Prejudice Against Overweight Patients: An Issue To Ponder - page 7

Weight discrimination is the treatment of someone in an unfair manner due to the person's size. Even though extremely thin individuals are occasionally treated poorly due to their size, overweight... Read More

  1. Visit  MomRN0913 profile page
    1
    Weight needs to be addressed by a physician. I think that the physician wouldn't be doing their job if they didn't speak of modifying risk factors that affect health. of course there is a tactful way to do this, but it needs to be addressed.

    My dad's wife has a niece who is 8 now I believe.... she is morbidly obese. She has been quite heavy most of her child hood. Has asthma. According to her mother, the pediatrician never said anything about the child's weight. So she was assuming in her world of denial there was nothing wrong. That pediatrician should have explained how reduction in weight can improve the asthma symptoms. Not to mention how she is at risk for diabetes amongst other things.

    Doctors are too worried about "insulting" people these days. Well, it's more like saving lives to me, if done the right way.

    I don't think that nurses are predjudiced against obese people as a whole. Yes, there are people no matter what occupation they ahve that are, but I think nurses problems lie in the fact they it is stressful when they have to physically care for such overweight people. I have hurt myself before on obese patients in the ICU before. And yes, call me what you will but the thought has ran through my head that if they took better care of themselves and lost some weight, BOTH of us wouldn't be in this position. (and yes, the obese people I have said this about had modifiable means to their obesity. It had nothing to do with thyroid disorders or what not. It had to do with an unhealthy diet and no exercise)

    Mperhaps some education to the MD's on how to approach the subject of obesity and weight loss to their patients would be helpful.
    anotherone likes this.
  2. Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  3. Visit  edmia profile page
    1
    Quote from tothepointeLVN

    I think you need to stop thinking because what is coming out of your head is ignorant and insulting.

    Most obese people DO NOT eat entire bags of chips or whole pizzas. Are you kidding me? Where do you get your information from? TV?
    I think you need to educate yourself more. Food is absolutely an addiction whether you eats lots of it or the wrong kinds of it. Obesity is not normal. Stop defending it as it only hurts people suffering from unhealthy habits more.

    I would never say it is easy to loose weight. I personally have been trying to loose 40 lbs for 3 years and the truth is that I am not yet obese and I have not reached the point where I'm willing to stop using food as comfort and escape. I'm getting there as I see how terrible I look all the time. I look tired, my clothes don't fit and I'm not willing to buy size 14.

    So, I'm getting there. But I am definitely addicted to carbs -- and I know because when I've attempted to stop using carbs, I withdraw. I'm a nurse, I can recognize the symptoms of malaise, headache, intense cravings, talking myself out of not eating processed foods (oh, it's just a few chips with this healthy homemade salsa...), yet in the end, I go back and actually feel worse. Grains make me bloated, my bowel movements change, my skin reacts with rashes, mucous production increases in my body, but hey, I fed the monkey.

    Food addiction is real.

    Modern humans are all addicted to some type of food not meant for our body to process in some way or another. No matter how much you weigh.

    For now I'm starting slow by sticking to whole foods. Basically if I can't envision humans eating it or growing it thousands of years ago, I don't ingest it. And I'm weaning off grains to not crash and burn.

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com
    anotherone likes this.
  4. Visit  edmia profile page
    1
    Quote from Pets to People

    Sorry to burst you bubble, but the other poster was correct. I know this on a personal level and I watched a TV show this summer where part of the therapy is to put the entire days food that the particular obese person they are working with would eat throughout the day and compare it to a regular real life average weight person. The amount of food was astounding, even to the obese person, who had been diluting themselves about how much they ate.

    I am considering obese by the BMI scale, and I can tell you my husband would bring home a pizze and I could eat the entire thing exept for maybe one or two slices, which I would eat later when I got hungry again, oh like an hour later. I wouldn't sit and eat one slice of cake, I would have three, because it tasted soooo good. I could not only kill a bag of chips, I could kill a bag of chips with half a thing of ranch dip, then have dinner, desert and then several cups of coffee full of cream and sugar; I could eat a large big mac meal and barely feel full.

    It would take more of this type of crappy food that I ate to fill me up and this food never filled me up for very long because it was nothing but quick burning carbs. I would eat all day, like 6 meals or more a day like this. I was always hungry, sometimes I ate because I was bored, or depressed and sometimes I ate when I wasn't hungry just because the food was so yummy.

    You may never see this yourself because many overweight people hide their eating. I did, and often. I would eat at burger king on the way to school, then get there and get a meal from the cafeteria to take to class. I would wait til my family went to bed, then root around in the fridge to eat.

    People feel very quilty about this behavior...many know it's wrong and feel horrible that they seem helpless to stop it.

    Also, I can imagine that many obese people become easily offended because what you are telling them is something that they have already heard twenty times that day, from TV, to their family to some random person on the street.
    Thank you for sharing this.

