't happy about that".

    I still have the original message saved.



    Quote from monkeybug
    Based on the thank you card thread, what's the most bizarre thing said to you by management or administration? I can think of a few that will always stand out in my mind.



    When discussing our patient satisfaction surveys, our manager told me in a staff meeting, "Monkeybug, a patient would much rather have a nice nurse than a smart one. They don't care how smart you are, it doesn't matter. The "little things" are what matter! In fact, a family probably wouldn't care if you killed a patient if you were a really sweet nurse." My reply was rather colorful, and culminated with me saying, "give me the smart ***** any day if I'm the patient."

    I had a negative survey once because the patient had rolling veins. The patient's comment was that I should have kept this from happening. I asked manager how I was to do this, for future reference. "Well, of course, you can't control rolling veins. But I'm sure if you just apologized enough, you wouldn't get these negative comments!" (my only negative that quarter, but enough of an issue to get called to the office)
  5. 5
    Quote from thebackrow
    I had an employee health nurse tell my group in a updated educational session " There is no such thing as a violent ER Patient". Her statement was met with a round of laughter and jeers yelling " you have obviously never been in the ER!"
    I actually guffawed
  6. 12
    Quote from x4livin
    I ask, what am I supposed to do? I have kids. She says "Well, I have dogs, and I had to leave them in the garage with food, and I wasn't happy about that".
    Was she suggesting you do the same with your kids? Here's a bucket of soup and here's a bucket to potty in - don't mix 'em up!
  7. 4
    We will never get an unstable pediatric patient on my floor... ANY patient can go unstable at any time, and I know peds can turn quickly on you!
  8. 9
    What I *don't* miss about the hospital are the "flavor of the week" patient relation initiatives. I remember once we were told we needed to sit on the edge of the bed, hold the pt's hand and have a "caring conversation" once a shift.

    Say what you will about LTC, but at
    least we don't have to put up with any of that nonsense.
  9. 3
    My uncle died after 9 weeks in CCU and several ups and downs. My mom was a wreck losing her brother, especially since it was the same way their dad had died and in the same hospital. I took the day off (I'd been up till 3 a.m. waiting for the call because I knew they were taking him off the vent and d/c his pacemaker) because I was worn out and my mom was in shock and her house had been volunteered for food dropoffs and I helped her at home. I went to work the next day but had to leave 15 minutes early to be at the funeral home for the viewing, then took the next day off for the funeral. My doc I worked for apparently asked the manager why I needed two days off when it was just an uncle. My family is very close and he was another father figure. When it was time for us to review our time sheets I had to beg to use PTO for those two days. Manager gave me one day PTO because it wasn't immediate family, so I wouldn't get bereavement pay, and it wasn't an excused absence. Never mind that PTO is Paid Time Off and is supposed to be used for more than just sick with a doctor's note.
    nrsang97, ladyjedimaster, and Orca like this.
  10. 0
    Anyway, a nurse brought up the suggestion that she might be able to leave earlier if we had acuity-based assignments instead of blocks of rooms (i.e., currently one nurse has rooms 20-25, the next 26-31, etc. without regard to acuity; with acuity-based assignments, one nurse might have rooms 15, 19, 23, etc. which would result in fairer assignments).
    Assigning based upon room numbers makes for some screwy assignments. I worked for a reabilitation hospital, and our typical assignment was eight patients each, regardless of acuity. I looked at my assignment one day: seven diabetics and a tube feeder. The patients stayed with the rehab therapists right up until meal time, and they absolutely prohibited us from doing finger sticks in the rehab area. Fortunately I was working with our best CNA, who followed my instructions to the letter to not distribute a tray to anyone until I confirmed that I had done their accu-chek.


Top