Patients on Medicaid - page 32

by DiEd 33,419 Views | 333 Comments

I hope not to offend anyone out there, but I would appreciate some feedback on taking care of young to middle-aged adults who are on medicaid. It seems that so many (I realize not all) are some of the most difficult patients to... Read More


  1. 0
    [QUOTE=heron;2653429]
    Quote from sharona97
    Heron,

    Sharon --- Please don't patronize me or take my words out of context. My post was a reply to one that bemoaned the loss of inherited wealth. Furthermore, you don't know what I've lived through ... I survived 2 New England winters with a toddler and no heat because I was over-income for fuel assistance. I fed, clothed and sheltered 2 people on one income at a time when nurses made squat. So, yes, it is easy to have an opinion because I have walked the walk on both sides of the tracks.

    I believe that we need to STOP demonizing each other. Some people do abuse the system and it's legitimate to get upset about that. There are also some people who are unfairly stereotyped, do not get the help they deserve and it's equally legitimate to get upset about that, too. If we keep invalidating each other, how are we going to hear the others' truth? Heron
    I hear ya $3.85/hr as a single parent without benefits pretty much allows my memory to serve me well.
  2. 2
    Quote from MAISY, RN-ER
    The actual medicaid card costs the user their pride....that is alot more costly than money.

    Are you aware that doctors DO NOT HAVE TO TAKE MEDICAID?

    Hospital referral doctors DO NO HAVE TO TAKE MEDICAID.

    SPECIALISTS DO NOT TAKE MEDICAID-GOD FORBID YOU HAVE AN ILLNESS REQUIRING ONE.

    Hospitals will treat, then street your emergent condition.

    There can be no follow up on your chronic conditions if you have no medical doctor to work with.

    You are forced to deal with students, residents, and be the learning dummy.

    You wait hours to be seen in clinics, that is if you can get an appointment or have access to the city a clinic may be in.

    Oh you do get your medications paid for.....but then again, you need to get a doctor.

    The difference between private insurance and Medicaid IS A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE!

    Desperate times, make desperate people. Perhaps, if someone is cranky, nasty, or on the defensive....they have learned to be from those of you who obviously feel Medicaid is a free ride. There is no such thing. Just look at your statements....already they are less than the rest of us...not working, lazy, blah blah blah....lots to say about people we don't know...hmm....

    Maisy
    I have decent insurance, again I would honestly trade my card for it though. Medicaid is really nice if you have huge hospital bills. Would a person on Medicaid have to pay 10,000 dollars of a 100,000 bill? How about the people who dont have insurance and dont qualify for Medicaid. Or those that work and have insurance that have a high deductible and limited coverage. Those are the people I feel most sorry for. Again a Medicaid card is better than nothing and these people should be very appreciative for it but I have said it many times, with the amount of taxes we pay--everyone should get free care. It happens quite frequently that people quit their jobs and their insurance so they can qualify for Medicaid. It does have advantages over private insurance.

    Does it cause as much pride loss as the working poor or middle class who cannot afford to pay their doctor bill?

    Are you aware that doctors do not have to take those who cannot afford to pay either?

    The same hospital referral doctors also do not have to take someone who cannot pay and many times I have seen people denied because they did not have up front money to give.

    Hospitals will treat and street anyone. The difference is, if you dont have Medicaid or if you do have insurance you are likely to also have a 100-1000 dollar bill (or more if no insurance) plus you get to spend another 100 on your medication you was prescribed.

    There can also be no follow up if you cannot afford to pay for it.

    I often have to wait an hour when I go to my doctor, if I go to an urgent care sometimes it is at least an hour or several hours to be seen.
    runnergirl25 and Altra like this.
  3. 3
    This post is about Medicaid....so that is the information I am providing, as well as, my own private experience. I live in an area where medical coverage abounds and Medicaid recipients are abused (as far as I am concerned) by the medical community.

    If you'd like to make it about all, then I believe all Americans deserve access to GOOD healthcare. I understand the plight of the working poor, underinsured and non-insured. Have been there. Currently, I work for the largest hospital system in the state, it's NJ 3rd largest employer....our healthcare system is hospital based...our physicians do not want to take it....how about that, doctors not wanting to care of those they work with? Why? It's a crappy system....I am lucky and have a PPO with my husband's international company....GET IT...International company that provides GOOD healthcare.

