Patient Care And Customer Service Are Not The Same! - page 3

by TheCommuter Asst. Admin

12,462 Visits | 34 Comments

Patient care and customer service might seem interchangeable to healthcare administrators and members of the public, but they are most certainly not the same. If nurses ignore the differences between the two practices, the... Read More


  1. 0
    Cold Stethoscope, I disagree with you 100%. There is no insurance company in the U.S. that would ever pay for travel to Thailand or anywhere else unless it was for something that was not offered here and in that case it most likely would not be covered. Joint replacement in U.S. is not "elective" as it may be in other countries. These are my least favorite surgeries as the work is physically hard and the equipment is many. Our hospital does quite a bit and none are elective. But on the other hand I am sure a lot of people would love to go to Thailand for example if given the choice and paid for.
  2. 2
    Quote from needshaldol
    Cold Stethoscope, I disagree with you 100%. There is no insurance company in the U.S. that would ever pay for travel to Thailand or anywhere else unless it was for something that was not offered here and in that case it most likely would not be covered. Joint replacement in U.S. is not "elective" as it may be in other countries. These are my least favorite surgeries as the work is physically hard and the equipment is many. Our hospital does quite a bit and none are elective. But on the other hand I am sure a lot of people would love to go to Thailand for example if given the choice and paid for.
    I think you may be confusing elective with cosmetic. No one is going to die from a bad knee. that makes that surgery elective. And i do believe that this tourist medecine has been going on for a while. If it is fiscally sound for the insurer, why would they balk?
    Jessy_RN and Cold Stethoscope like this.
  3. 0
    Steth you must not be U.S.? Because knee surgery is not considered "elective" here. Our health insurance here is so mixed up but there is no way the insurance would pay for leaving the country. Has nothing to do with it being "fiscally sound". I could just see it......great vacations paid for by our govt? Never ever will happen. I can't imagine it being paid for by another other country? I guess I take it for granted that certain hip, knee, etc is covered for here. I have heard stories of people waiting a year for it in other countries and at least our wait could be two weeks or maybe less.
  4. 3
    Quote from needshaldol
    Our health insurance here is so mixed up but there is no way the insurance would pay for leaving the country. Has nothing to do with it being "fiscally sound". I could just see it......great vacations paid for by our govt? Never ever will happen.
    While the US government might not be financing medical tourism, many US-based health insurance companies have jumped onto the bandwagon and have been paying for surgical and dental procedures abroad for the past several years due to the 80 percent cost savings. They'll even cover airfare and certain hotels.

    Medical tourism is alive and well, and numerous insurance companies will pay.

    Insurers aim to save from overseas medical tourism - USATODAY.com

    Hip surgery in India? Insurance may pay - Health - Health care - NBCNews.com
  5. 0
    Well I apologize then. I would never ever think the U.S. insurance would cover such things. I am going to check into it for sure. I could use a nice vacation! But I truly have never heard or have known anyone who has had this luxury. I would like to know what insurance pays for this? I understand elective surgery like cosmetic but I still have a hard time believing that Delta Dental which is HUGE is going to pay for someone to go to Mexico for dental work. Just saying.
  6. 0
    Quote from needshaldol
    Steth you must not be U.S.? Because knee surgery is not considered "elective" here.
    Yes, I live in the U.S., and always have. I had a bad skiing accident, which left me with "severe ACL insufficiency" in my right knee. I found one on the best orthopedic surgeons in Boston and consulted him twice about whether I needed surgery. It came down to whether I wanted to play knee-twisting sports like tennis, basketball, or aggressive skiing, or whether I could live without them. I chose to forgo the surgery. If I didn't have insurance, and I did want the surgery, you can be sure that I would have done some research and likely booked a trip to India.

    It's not cosmetic surgery. Since I did have insurance, they would have paid to have it done in Boston.

    As our OP said, since you can have the same work done overseas for far less money, some insurance companies are willing to foot the bill for the trip. As I said, I once had insurance where you would be sent to different states for major procedures, such as organ transplants.

    I doubt that the government would send people they insure (e.g., those who have Medicaid) overseas because it would be bad publicity for American healthcare and technology.

    (By the way, there was an interesting story on medical tourism on 60 Minutes a few years ago.)
    Last edit by Cold Stethoscope on Aug 23, '12
  7. 4
    Ugh. The patient and visitors do not get to decide what are stable vitals or not. The Dr. does and I have seen many of these "stable vitals" crump fast. After all pt is in a hospital for a reason. Thier right to refuse but I will let them know why it is important to assess. Also I work nights and like to check IV sites frequently. The first to cry about the door opening will be the first to cry with an inflitration.
    Jessy_RN, jrbl77, BrandonLPN, and 1 other like this.
  8. 9
    Here is more gems. I made a post on this when it happened. I once provided terrible service by not bringing chairs for VISITORS quickly enough. One of them was standing in the hall way saying, " WE ASKED FOR CHAIRS, WHERE ARE THEY?" only a few minutes went by. MEANWHILE when I left the room initially to get the chairs, I HEARD FROM THE HALLWAY, THAT one of my other patient's needed a trach suctioned STAT. that is the priority NOT THE CHAIRS FOR visitors. Yet some uneducated visitor is at liberty to whine about "poor nursing" when she and her entorouge do not get their chairs within 5 minutes. Those are the service scenarios that nurses can't stand. Or pts who complain about getting awoken for IV abx. I can go on and on. Sometimes I think I should pack my stuff, go back to a big city and work in a bar, restaurant, etc where I can put my service skills to good use and get paid tips. lol
    Jessy_RN, jrbl77, oinch97, and 6 others like this.
  9. 3
    Quote from neverbethesame
    It's going to get much, much worse!!! Read this article and weep!!

    Patients? Grades to Affect Hospitals? Medicare Reimbursements - NYTimes.com



    Oh sweet, merciful God...I am honestly scared for the future of 'healthcare' now. Especially considering the high sense of entitlement from certain Medicaid and Medicare recipients who are not satisfied no matter what we do for them. The world is going to heck in a hand-basket right quick!
    Jessy_RN, jrbl77, and Szasz_is_Right like this.
  10. 3
    Quote from Crazed
    Well at least my extensive sales and customer service background will be advantageous to me when I finish my program.

    The ACA is filled with all kinds of wonderful things and I highly reccomend everyone does some research.
    Sure, just like getting reimbursement depending on customer satisfaction? 'Oh, your 3 week stay where everyone did everything they could for you was only an 8/10?' Well then, no money for you hospital! SMH...what is the world coming to where we think this is ok in ANY way, shape or form?!
    This sense of entitlement that is growing is just completely nuts! Soon enough we will be lighting their cigarettes for them, forget about the permanent O2 NC attached to their face. Doing fast food runs for our morbidly obese patients, just to avoid those low satisfaction scores...

    Jessy_RN, jrbl77, and Szasz_is_Right like this.


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