Rude Cna To Nurses - page 3

I am working in a unit with only one regular tech in our shift who is efficient and hardworking, but she has a hell of an attitude. I am barely new to the unit but I think I can't take it anymore. ... Read More

  1. by   Repat
    Well, I have just left a job for this very reason. I requested meetings with the NM, who refused to meet with us all together, and proceeded to tell me what a good influence this tech was for the unit. It turns out the tech had been fired at one point, and her family threatened to sue for wrongful dismissal, so there she sits in all her glory, running people off (I am not the first one, others have told me). However, I do not go to work to be demeaned and belittled, so I quit. If the organization wants to lose an RN rather than an aide, good luck to them (half the floor is leaving due to negative atmosphere in the extreme).
  2. by   Justus
    "It turns out the tech had been fired at one point, and her family threatened to sue for wrongful dismissal..."
    How old was the tech that her family could sue in her place?
    "However, I do not go to work to be demeaned and belittled, so I quit."
    Have felt this too, responded the same way and still regret it. It is a shame that we come into this with the greatest of intent and nobility only to be shown how replaceable we are. As if! It is their loss, keep going you will find a place that appreciates all you have to offer and if they fail to see it...(see end of post)!
    "If the organization wants to lose an RN rather than an aide..."
    It is unfortunate for any organization to lose qualified / professonal staff regardless of their position.But what does Nurse vs. Aid have to do with it? Not being persnickety but this is a common attitude that I do not share or understand.What makes a Nurse better? A college education, income, power? (Again, I mean this in the kindest way) For me to claim some egotistical superiority over an aid is rediculous, are children less valuable because their not adults? Albeit, they may lack the wisdom that comes with age I can hardly imagine a world without them.

    {sitting on the fence,taken it all in }
    It seems that some Aids are more assertive than their more educated counterparts and being a Nurse does not make you a leader. eek...this makes for bad chemistry.

    Whether your a Nurse, tech. or housekeeper you are taken under wing by the senior employees to learn all the ropes that don't necessarily go by the book. Nevermind what employee X thinks you "should do", stick to the book! Trust yourself and your educated training first and foremost, if you can't do that you're not ready for an authoritive role. There's no shame in it, better to admit it then run amuck.

    {bloody longwinded! sorry}
    This is a pet peeve, I hate that we keep losing good nurses,cna's etc. to bad management. If we keep allowing ourselves to be shoved aside for those that are unprofessional even incompetent then how are things ever going to get better? STEP ON THEIR TOES! Post on top of post speaks of how tiring this is to all of us and yet we do nothing because we're somehow inferior ,defeated or "in this alone"?

    {tugging on jack boots}
    Who's got my back?
    Last edit by Justus on May 6, '04
  3. by   Repat
    I certainly didn't mean it in a superiority way (about losing a nurse vs. a CNA), but in a financial way - they oriented me for 6 weeks, sent me to a 2-week critical care course, and certified me in BLS/ACLS. An awful lot of money invested in me due to my position on the staff (and the other nurses, not just me). The CNA's, while they are required to be certified, do not attend those classes at the hospital's expense, and while they also require orientation, it is usually two weeks long.
  4. by   Justus
    :imbar Did not mean to offend. I'm sorry.
    Truely, just went through very similar circumstance and it is so frustrating that it has become common or much worse acceptable! From bottom to top everyone is complaining about how awful nursing has become.
    I have acute Nightengale Syndrome highly irritated by this infection of bad nursing, bad management and overall b.s.! We need a bloody antibiotic that will drive these little germs out of the system and allow nursing in its truest form to recover and prosper as prescribed by everyone of us that is worth our Caduceus! {LOL-although I am serious}
    Again, I apologize- I did understand your post and feelings therein.
  5. by   missmercy
    I don't really care as much about what title the person has ( I'd be just as torqued IF another nurse was puttin' on the tude". ) It is just plain wrong for ANY person, regardless of education, social status, financial standing or whatever, to belittle and insult another person. Doing so in front of patients and students ( or anybody for that matter) makes it even MORe unacceptable. We have some attitudinal issues here too -- I have to say that Iagree with the posts that are advising to get with the DON or manager and expose the behavior ASAP. It isn't tatteling -- it is holding another person accountable for their actions!! We've talked to our aides, our nurses, our volunteers, our techs, our transporters, and even our doctors! Common courtesy and professionalism are not optional!! They should be as much a requirement for maintaining a position here as obeying the law, accurate and complete documentation and/or competent care!!!
  6. by   Repat
    Thanks - no offense taken! :kiss
  7. by   Mandarella
    You're absolutely right. No matter what your title you shouldn't belittle anyone and you shouldn't accept it either. Draw the line-it does make for a better working environment. When I go to work I don't try to guess whether I am going to do actual work or not. So there's no surprise there, I know my job and I know what is expected of me...Maybe a job description needs to be pulled out as a refresher. (not by you though-that may be a little hostile) GOOD LUCK!!!