    The problem with us is us...as long as we put up with the status quo in healthcare. We will get as a group what we deserve. I will always talk up for the disadvantaged. I will speak Spanish (badly) to those who need it and point them in the right direction. I will find the answers to questions put to me by those who don't know the system. And I will continue to educate the ignorant and challenge them to live that day in another's shoes. Until you've drowned, you can't even imagine.

    Why will I do this? Because I was graced with the brain and ability to do so. Because I have a social conscience. Because I believe that is truly our mission while alive, and as healthcare workers. What's the point of inhabiting a spot on this earth, unless you are here to make it better?

    JMHO

    Maisy

    PS For those of you who boo hoo yours, you sound like those who "are going to get mine" See any correlation?
    Last edit by MAISY, RN-ER on Feb 11, '08 : Reason: one more line
    Lexxie, sharona97, and Simplepleasures like this.
  4. 1
    Quote from Noryn
    I have decent insurance, again I would honestly trade my card for it though. Medicaid is really nice if you have huge hospital bills. Would a person on Medicaid have to pay 10,000 dollars of a 100,000 bill? How about the people who dont have insurance and dont qualify for Medicaid. Or those that work and have insurance that have a high deductible and limited coverage. Those are the people I feel most sorry for. Again a Medicaid card is better than nothing and these people should be very appreciative for it but I have said it many times, with the amount of taxes we pay--everyone should get free care. It happens quite frequently that people quit their jobs and their insurance so they can qualify for Medicaid. It does have advantages over private insurance.

    Does it cause as much pride loss as the working poor or middle class who cannot afford to pay their doctor bill?

    Are you aware that doctors do not have to take those who cannot afford to pay either?

    The same hospital referral doctors also do not have to take someone who cannot pay and many times I have seen people denied because they did not have up front money to give.

    Hospitals will treat and street anyone. The difference is, if you dont have Medicaid or if you do have insurance you are likely to also have a 100-1000 dollar bill (or more if no insurance) plus you get to spend another 100 on your medication you was prescribed.

    There can also be no follow up if you cannot afford to pay for it.

    I often have to wait an hour when I go to my doctor, if I go to an urgent care sometimes it is at least an hour or several hours to be seen.
    You are missing the HUGE point here, you have to be DISABLED to get Medicaid, or you need to be an unwed mother. If you think it is easy to get approved for SSI or SSDI you are very wrong. Here are a couple of links to websites that people post to who have been fighting to get SSDI or SSI for two, three and sometimes more years and a blog written by a ex disability examiner(worked for the SSA). These people lose everything (home, savings, health insurance) in this interum, but maybe it is easier to believe that disabled folks can actually go out there and work. Disabled people are DISABLED because they CANNOT work, why is this such a hard concept to embrace?

    I would give up my card right now for a Medicaid card, not being sarcastic but I am being dead serious. The problem is that current system encourages less work, that is a major factor that keeps many disabled people from seeking employment. They lose their medicaid (which despite what some people think) is much better than nothing at all or bare bones insurance with co pays).
    Hopefully no one will ever become disabled. Anyone who has to go through this is in for a really rude awakening.


    http://groups.msn.com/SocialSecurity...on=get_threads

    http://www.disabilityblogger.blogspot.com/
    Last edit by rn/writer on Feb 11, '08 : Reason: Removed personal references.
    sharona97 likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from ingelein
    Disabled people are DISABLED because they CANNOT work, why is this such a hard concept to embrace?
    Actually, this is partially incorrect. Receiving SSDI and working at the same time has to do with what is considered Substantial Gainful Employment. A person can receive SSDI and still work. They just may not be working and bringing in more money than what is considered SGA.

    Here is the link to the Social Security site that will explain it more clearly and more accurately than I can.

    Explaination of SSDI and the Ability to Continue Working

    I have a neighbor in SSDI and works. He is on SSDI because of Anger Management Issues. He apparently does not play well with others.
    He repairs cars, does yard work and repairs roofs for extra money to supplement his SSDI, but he does not earn more than the dollar amount that the Government allows per month because if he does go over that amount, he will lose his monthly SSDI checks and all of his medical care.
  6. 0
    Quote from MAISY, RN-ER
    The actual medicaid card costs the user their pride....that is alot more costly than money.

    Are you aware that doctors DO NOT HAVE TO TAKE MEDICAID?

    Hospital referral doctors DO NO HAVE TO TAKE MEDICAID.

    SPECIALISTS DO NOT TAKE MEDICAID-GOD FORBID YOU HAVE AN ILLNESS REQUIRING ONE.

    Hospitals will treat, then street your emergent condition.

