Representing yourself to the public as a nurse when you are not a nurse - page 4

A family member was recently seen in an ER. One of her care providers introduced himself as a "med tech" and the family member asked "What does that mean?" and the response was " it is the same thing... Read More

  1. Visit  lindarn profile page
    4
    I resent a medical assistant, with a minimal post HS education, telling patients, that he/she, is the, "same as a nurse". Excuse me???

    And we wonder why the general public, thinks that we are overpaid babysitters who wipe buts, and pass out ice water.

    He was completely out of line to tell a patient that his job is the same as a nurse. I don't expect a nurses aide, to go into a detailed account of the difference between their educational background, and an RN, but I do expect them to be truthful about what their job is.

    That is why you have patients and family members, complaining to management, about, "the nurse came in and did not fix my IV that was beeping, or give me pain medication". And all along, it was the housekeeper who came in to the room. But the patient's nurse gets yelled at, and chastized for not providing, "good customer service".

    JMHO and my NY $0.02.
    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Somewhere in the PACNW
    CherylRNBSN, Maritimer, FecesOccurs, and 1 other like this.
  2. Visit  meanmaryjean profile page
    1
    I worked with an RN once who continually introduced himself as a 'colleague of Dr. So and So', and kept his name badge turned backwards. Most family members took that to mean he was a physician. When he eventually got fired, that played a HUGE part in the decision.
    lindarn likes this.
  3. Visit  ckh23 profile page
    2
    Quote from ScottE
    How did they represent themselves as a nurse? When asked the person stated they were a Med Tech.
    This^
    canadiandude and Elladora like this.
  4. Visit  workingharder profile page
    0
    Quote from meanmaryjean
    I worked with an RN once who continually introduced himself as a 'colleague of Dr. So and So', and kept his name badge turned backwards. Most family members took that to mean he was a physician. When he eventually got fired, that played a HUGE part in the decision.
    And well he should. The word "colleague" implies equality. In your example the equality would have been professional. Nurses and physicians are not professionally equal. It seems the intent of your coworker was deception.
    I detected no intent of deception on the part of the OP's MedTech. It sounds like he was just another harried and overworked employee who was just trying to deflect a protracted explanation of the myriad of hospital employee job titles.
  5. Visit  lindarn profile page
    5
    But he described his job title, and therefore, and misrepresented, his skill level, and education, to be the same as an RN or LPN. When he stated that it was, "the same as a nurse", he was misrepresented himself. Go to a doctors' office, and see if the PA or NP, tells the patient that they are the, " same as a doctor". Or go to a law office, and see what happens if the Paralegal tells potential clients, that he/she, is, "just like a lawyer". Your head would roll. The fact that so many individuals don't care what this jerk calls himself, is what is wrong with nursing. We do not respect ourselves enough to get angry at a person who represents themselves as a nurse. And we wonder why the public doesn't care.
    Big difference in skill level and education.

    JMHO and my NY $0.02.
    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    somewhere in the PACNW
  6. Visit  Poochiewoochie profile page
    3
    Quote from lindarn
    I resent a medical assistant, with a minimal post HS education, telling patients, that he/she, is the, "same as a nurse". Excuse me???



    JMHO and my NY $0.02.
    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Somewhere in the PACNW
    I recently had a MA tell me that at my last appointment with my PCP. Even though she was an MA she basically did all the things a nurse did. Of course I now she was full of it. Funny part was she said that when she went to MA school she was told that after a certain amount of time on the job she could challenge the nursing board to take the test to become a LPN. When she tried to they laughed at her and said she had been lied to.

    Next time someone tells me that who is not actually a nurse I am going to tell them, no they aren't. Like someone said, if you went to a doctors office the PA or NP would not tell you they are the same as a doctor(even though I've encountered one or two that have been better than a lot of doctors I've seen) Not to diss the professions, but in most cases most of the PA's and NP's I've come across have been incompetent. The exception is my neurosurgeons PA.
    FecesOccurs, vintagemother, and lindarn like this.
  7. Visit  vintagemother profile page
    2
    This brings to mind a situation that occurred this weekend at work. I'm a CNA in an acute care hospital. I introduced myself as a CNA to the confused (demented) patient and his family. When the (adorable) confused pt asked his family who I was (not 1 minute after I introduced myself) they said, "she is your nurse." I never correct that kind of thing although I would NEVER say I'm a nurse or even "like a nurse". In a one on one situation, I'd just reiterate I'm your nursing assistant, but if they keep calling me a nurse, as often happens, I do not continually correct them. For the record though, I think it's innappropriate and wrong to say "I'm like a nurse". I want to be a nurse and respect the profession to much to demean it that way.
    lindarn and LPNnowRNhopefull like this.
  8. Visit  canadiandude profile page
    4
    Yup fill out the form so the person can lose their job hopefully youll sleep better at night
    Irish_Mist, Ruas61, LPNnowRNhopefull, and 1 other like this.
  9. Visit  amygarside profile page
    1
    I think it should be addressed and mentioned since it is not a good thing to misrepresent yourself. Nurses have a reputation to protect so it is best that your family member should really talk about this. It can help improve how personnel is being handled. If the position needs a nurse, then one should hire a nurse instead of other medical courses. Each medical care personnel has a responsibility, so it is best that job duties and responsibilities should be clearly defined.
    AheleneLPN likes this.
  10. Visit  nursel56 profile page
    3
    I'll sleep better at night knowing that someone who shades the truth or who is so dense they actually believe a med tech is the same thing as a nurse doesn't hold my life in his/her hands.
    Altra, lindarn, and FecesOccurs like this.
  11. Visit  Crazed profile page
    3
    Whoa remind me not to misspeak around any of you guys.

    I'm sure this was simply a case of the tech trying to stop the line of questioning. The term nurse is universal. How many times have we said, "Oh my kid/husband/dog/mom/neighbor is sick so I played nurse all weekend."

    Unless the tech had their badge turned, didn't say they were a med tech at first, and purposely misrepresented themselves I really don't think it's a big deal. I'm sure they know the difference between their job and the job of the RN - they have far less paperwork.
  12. Visit  jadelpn profile page
    3
    I am the tech, I am assisting the nurse in your care would have perhaps been a better response. HOWEVER,
    no reason to bait someone to get all flustered and attempt to explain and re-explain what apparently the OP family knew.
    I know the wait in the ED is sometimes long, but honestly, "lets fluster the staff" is not an appropriate time passer.
    Altra, lindarn, and Meriwhen like this.
  13. Visit  T-Bird78 profile page
    1
    I had just graduated nursing school and my aunt had a new job and was calling herself a nurse. She would talk about her patients (home health visits) and all she did for them and even showed up in her scrubs to my great-uncle's visitation to prove she had just gotten done with her patients. I kept telling my mom that she's not a nurse but my aunt kept saying that. I finally had a chance to ask what her title was, and she admitted PCA--patient care associate. She was similar to a CNA but only took a week-long training session from her employer. She'd go to the home and would hep bathe the patients and get them dressed and occasionally cleaned their kitchen or living room. She quit calling herself a nurse after I called her out on it. I was so frustrated that I had gone through all that and passed my NCLEX on the first try and she was basking in my glory by claiming my title.

    The local hospital has RNs and nurse techs. The RNs administer meds and change IV bags and note I&O but the nurse tech actually gets vitals and has to empty the I&O container. Not sure what the exact title of the "nurse tech" is.
    lindarn likes this.

Need Help Searching For Someone's Comment? Enter your keywords in the box below and we will display any comment that matches your keywords.



Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

Top
close
close