It is time for a change folks....

  1. 4
    So I have been at this for two years now.....

    And still.....

    For the most part the nurse managers seem to adhere to the nurse ratchet mindset. In addition, they seem to favor staff who are also little nurse ratchets.....

    Then when the surveys come back, they are stunned and huddle us up, dumbfounded as to why their results are so horrible....

    It is time for nurse ratchet to go to pasture.

    Today is the day of providing great customer service while providing great nursing care...

    Deal with it....
    poppycat, Anonymous865, LadyFree28, and 1 other like this.
  2. 27 Comments so far...

  3. 13
    "Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely."

    John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton, 1st Baron Acton
    jadelpn, MauraRN, Surprised1, and 10 others like this.
  4. 2
    It is not that they are corrupted or not nice people. They just feel that basically patients surrender their rights upon admission and that the patient should do exactly as they say. This is not congruent with how new grads are being taught and leads to much tension between experienced indigenous staff and the incoming new grads.....
    Nola009 and Anonymous865 like this.
  5. 5
    One example is that my boss wants every pt bed alarmed. Well if I have an alert and oriented 50 y/o college professor as a pt that is 100 percent participatory with our fall management program, there is no way I will insult their dignity by placing an alarm on them....I could give thousands of similar examples....
    poppycat, Anonymous865, LTCNS, and 2 others like this.
  6. 19
    To be in absolute control and being punitive with the patients/staff if they don't behave...is an abuse of power.

    I have to say of my bed was alarmed while in the hospital you bet I'd be turning it off.

    These control power freaks...I have seen them. Administration loves them. They are for the most part Yes men in the board room. They never argue or try to use common sense. They gather all their little friends (the popular mean girls) like they did in high school or college to bully/intimidate by group mentality. It really grates on my nerves.
    returnednurse, SHGR, MauraRN, and 16 others like this.
  7. 7
    Quote from mindlor
    One example is that my boss wants every pt bed alarmed. Well if I have an alert and oriented 50 y/o college professor as a pt that is 100 percent participatory with our fall management program, there is no way I will insult their dignity by placing an alarm on them....I could give thousands of similar examples....
    Just remind TPTB that every patient has the right to refuse any treatment or device. Including bed alarms on a competent individual; if they insist you infringe on those rights and place a device against that patient's will, they ought to be prepared for the ensuing complaints and perhaps even lawsuit to follow. Been there, done that, and eventually stupidity goes by the wayside. Poor staffing levels, however, are always here to stay!
  8. 11
    I disagree that it is my job to provide "great customer service". They are my patients, not my customers.
    LisalaRN99, jadelpn, MauraRN, and 8 others like this.
  9. 3
    Not to be petty but it's Nurse RacheD. I alwasy heard it as 'ratchet' as in 'hatchet', which is more like her character, until I was recently corrected. It was disappointing to me, actually. It took away some of the spookines of the character.
    Emergent, Fiona59, and Hygiene Queen like this.
  10. 2
    Quote from LPNMary
    Not to be petty but it's Nurse RacheD. I alwasy heard it as 'ratchet' as in 'hatchet', which is more like her character, until I was recently corrected. It was disappointing to me, actually. It took away some of the spookines of the character.
    "Ratched"
    NurseDirtyBird and poppycat like this.
  11. 1
    Quote from Nurse Ratched.
    http://www.shmoop.com/one-flew-over-...on-quotes.html

    Quote #2Admission. Everybody stops playing cards and Monopoly, turns toward the day-room door. Most days I'd be out sweeping the hall and see who they're signing in, but this morning, like I explain to you, the Big Nurse put a thousand pounds down me and I can't budge out of the chair. Most days I'm the first one to see the Admission, watch him creep in the door and slide along the wall and stand scared till the black boys come sign for him and take him into the shower room, where they strip him and leave him shivering with the door open while they all three run grinning up and down the halls looking for the Vaseline. "We need that Vaseline," they'll tell the Big Nurse, "for the thermometer." She looks from one to the other: "I'm sure you do," and hands them a jar holds at least a gallon, "but mind you boys don't group up in there." Then I see two, maybe all three of them in there, in that shower room with the Admission, running that thermometer around in the grease till it's coated the size of your finger, crooning, "Tha's right, mothah, that's right," and then shut the door and turn all the showers up to where you can't hear anything but the vicious hiss of water on the green tile. I'm out there most days, and I see it like that. (1.2.5)
    Controlling the asylum patient through fear and intimidation begins from the moment they arrive on the ward.


    i want my cigarettes - YouTube
    Ha ha, here's a fun clip from the movie One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.
    NurseDirtyBird likes this.


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