    description
    Quote from LPN2Be2004
    With ANY job title, no one should stand for it!
    Last edit by mandarellas on May 6, '04
  8. by   Justus
    Ladies- you are the tops and point on! I would be honored to work with you!
  9. by   Stitchie
    Quote from Justus
    "It turns out the tech had been fired at one point, and her family threatened to sue for wrongful dismissal..."
    How old was the tech that her family could sue in her place?
    "However, I do not go to work to be demeaned and belittled, so I quit."
    Have felt this too, responded the same way and still regret it. It is a shame that we come into this with the greatest of intent and nobility only to be shown how replaceable we are. As if! It is their loss, keep going you will find a place that appreciates all you have to offer and if they fail to see it...(see end of post)!
    "If the organization wants to lose an RN rather than an aide..."
    It is unfortunate for any organization to lose qualified / professonal staff regardless of their position.But what does Nurse vs. Aid have to do with it? Not being persnickety but this is a common attitude that I do not share or understand.What makes a Nurse better? A college education, income, power? (Again, I mean this in the kindest way) For me to claim some egotistical superiority over an aid is rediculous, are children less valuable because their not adults? Albeit, they may lack the wisdom that comes with age I can hardly imagine a world without them.

    {sitting on the fence,taken it all in }
    It seems that some Aids are more assertive than their more educated counterparts and being a Nurse does not make you a leader. eek...this makes for bad chemistry.

    Whether your a Nurse, tech. or housekeeper you are taken under wing by the senior employees to learn all the ropes that don't necessarily go by the book. Nevermind what employee X thinks you "should do", stick to the book! Trust yourself and your educated training first and foremost, if you can't do that you're not ready for an authoritive role. There's no shame in it, better to admit it then run amuck.

    {bloody longwinded! sorry}
    This is a pet peeve, I hate that we keep losing good nurses to bad management. If we keep allowing ourselves to be shoved aside for those that are unprofessional even incompetent then how are things ever going to get better? STEP ON THEIR TOES! Post on top of post speaks of how tiring this is to all of us and yet we do nothing because we're somehow inferior ,defeated or "in this alone"?

    {tugging on jack boots}
    Who's got my back?
    Having worked as a tech thru nursing school I often felt that I was talked down to by particular nurses I worked with. I had to prove myself. There is also that 'tech thing' that says make life miserable for the new people, so they don't ask for help from you. Uh huh. But working as a tech made me a better RN, although I worked with my own philosophy: "Keep the RN out of the room as much as possible".

    The reason that no facility wants to lose an RN is: the hospital cannot function without RN's. The hospital can function without NA's, although it isn't pretty. It's called primary nursing.

    There is also a small bit of Magnet Status consideration. Nursing turnover is one of the things that the Magnet gurus look at. If there is high nursing turnover, then there is something wrong with the unit.

    It's not that I don't appreciate my NA's. I do, the hardworking, no sarcasm, no attitude dependable ones are a treasure and make the unit run more efficiently. But the next time I see one of them on the phone talking about movies or what they're doing after work or on the weekend, I may just open up a can of whup-arse. It's infuriating to see this -- in fact, also my fellow RN's -- act this way when I'm lucky if I get a chance to go to the bathroom.
  10. by   tattooednursie
    I am a CNA myself, and I would never treat my nurses that way. If they ask me to do something, I do it, whether I like it or not. If I am indeed to busy, I make that politley known.
    On the other hand, it is a two way street. I think nurses shouldn't be unkind to the CNA's. I'm not saying that YOU aren't. Infact your putting up with alot of BS from a CNA that you should not need to deal with. I'm just saying that from a POV od another CNA, cause we do have a rough job.
    I wish that we could ALL work in harmony, but there has to be that one person who makes it all so unpleasant

    I hope that CNA cleans up her act. she does not have the right. I'm sure she'd treat her fellow CNA's the same way.
  11. by   Justus
    Quote from Stitchie
    Having worked as a tech thru nursing school I often felt that I was talked down to by particular nurses I worked with. I had to prove myself. There is also that 'tech thing' that says make life miserable for the new people, so they don't ask for help from you. Uh huh. But working as a tech made me a better RN, although I worked with my own philosophy: "Keep the RN out of the room as much as possible".

    I was speaking of the nurses etc. that feel the need to do the "tech thing" whether they're doing it to a newbie or a seasoned nurse,cna etc. It should not be acceptable at anytime to anyone.