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com
    anotherone likes this.
  5. Visit  bagladyrn profile page
    2
    What I am seeing on this thread is something that is very common in my experience with health care providers and exactly the kind of prejudice that affects their healthcare: someone tells you what the eat, their level of activity, their experience with various diets and the immediate reactions is "Yeah, right....". The assumption is always that they are lying, that they couldn't possibly be doing all that and still be overweight.
    I've given up discussing this with providers as it is of no help to me to be told "You must not really...be doing as you say" rather than having someone accept it as the truth and help me explore other options. It's really counterproductive as it causes overweight individuals to avoid healthcare rather than deal with the comments we all have heard and know are being said about us as well.
    NRSKarenRN and VivaLasViejas like this.
  6. Visit  tothepointeLVN profile page
    1
    Quote from edmia
    I think you need to educate yourself more. Food is absolutely an addiction whether you eats lots of it or the wrong kinds of it. Obesity is not normal. Stop defending it as it only hurts people suffering from unhealthy habits more.
    Oh get real. Stating that many/most obese are addicted to food like a crack addict is to crack is ok but defending that personal experience plus what you see on tv is not absolute fact is "hurtful" and I need "education"

    Food addiction is not in the DSM IV but cocaine addiction is 304.20

    There's many pathways to being obese but to say many people are x and many people are y without reliable data to back it up is incorrect. Observation is the least reliable scientific method.

    It sounds like you have an intolerance to carbs not an addiction. I have a significant background in nutrition because thats what I was studying to be before I switched to being a nurse. The basic fundamental is you need to met people where they are at and not making sweeping assumptions and judgements which is the entire point of this thread.

    And yes I accidently switched my verbs around on the excess/deficit but missed the edit deadline.
    NRSKarenRN likes this.
  7. Visit  tothepointeLVN profile page
    1
    Quote from bagladyrn
    What I am seeing on this thread is something that is very common in my experience with health care providers and exactly the kind of prejudice that affects their healthcare: someone tells you what the eat, their level of activity, their experience with various diets and the immediate reactions is "Yeah, right....". The assumption is always that they are lying, that they couldn't possibly be doing all that and still be overweight.
    Fat discrimination is the one last politically acceptable forms of discrimination left. If you substituted obese out for black, white, blonde or blue there would be an uproar. But use a disease label like obesity and its ok.

    And its not. Regardless of what you see on TV. Regardless of your personal experiences. It's just wrong and to think otherwise is a big FAT lie.
    VivaLasViejas likes this.
  8. Visit  Stephalump profile page
    1
    Actually, it would fall under Eating Disorders, Not Otherwise Specified, or Binge-Eating Disorder.

    As someone with a plethora of experiences involving psychology and eating disorders, I would absolutely be shocked if I came across a morbidly obese person who was not diagnosed with an eating disorder, barring some sort of other obvious medical condition.
    Last edit by Stephalump on Jun 23, '12
    anotherone likes this.
  9. Visit  edmia profile page
    0
    Quote from tothepointeLVN

    Oh get real. Stating that many/most obese are addicted to food like a crack addict is to crack is ok but defending that personal experience plus what you see on tv is not absolute fact is "hurtful" and I need "education"

    Food addiction is not in the DSM IV but cocaine addiction is 304.20

    There's many pathways to being obese but to say many people are x and many people are y without reliable data to back it up is incorrect. Observation is the least reliable scientific method.

    It sounds like you have an intolerance to carbs not an addiction. I have a significant background in nutrition because thats what I was studying to be before I switched to being a nurse. The basic fundamental is you need to met people where they are at and not making sweeping assumptions and judgements which is the entire point of this thread.

    And yes I accidently switched my verbs around on the excess/deficit but missed the edit deadline.
    Sounds to me like your only interest is in being correct instead of being open to different ideas. Kind of goes against the point you're trying to make, doesn't it?

    We're having a discussion, I don't have time to cite my opinions but there is proof out there regarding the general bad nutrition of the human race today when compared to the biological makeup of our gut.

    And nutritionists do not know everything as they are limited by their western medical training model.

    Peace out.
  10. Visit  tothepointeLVN profile page
    0
    It's passing off opinion as fact that I object to. This is WHY there are prejudices against obese people. If you can't see that then no amount of persuasive argument is going to change your mind.

    ED NOS might be correct for some people, morbidly obese people in particular but think the numbers would be fewer than you think. In any case ED NOS ≠ Addiction.
  11. Visit  rubato profile page
    2
    Just because you were in school for nutrition doesn't make you an expert. I am a certified personal trainer and a nutritionist, but I don't claim to be an expert.

    I also don't think anyone but you is making these blanket statements. Being overweight is not the same thing as being a minority. A lot of overweight people are making the decision to overeat. I don't know any minority race that made the decision to be so. And, I don't like the fact that we're mixing up discrimination with concern for health.

