What is the silliest complaint someone has ever made aboutyou? - page 5

I don't know what made me remember this but I had a coworker once with whom I had developed(I thought) something of a rapport. Well one day we were in the nurses' station and I jokingly made a... Read More

  1. by   penguin2
    I was a brand-new RN on a 50 bed surgical floor. My DON complained that I refused to take medication orders over the phone from an office nurse. I had taken all the other admitting orders, and when she started on the list of meds, I said, "um...I really need to get med orders from the doctor." The doc had complained to the DON who had a "chat" w/me. Apparently the doc wanted me to know that "orders from my nurse are just as good as orders from me"! Finally my DON admitted that they don't USUALLY give med orders via a nurse. Ya THINK?!
    Last edit by penguin2 on Dec 21, '06
  2. by   JohnBearPA
    I got written up for asking a CNA to retake vitals, when she handed me a paper with 9 names and VS, and they were all 98.6, 80, 20, 140/80. Also, said CNA was seen by myself writing down the whole list in the hallway right behind the nurses station (those round bubble mirrors come in handy sometimes.).

    Yeah, it could probably happen, but 9 pts with the same exact VS? I also offerred to show the CNA how to properly take a BP, and even offerred to let her use me for practice because my BP is really easy to hear, and she accused me of treating her as if I felt she was unprofessional, and untrained. I took the CNA into the med room privately and asked her to retake the VS, not in the hallway to be overheard by anyone else.

    I might add that I'm the only nurse that gave the CNA's report prior to them beginning work, am always willing to lend a hand and answer c/b's, and always invite the aides to see a cool tx or procedure if they want to. Also, I was a CNA for quite a few years before moving up to LPN, so I totally understand what they do and what their job is like.

    LOL, anyway, the write up was challenged by me, and dropped. NM suggested that next time, I just let the aides slide with VS and take them myself if they don't look right. DON stood behind me and suggested the NM retake the VS for me, because I was the only nurse that actually got done the majority of my work before shift change, and maybe the NM had more time than I did, because I was doing most of her chart reviews for her. NM hated me after that, but I don't work there anymore, so no biggie. LOL
  3. by   Insurance RN
    When I worked in MICU, a nurse from the ED complained that I asked too many questions during her report to me, guess I did not need to know VS, IV access, heart rhythm, etc.
  4. by   banditrn
    Quote from SharonH, RN
    I don't know what made me remember this but I had a coworker once with whom I had developed(I thought) something of a rapport. Well one day we were in the nurses' station and I jokingly made a comment about her not working hard. I forget my exact words but it was something along the lines of are you hardly working or working hard. You know that lame joke, well not that lame but it was harmless like that. Well a few days later, guess what I got invited to a meeting with her and the charge nurse to discuss my attempt to slander her! She said that she felt like I had a low opinion of her as a nurse and my comments left it open for people to believe that she was not a hard worker. And I was attempting to destroy her reputation as a nurse. As broadsided as I was, I apologized profusely for my faux-pas but she wasn't in a forgiving mood. So *shrug* what could I do? Obviously we weren't as good of friends as I thought or she might have given me the benefit of the doubt. Also she must have had a massively low self-esteem or insecurities if she was that bothered by my little joke. I just moved on. I can remember being quite annoyed at first but it's funny now.
    Sometimes I make impromtu remarks like that - one day I told another nurse that she had a smile that 'lit up the room' - she did, she had a lovely smile and all I wanted to do was compliment her on it.
    The next day, we ended up in the supervisors office - she said that I made that comment, but that she knew I didn't really mean it. I told her I wasn't in the habit of lying to people about things, but that she didn't need to worry - I'd never say anything nice to her again. Felt like I was in the Twilight Zone!

    The supervisor told me I had to have more 'respect' for my co-workers.
  5. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from Insurance RN
    When I worked in MICU, a nurse from the ED complained that I asked too many questions during her report to me, guess I did not need to know VS, IV access, heart rhythm, etc.
    I don't know the exact circumstances of your experience but the nurse I mentioned, who accused me of not liking her because I didn't look at her during report (we are all facing a wall, not each other) ALSO interrupts during report and that drives everyone crazy. Let me finish, then ask questions. It throws me off to be interrupted all the time.

    steph
  6. by   santhony44
    Quote from banditrn
    Sometimes I make impromtu remarks like that - one day I told another nurse that she had a smile that 'lit up the room' - she did, she had a lovely smile and all I wanted to do was compliment her on it.
    The next day, we ended up in the supervisors office - she said that I made that comment, but that she knew I didn't really mean it. I told her I wasn't in the habit of lying to people about things, but that she didn't need to worry - I'd never say anything nice to her again. Felt like I was in the Twilight Zone!