    The reason that no facility wants to lose an RN is: the hospital cannot function without RN's. The hospital can function without NA's, although it isn't pretty. It's called primary nursing.

    Personally speaking I have never worked without CNAs and wouldn't want to. My point was that one is needed as much as the other. ie.( considering staff shortages could the hosp. function more or less effectively without CNAs?)

    There is also a small bit of Magnet Status consideration. Nursing turnover is one of the things that the Magnet gurus look at. If there is high nursing turnover, then there is something wrong with the unit.

    It's not that I don't appreciate my NA's. I do, the hardworking, no sarcasm, no attitude dependable ones are a treasure and make the unit run more efficiently. But the next time I see one of them on the phone talking about movies or what they're doing after work or on the weekend, I may just open up a can of whup-arse. It's infuriating to see this -- in fact, also my fellow RN's -- act this way when I'm lucky if I get a chance to go to the bathroom.
    Not sure I understand, is that to say that you would open the can on a CNA and overlook your fellow RNs? I agree that it is "infuriating" and there is no room for it. Which brings me back, yet again, to why is this type thing so common and acceptable? Many times I have proposed that this among more offensive things should be stopped, that regardless of position we have the means to clean up healthcare/nursing...and yet nobody has agreed or disagreed.
    Last edit by Justus on May 6, '04
  12. by   Stitchie
    Quote from Justus
    Not sure I understand, is that to say that you would open the can on a CNA and overlook your fellow RNs? I agree that it is "infuriating" and there is no room for it. Which brings me back, yet again, to why is this type thing so common and acceptable? Many times I have proposed that this among more offensive things should be stopped, that regardless of position we have the means to clean up healthcare/nursing...and yet nobody has agreed or disagreed.
    It's not just the aids, or housekeeping, or nurses or docs. We all have a part, we really are part of a team. Nowhere is this more evident in a code situation. If we practiced that level of teamwork on a regular basis, we would fix many of the problems.

    I once read a poem about good nursing (can't recall where) that said something about no nurse (in any capacity) having a bad day unless all the nurses were having a bad day.

    'Work ethic' is sadly missing among many in healthcare today. This is not directed at you, but rather from what I have observed from working in three different hospitals (all of them v. different).

    There are those who are there to collect a paycheck and treat support staff as a means to an end and/or their personal slaves, there are those who are there to collect a paycheck but have a good work ethic, and there are those who think of nursing as a 'calling'.

    Personally I like to think that I fall into the second category: I do my job, I expect to be paid fairly and I expect this behavior from others on the floor. That means, if I'm drowning (I work ED, I'm new to the ED, so I drown on nearly a daily basis) I expect, if I ask for help, someone to help me out, without snide remarks or comments. I expect them to ask, "is there anything else I can do?".

    I want my co-workers, whatever their capacity, to be polite, considerate and to clean up after themselves. I want them to acknowledge a fault and fix it. I want them to come to me, f2f, and acknowlege any fault/problem/issue/omission of mine, workwise, so that I am able to fix it, instead of going behind my back to the NM or CN. I do not want to be the target or receiver of gossip and backbiting. I want to be part of the solution, not the problem.

    How we go about doing that is more of a topic for a Ph.D. dissertation than a quick fix on a BB, but maybe here's a good place to start.

    What we need is for each of us to go to work today tomorrow and every day with a decision to help each other out when possible, to can the 'tude, to speak kindly to and about each other. Also, to confront appropriately and kindly with the idea that you're giving an opportunity to improve rather than to cut someone down.

    Call me a Pollyanna, call me naive, but what really matters is doing our jobs with the end in mind -- good patient care. I enjoy my job, I want to enjoy my co-workers, but often it's difficult. IMO if I work in this capacity, then I can set my own tone and feel good about the way that I perform my job. At the end of the shift, that's all I can really do. Know that I did the best I could, and that I helped someone or made a difference, however small, for someone else. And did so without participating in the 'eating our young' that has become so obnoxiously prevalent in healthcare today.

    JMHO.
    Last edit by Stitchie on May 6, '04
  13. by   Yancy SPN
    [QUOTE I'm a cna and have been for 14 years and now and have chosen to go back to school to become a nurse finally. I'm not bagging on nurses because one day soon, I will be one, but let me tell ya, it's very hard and frustruating as well for a cna. Granted she shouldn't of had an attitude with the nurse, but I've seen alot of nurses that are the same way with the cna's. I've heard several times "that's not my job" from an RN or LPN, and I hope to God, I don't end up like that when I become a nurse. It takes teamwork between the nurses and the aides.

close