    Binge eating is in fact a disorder. And, a lot of my clients were binge eaters. They would work their butts off exercising to try to lose weight only to go home and lose all their hard work with their diets. It made them miserable and I felt horrible for them.
    edmia and anotherone like this.
  12. Visit  Pets to People profile page
    3
    [QUOTE=bagladyrn;6628673]What I am seeing on this thread is something that is very common in my experience with health care providers and exactly the kind of prejudice that affects their healthcare: someone tells you what the eat, their level of activity, their experience with various diets and the immediate reactions is "Yeah, right....". The assumption is always that they are lying, that they couldn't possibly be doing all that and still be overweight.
    QUOTE]

    You know, after I logged off last night I realized that I never mentioned that although I overeat often to the extreme, unlike the other poster that only eats 350 or so extra calories a day, but I work out a lot, so my weight gain has been gradual as well. I have slowly added on 10-20lbs a year since the birth of my first child. So we see that there are so many factors to the equation that can affect the outcome.

    Yes, I get that reaction a lot too. Someone will be like "There's no way you can eat all that!", or "How can you still be hungry?!" and I am like "You have noooo idea!" But I also know how to kill it in the gym. But that hasn't gotten me back into a pair of jeans in several years. I cry when I try to shop for a pair of jeans, so I just wear work out clothes instead. I can always find a pair of work out sweats to fit me lol. But anyway, hopefully that is about to change with this Paleo diet thing. I am planning to make it a lifelong change, and I don't see any issues with it, because it makes so much sense to me and works great with my lifestyle and way of thinking.

    As another poster mentioned about carb cravings...I have had those too, they can make you go mad and leave you shoving half a cake down your throat in no time flat. That's why I do not believe regular diets work, or atleast one of the reasons. You take someone who is addicted to carbs and tell them to just have a little and that's it, look but only taste, one bit is all you need...WHATEVER! Try telling someone hooked on crack to just have a little taste! With the low carbs diet you do not take in any carbs that are not found in fruits or veggies. Once you adjust, you don't have that horribly strong physical craving, sometimes just the mental craving because you remember it as a comfort food. And there is no temptation because it's off the menu. Once your taste buds adapt, fruit becomes super sweet. I can barely eat a whole banana or even an apple because they tastes so super sweet. You should give it a try...do some research on it yourself, pros and cons from all sides...don't just take anyones word for it, collect your info and do your own trial run, but give it all you've got, you can't half ass it cause that will never work no matter what you are trying.

    Another thing I was thinking...It could be possible that physicians do not address the issue because they just don't know how to...we think that as physicians they basically know everything. But when it comes to nutrition I believe they have like what, one nutrition class during their whole education? On top of that, there are so many different aspects of nutrition and weight loss and the information changes every year, sometimes several times a year. That's a lot of info to stay current with, especially when they have so many other aspects of human health to stay on top of. So that is why they should refer to those who do know!
    anotherone, SHGR, and VivaLasViejas like this.
  13. Visit  Pets to People profile page
    0
    [QUOTE=tothepointeLVN;6629151]
    It sounds like you have an intolerance to carbs not an addiction. QUOTE]

    This certainly could be a valid possibility, it makes total sense...as I mentioned in another post, when our cells become desensitized to insulin and cannot absorb the glucose we take in, it is then turned to fat instead and our body tells us to eat more because it has still not recieve the energy it asked for. This could seem like an addiction or craving, when in fact it is just our starving bodies trying to get the only type of fuel we are forcing it to burn, carbs. And no matter how much of it we take in we are never really satisfied. Good point!
  14. Visit  Pets to People profile page
    0
    Quote from Stephalump
    Actually, it would fall under Eating Disorders, Not Otherwise Specified, or Binge-Eating Disorder.

    As someone with a plethora of experiences involving psychology and eating disorders, I would absolutely be shocked if I came across a morbidly obese person who was not diagnosed with an eating disorder, barring some sort of other obvious medical condition.
    But of course they would diagnose it as a type of eating disorder. The medical community is notorious for having to put a label on everything in order to validate and understand it. If someone with a degree hasn't given it a name, it can't possibly be anything important or valid. Perhaps it is not an eating disorder, in many cases (not all of course, but quite certainly the majority) but in fact it is that we are trying to force our bodies to survivie on a diet that it was never ment to utilize in the first place and our bodies are very obviously tell us so, with the huge spikes in obesity, diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, food allergies and so on. We are omnivores by our basic biology, yes, but we are not ruminants, so why do we eat so many grains and make them practically the staple of our diet?

    How can, what 50% (or more?) of the US population have an eating disorder? Just think about that for a moment...everything has changed within the last 30 or so years; obesity is a very new epidemic. So what has changed?


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top