    The supervisor told me I had to have more 'respect' for my co-workers.

    That was a lovely compliment you gave her.

    Some people are just so bizarre!

    What on earth was disrespectful about that???
  7. by   lyceeboo
    Quote from medsurgnurse
    For our annual evals co-workers were chosen to submit peer comments. The peer comment was: " She doesn't spend any time socializing with co-workers." The manager told me this in all seriousness. I told her " I thought I was here to perform a job, if they want to socialize invite me after hours, and while they are socializing at an extended 90 minute lunch, I'm working by myself." Not working there anymore.
    Quote from Don3218
    I don't think I've ever received a formal complaint in my previous incarnation in administration. I did once, however, receive a puzzling comment in the "needs improvement" section of my annual performance review. My manager wrote that I wasn't social enough and that I needed to participate more in the chit-chat that goes on in the office. I asked her if I was rude; she said no. I asked her if my work was not being done; she said no. I asked her if my completed work was of poor quality; she said no. I asked her if someone complained; she said no. She said there wasn't anything wrong with my work, but that I just didn't seem to be anyone's friend. I told her then that I wasn't paid to be anybody's friend, and I was refusing to sign the evaluation until she changed that comment. She finally did, but not until several months later. I had a raise coming!
    That's funny. We do annual peer evals too and the comments about my nursing and pt care were very positive. The only complaints I got were "she's too serious." And "she needs to be part of the crowd and socialize more."

    Geee sorry if I'm not Jackie Chan. Some nurses can do it all and others have to focus to get everything done on time. Hey I'd try to chit-chat & socialize more but then I might be accused of being one of those nurses with a "fake smile." hehehe
  8. by   santhony44
    It's interesting that several people have posted about getting negative comments about not being social enough, and so forth.

    I think it's important to have a cordial relationship with my co-workers, and do sometimes make real friends with them. However, I have friends outside work (and outside the profession, for the most part). That's a part of my survival strategy. Having outside friends and interests helps keep me sane. Also, for the most part I choose to keep my private life private and don't discuss it at work.

    I've worked with some people who would tell everybody everything and I don't enjoy having to hear someone's personal details ad nauseum.

    I have to wonder if these "you're not social enough" people have outside lives and friends? I just don't understand where they're coming from!
  9. by   GardenDove
    The socializing can actually get entirely out of hand at nurses stations. I enjoy a little chit chat, but sometimes there is a gang mentality that supports goofing off.

    I have never had a pt complaint, I'm proud to say. But once I got written up, 3 pages narration style, by a brand new RN. I was working nights on med/surg, and there was a pt in for intractable back pain. She had an order from PT to always make her get up to the BSC and not use a bedpan. I heard in report that Mildred (fake name), the drill sargent older CNA from days, had "taken away the bedpan" and we were not to use it! Mildred loved to boss everyone around, pts, nurses, even docs.

    It was a busy night, and the doctor wouldn't give this woman, who was A&O x 3, any more pain med. I told the night aide, let's use the bedpan for the night, it's a PT order and we don't do PT at night. The pt was rather enormous and it was difficult for her to get up, required 2 person assist, she had a bariatric BSC even. The pt also requested a bedpan, and didn't want to get up, which I charted. (Pt rights!)

    She had used the bedpan in the night and had called when she was done. Well, apparently the aide put her on the bedpan at shift change, the day shift didn't check, the pt fell asleep, and they didn't discover the bedpan until they got the pt up for breakfast. The new RN called over the other RN on duty, who was also rather new. The bedpan was imprinted on the woman's very large buttocks (naturally) so they actually called the nursing supervisor over. Then, when the Doc arrived, they had her look at the woman's buttocks, but according to the write up the imprint had faded by then.

