Should i go over my manager's head - page 5

by Ladybluebell

7,721 Views | 66 Comments

I have been having issues with my manager for a while now, and i am reaching the point of no return. I think she wants to get rid of me and i dont know what to do. I started on this floor as a new RN seven years ago and loved it... Read More


  1. 0
    At my last hospital managers were required to go to at least one room that we were assigned and ask pt how they felt about the care they were receiving. We also could not have any drinks ANYWHERE but the break room. If they found drink, it was trashed immediately, no questions asked. Also, handwashing has and should always be a biggy! HCAPS is here to stay and when a hospital's reimbursement depends on those scores, you can bet it is only going to get worse.
  2. 0
    Although I have never been in this situation before, personally I would mention it to the union with the other nurses support, and then go further. Just have the unions support behind you (I'm not a huge union person, but they are there for a reason)
  3. 0
    Quote from Do-over
    I've just got to add (as a former manager in a totally unrelated field) that if "everyone" "loves" the "sweetheart" of a manager... Well, then that manager is probably not terribly effective. If everyone likes you, then you aren't doing your job.

    Managers aren't there to win popularity contests - they are there to manage and ensure that things happen according to the company plan. Its not an easy job, especially when it is done well...

    And, sometimes people need and deserve to be fired - even if they've been around for a hundred years. It is never easy or fun ot fire someone, and maybe the new sheriff in town will take care of some things that the former manager let slide.
    If a manager is well-liked, maybe it's because she's a happy person, not a psycho who wants to hurt others or strut about like a power-mad dictator. Maybe she trusts her staff and respects them and doesn't breathe down their necks, is available for counsel, consultation, guidance, can be approached without staff having to fear they'll be looked down upon for seeking help, and so on. Oh, gee, it sounds like the land of Oz, sorry.
  4. 0
    Another thing to remember if you are going to meet with your nurse manager is to take ownership of the problem. When I have had to coach staff, I find that those individuals who are accountable and willing to take at least part of the responsibility for the situation show improvement. Those who come into a coaching session with the attitude that all of the issues are someone else's fault will not be willing to work to improve their own behaviors.
  5. 0
    If you want to stay in the position, I'd work at getting on your new manager's good side. Thank her when she offers you the critical feedback and adjust your behavior based on that. You might even talk with her and let her know you want to start anew. If you go over her head, you might get into more hot water. The items she wrote you up for were valid. No one is perfect...everyone makes a mistake. If she caught a miss, just own up to it and be more careful... She may be going after you harder per your attitude. Let go of it. It's doing you no good... It can be hard to do...but it will likely only help you...

    Good luck!
  6. 3
    Quote from Kooky Korky
    If a manager is well-liked, maybe it's because she's a happy person, not a psycho who wants to hurt others or strut about like a power-mad dictator. Maybe she trusts her staff and respects them and doesn't breathe down their necks, is available for counsel, consultation, guidance, can be approached without staff having to fear they'll be looked down upon for seeking help, and so on. Oh, gee, it sounds like the land of Oz, sorry.
    Well, that is easy enough if one believes that management is always wrong/evil/stupid/corrupt and that the "little guy" is always getting the shaft...

    If anyone knows of a place where all employees behave like adults and no one ever needs discipline - send me a PM so I know where to submit my resume.

    Still, my personal experience in life (and this ain't my first rodeo) is that "psycho" managers are more in the minority and are far outnumbered by mediocre to sub-par employees. But, I am certainly not saying it doesn't happen - I've seen it and have had to clean up the considerable mess left behind.

    FWIW, which is probably not much, my manager is well-liked and respected by me. I don't mind when she shows up on the off-shift (because I am not screwing around on my I-phone all night). I also appreciate the chance to work with her. At the same time, I know there are others who think she is on a crazy power-trip. Perhaps the same ones that are too busy updating facebook to answer call-lights?