    There can be no follow up on your chronic conditions if you have no medical doctor to work with.

    You are forced to deal with students, residents, and be the learning dummy.

    You wait hours to be seen in clinics, that is if you can get an appointment or have access to the city a clinic may be in.

    Oh you do get your medications paid for.....but then again, you need to get a doctor.

    The difference between private insurance and Medicaid IS A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE!

    Desperate times, make desperate people. Perhaps, if someone is cranky, nasty, or on the defensive....they have learned to be from those of you who obviously feel Medicaid is a free ride. There is no such thing. Just look at your statements....already they are less than the rest of us...not working, lazy, blah blah blah....lots to say about people we don't know...hmm....

    Maisy
    There's a post on the Phillipine Nursing board about how paying and non-paying patients are segregated, and the non-paying patients really do get inferior care.
  7. 0
    Quote from I love my cat!
    I have a neighbor in SSDI and works. He is on SSDI because of Anger Management Issues. He apparently does not play well with others.
    Go to my post #298 for more on this.
  8. 1
    Quote from I love my cat!
    Actually, this is partially incorrect. Receiving SSDI and working at the same time has to do with what is considered Substantial Gainful Employment. A person can receive SSDI and still work. They just may not be working and bringing in more money than what is considered SGA.

    Here is the link to the Social Security site that will explain it more clearly and more accurately than I can.

    Explaination of SSDI and the Ability to Continue Working

    I have a neighbor in SSDI and works. He is on SSDI because of Anger Management Issues. He apparently does not play well with others.
    He repairs cars, does yard work and repairs roofs for extra money to supplement his SSDI, but he does not earn more than the dollar amount that the Government allows per month because if he does go over that amount, he will lose his monthly SSDI checks and all of his medical care.
    You are correct, IF the persons disability is not so severe they can work a very limited amount of hours.There are many disabled that can no longer work AT ALL .I honestly dont know why anyone would accept SSDI or SSI if they could work, maybe they could not earn enough wages on such limited working hours to be able to exist in our economy.
    sharona97 likes this.
  9. 1
    Quote from ingelein
    You are missing the HUGE point here, you have to be DISABLED to get Medicaid, or you need to be an unwed mother. If you think it is easy to get approved for SSI or SSDI you are very wrong. Here are a couple of links to websites that people post to who have been fighting to get SSDI or SSI for two, three and sometimes more years and a blog written by a ex disability examiner(worked for the SSA). These people lose everything (home, savings, health insurance) in this interum, but maybe it is easier to believe that disabled folks can actually go out there and work. Disabled people are DISABLED because they CANNOT work, why is this such a hard concept to embrace?

    Hopefully no one will ever become disabled. Anyone who has to go through this is in for a really rude awakening.


    http://groups.msn.com/SocialSecurity...on=get_threads

    http://www.disabilityblogger.blogspot.com/
    I really dont feel I am missing the point. My point is this. Medicaid is much better than what many people have. It isnt perfect but still pretty dang good and as I have posted it will protect you from a huge bill if you have a catastrophic injury.

    I think for many it is difficult to get approved for SSI but for a few who know how to work the system, it seems to be a bit easier.

    As far as your line about disabled people, I just dont understand it. Disabled people work everyday, the ADA has been instrumental in creating a workplace they can thrive in. There are still barriers but physical disabilities are being overcome. Mental/Cognitive barriers admittedly are much harder. But my last nursing job housed an occupational rehabilitation center.

    I have seen a quad take a supervisory position in a hospital. The best social worker I have ever seen went through their program. So humans are capable of unimaginable things.

    But my point was this--and it ties into Medicaid. Often these people who are disabled have chronic conditions that are relatively expensive. Once they lose their Medicaid they can actually lose money by working. Private insurances has the co pays or deductibles that make it really difficult for them.

    Perhaps our biggest problem is that Medicaid is different based on state. In my state, WV, I can honestly tell you it is pretty good insurance with almost no out of pocket expenses.
    I love my cat! likes this.
  10. 0
    Quote from ingelein
    You are correct, IF the persons disability is not so severe they can work a very limited amount of hours.There are many disabled that can no longer work AT ALL .I honestly dont know why anyone would accept SSDI or SSI if they could work, maybe they could not earn enough wages on such limited working hours to be able to exist in our economy.
    That is correct. There are many that can still work (and do), but not enough to support themselves. Although, ever see the average amount a month that a person on Disability receives? Something like $625 a month. Who in the heck can live on that???


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