    When I got the write up in my box, I was really p!ssed off, I vented about it all night at the nurses station. The night supervisor just laughed it off and said "Just say you didn't even put the pt on the bedpan", which I did, I'm sure my manager didn't take it seriously but had to solicit my response to it.
    Last edit by GardenDove on Dec 21, '06
  10. by   lyceeboo
    Quote from santhony44
    It's interesting that several people have posted about getting negative comments about not being social enough, and so forth.

    I think it's important to have a cordial relationship with my co-workers, and do sometimes make real friends with them. However, I have friends outside work (and outside the profession, for the most part).

    I have to wonder if these "you're not social enough" people have outside lives and friends? I just don't understand where they're coming from!
    I totally agree. I do think it's important to have friends and close relationships with people outside of work. And it's important to be cordial but I'm not such a great multi-tasker that I can joke around a lot and get all of my work done. Different strokes for different folks.

    One nurse I worked with told me that since she's divorced and her family has moved away that our co-workers were her ONLY family. (She was a big gossip and really into every little thing that happened on the unit.) I guess the gossiping got to be too much for management because her "family" fired her.
  11. by   AngelaSPN
    I work in a lock down alzheimers unit at a nursing home. we usually keep our med cart behind the nurses station so the residents won't mess with it. recently i had my relief, the 11-7 nurse complain that i put too many cups on the med cart. i thought to myself, you should consider yourself lucky that i take the time out to stock the medcart cause a lot of nurses dont. i put so many cups on the med cart because it seems like i'm the only one that stocks the cart. i don't have time every day to go off the unit to get supplies.
  12. by   BJLynn
    A nurse complained one time that I had given a flu shot two days early (it was scheduled on the MAR), and had NOT signed it off. This was brought to my attention by the DON. I laughed, and explained the chain of events:

    The resident in question was a lady who desperately wanted to get out of a flu shot. So she told the nurse on duty I had given it two days before. The nurse on duty called me at home and asked me if I had given it on such and such date. I said, no, and I had not even been in the building or at work that day.

    Other nurse: Are you sure you didn't give it to her?
    Me: Yes
    Other nurse: So you are calling Mrs. So&So a liar?
    Me: No, I'm telling you she is mistaken. I gave her her two shots of insulin in her ABDOMEN, but no flu shot in her arm.
    Other nurse: Ok, somebody is lying and I'm confused.

    Apparently she told the DON I had given it to the patient, I just couldn't remember or was lying about it.

    DON: You have a complaint against you. Another nurse said you gave a flu shot and didn't sign it off.
    Me: Well if I managed to do that one, you have a lot of staff that are quite lax in their jobs and shouldn't be quite so worried about me.
    DON: How so?
    Me: That was my day off. If I did it, it means I snuck in the employee door, past the west station, took the medroom keys from the nurse on duty without her noticing, got into the medroom, and then snuck back down the hall, past the nurses station, past about 6 rooms, into this lady's room, gave her the shot, then back up to the med room, disposed of the needle, gave the keys back to the nurse on duty, then snuck out again past the nurses station that is btw, across from the ASSISTED DINING ROOM at DINNER TIME no less, all without ANYONE besides the patient in question seeing me. I'm good but I'm not THAT good.
    DON: I see. Let's just forget this conversation happened. I will give the shot and document it tonite.
  13. by   AliRae
    PICU nurse here. I once sent an 18-year old young man to the floor without having given him a full bed bath. Background? He was in for a head injury after getting in a drunken brawl. His mother repeatedly demanded throughout the day that I give her son "his sponge bath." Every time I asked him if he wanted to get washed up, he said no. I left the supplies and linens in his room in case his mother got industrious, but that apparently wasn't part of her plan. I offered for the tech to get him washed up, but the mother refused to let her in the room. (She was mad because the tech had asked her not to go onto the CLOSED side of the unit to raid the fridge there.) Oh, and also? The 2 kids on either side of him were both having great days- one was a hem-onc kid we were signing a DNR on, and the other was coding. My hands were full.

    I sent the kid down to the floor, only to have their head nurse call me up and berate me over the phone. She told me I was a bad nurse and told me that my nursing was "trash." I was only about a month off orientation at the time, so I had a long cry about that one! I think she expected me to troop down there and give the kid his precious bath myself! To this day, some of the floor nurses will ask me if my kids are bathed when I'm giving report...

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