    PS-for political correctness - I am not implying that the OP is mediocre or sub-par.
    Esme12, Teacher Sue, and Nascar nurse like this.
  7. 2
    Quote from Kooky Korky
    If a manager is well-liked, maybe it's because she's a happy person, not a psycho who wants to hurt others or strut about like a power-mad dictator. Maybe she trusts her staff and respects them and doesn't breathe down their necks, is available for counsel, consultation, guidance, can be approached without staff having to fear they'll be looked down upon for seeking help, and so on. Oh, gee, it sounds like the land of Oz, sorry.
    I was thinking along those lines, too. There is a lot that is unsaid about the incidents the OP related. I don't know where people got the idea that the manager who was retired was fired, that patients were complaining about poor care, or that the OP is setting a bad example for student nurses reading this thread because she was written up for not washing her hands and being rude to students when I don't think we have enough detail about those events to say for sure at this point. I do know that it never hurts to tell your new unit (if you are the new manager) things to smooth your path as far as different styles, different personaiities.
    Last edit by nursel56 on Apr 30, '12
    Kooky Korky and wooh like this.
  8. 2
    Quote from Do-over
    Well, that is easy enough if one believes that management is always wrong/evil/stupid/corrupt and that the "little guy" is always getting the shaft...

    If anyone knows of a place where all employees behave like adults and no one ever needs discipline - send me a PM so I know where to submit my resume.

    Still, my personal experience in life (and this ain't my first rodeo) is that "psycho" managers are more in the minority and are far outnumbered by mediocre to sub-par employees. But, I am certainly not saying it doesn't happen - I've seen it and have had to clean up the considerable mess left behind.

    FWIW, which is probably not much, my manager is well-liked and respected by me. I don't mind when she shows up on the off-shift (because I am not screwing around on my I-phone all night). I also appreciate the chance to work with her. At the same time, I know there are others who think she is on a crazy power-trip. Perhaps the same ones that are too busy updating facebook to answer call-lights?

    PS-for political correctness - I am not implying that the OP is mediocre or sub-par.
    I don't believe managers are always wrong, evil, etc. I just have seen my share of people who were unhappy in their personal lives and brought that to the job. I've known of managers having illicit relations with subordinates or with their superiors, managers who were drug-addicted, stealing, drinking, and so on. In other words, managers who were not in any position to lead, to do evaluations, to be role models or coaches, managers who knew only how to do write-up's.


    Let me add that staff who work nights or evenings or only weekends do it for various reasons. Like maybe it's a 2nd job or there are babysitting/child care reasons, or transportation reasons. Or maybe the worker is just a natural night owl or evening bloomer. Does everyone who isn't on M-F day shift have to be hiding out or
    hiding some terrible secret?

    Wow, what a scary attitude. Who should care for the patients on Eve's and Nights? It's like people thinking that teachers can't actually do anything. I guess some people might be hiding out, but not all off-shift workers are doing that.

    I ask those here who hold this view to think a little more broadly - and more charitably. And thank off-shift workers for being there for the patients at whatever hour necessary.
    Not_A_Hat_Person and nursel56 like this.
  9. 0
    I did what most of you here thought i should do and went to my manager. We had our meeting today and it started off ok. She said she was glad i came to her. She said she values my experience. then she gave me this list of her expectations and had me sign apaper she called a comitment to my coworkers about getting along with everybody. She said we can meet evey 2 weeks to "reveiw' my performance. I agreed to all of this. I signed her paper. After all of this she still wouldnt sign my step two renewal. So after i "humbled" myself and jumped though her hoops, i got nowhere anyway. She said i need to show "sustained improvement" and she will reveiw my step two in six months. So that means i will take a 5 percent pay cut. I will do what i need to do here for now, but as soonas i find another job, im gone.
  10. 4
    BlueBell, this is probably the best outcome you should expect. I outlined this in my advice to you and suggested that you try to achieve the goals that your manager would develop for you. This is 'step 1' in the process, and the easiest of all the steps to accomplish. It's easy to make promises; more difficult to carry through with them.

    Your manager sees some deficiencies in your work; it seems she's very concerned about your ability to get along with others. When you meet with her in two weeks, she'll give you feedback about your progress. Even at the two week mark, you're far from 'out of the woods'. It's very realistic to expect her to consider signing your step-two renewal in 6 months--after you've not only shown change, but become reliable in that change.

    From a management point of view, if she was considering terminating you it would be very difficult to go to her supervisors and request that you be let go if she had just promoted you or given you a salary increase. That would be very inconsistent and would look extremely indecisive on her part... like, "Last month you gave her a raise, and now you want to fire her?!?!?!"

    Clearly, you manager had some serious issues with your work and ability to get along with colleagues. Had you not gone to her you probably would have been unemployed in the near future. If you can make significant changes and maintain those new work habits you'll be OK. If not, you would likely take your bad work habits with you to a new employer and find yourself in the same situation. History has a way of repeating itself if you don't make decisive and genuine changes.


Top