Patient Care And Customer Service Are Not The Same! - page 2

Patient care and customer service might seem interchangeable to healthcare administrators and members of the public, but they are most certainly not the same. If nurses ignore the differences between... Read More

  1. Visit  IdislikeCODEbrowns profile page
    12
    My hospital is 'sooo' into this customer service BS, they have given us scripts to follow when doing 'bedside report' we are supposed to have things ready for pts when they come up to our floor from wherever (ER, OBs, etc) like fresh ice water, the towels folded like a fan on the bed, their name on the white board, hot coffee already made, etc. We have cell phones that we give our #'s to the pts and they can call us directly instead of hitting the call light when they want something. We are even in the process of having the pts pick out a colored stone w/ inspirational phrases on it upon their admission so that can be their 'guiding spirit/inspiration' throughout their hospital stay. It has gotten to the point that many of us are more worried about 'pleasing pts' than actually providing medical care. I cannot physically be the pts personal butler while carrying out all their healthcare needs plus babysitting doctors and monitoring techs who do vitals and whatnot. I am only one person and I went to nursing school and sat for boards for a reason, to do nursing tasks to help the patient get healthy, not ensure that their pitcher is full of fresh ice water before change of shift or that the meals come out just the way they want them from food service. I don't need a script to follow to introduce myself to pts, I have common sense and people skills, I do these things anyways, but should I get dinged for forgetting to ask the pt. if they wanted their door open or closed when I leave their room...??? How far will this go?
    Jessy_RN, mc3, JZ_RN, and 9 others like this.
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  3. Visit  jrbl77 profile page
    4
    My hospital is 'sooo' into this customer service BS, they have given us scripts to follow when doing 'bedside report' we are supposed to have things ready for pts when they come up to our floor from wherever (ER, OBs, etc) like fresh ice water, the towels folded like a fan on the bed, their name on the white board, hot coffee already made, etc. We have cell phones that we give our #'s to the pts and they can call us directly instead of hitting the call light when they want something. We are even in the process of having the pts pick out a colored stone w/ inspirational phrases on it upon their admission so that can be their 'guiding spirit/inspiration' throughout their hospital stay. It has gotten to the point that many of us are more worried about 'pleasing pts' than actually providing medical care. I cannot physically be the pts personal butler while carrying out all their healthcare needs plus babysitting doctors and monitoring techs who do vitals and whatnot. I am only one person and I went to nursing school and sat for boards for a reason, to do nursing tasks to help the patient get healthy, not ensure that their pitcher is full of fresh ice water before change of shift or that the meals come out just the way they want them from food service. I don't need a script to follow to introduce myself to pts, I have common sense and people skills, I do these things anyways, but should I get dinged for forgetting to ask the pt. if they wanted their door open or closed when I leave their room...??? How far will this go?
    I couldn't agree more with the above comment. Somedays when I am being told what to say and how to act, I feel like a 2 yr old. I have been a Nurse long enough to know how to care for a sick person. I am not your Mother or your maid or your butler. I will be glad to care for you and give you the very best care that I can! I am your NURSE.
    MiniBabyRN, JZ_RN, Szasz_is_Right, and 1 other like this.
  4. Visit  Crazed profile page
    2
    Well at least my extensive sales and customer service background will be advantageous to me when I finish my program.

    The ACA is filled with all kinds of wonderful things and I highly reccomend everyone does some research.
    anotherone and SlinkyheadRN like this.
  5. Visit  JZ_RN profile page
    0
    I'm a nurse, not a servant. I provide care, not "service." I wish people could get it through their heads!
  6. Visit  maelstrom143 profile page
    1
    Excellent article, superb points. Thank you so much for putting forth such a wonderful article
    TheCommuter likes this.
  7. Visit  aggiexpooh profile page
    3
    I feel that as nursing students we are taught this everytime at clinical! That literally we are going to b bad future nurses because we did not pack up a patient's bag before they discharge or changed thier tv channels for them when they got bored...it makes me feel like we are being treated more like butlers than nurses
    JZ_RN, Szasz_is_Right, and anotherone like this.
  8. Visit  hiddencatRN profile page
    3
    I hate the customer service mentality. Hate it. I think it really diminishes what we do to frame it in terms of "customer satisfaction" rather than "excellent patient care." There are many situations where doing the right thing by your patients means making some of them unhappy. You see this in emergency nursing a ton in terms of wait times, and it really becomes a challenge: folks who can wait the longest are the healthiest and in the best position to complain about how miserable that wait was!

    Why not have hospitality techs who can pass out magazines, fetch STAT blankets and ice chips for all 9 visitors in the room, and figure out why the TV isn't working.
    VanLpn, MiniBabyRN, and anotherone like this.
  9. Visit  needshaldol profile page
    0
    Cold Stethoscope, I disagree with you 100%. There is no insurance company in the U.S. that would ever pay for travel to Thailand or anywhere else unless it was for something that was not offered here and in that case it most likely would not be covered. Joint replacement in U.S. is not "elective" as it may be in other countries. These are my least favorite surgeries as the work is physically hard and the equipment is many. Our hospital does quite a bit and none are elective. But on the other hand I am sure a lot of people would love to go to Thailand for example if given the choice and paid for.
  10. Visit  morte profile page
    2
    Quote from needshaldol
    Cold Stethoscope, I disagree with you 100%. There is no insurance company in the U.S. that would ever pay for travel to Thailand or anywhere else unless it was for something that was not offered here and in that case it most likely would not be covered. Joint replacement in U.S. is not "elective" as it may be in other countries. These are my least favorite surgeries as the work is physically hard and the equipment is many. Our hospital does quite a bit and none are elective. But on the other hand I am sure a lot of people would love to go to Thailand for example if given the choice and paid for.
    I think you may be confusing elective with cosmetic. No one is going to die from a bad knee. that makes that surgery elective. And i do believe that this tourist medecine has been going on for a while. If it is fiscally sound for the insurer, why would they balk?
    Jessy_RN and Cold Stethoscope like this.
  11. Visit  needshaldol profile page
    0
    Steth you must not be U.S.? Because knee surgery is not considered "elective" here. Our health insurance here is so mixed up but there is no way the insurance would pay for leaving the country. Has nothing to do with it being "fiscally sound". I could just see it......great vacations paid for by our govt? Never ever will happen. I can't imagine it being paid for by another other country? I guess I take it for granted that certain hip, knee, etc is covered for here. I have heard stories of people waiting a year for it in other countries and at least our wait could be two weeks or maybe less.
  12. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    3
    Quote from needshaldol
    Our health insurance here is so mixed up but there is no way the insurance would pay for leaving the country. Has nothing to do with it being "fiscally sound". I could just see it......great vacations paid for by our govt? Never ever will happen.
    While the US government might not be financing medical tourism, many US-based health insurance companies have jumped onto the bandwagon and have been paying for surgical and dental procedures abroad for the past several years due to the 80 percent cost savings. They'll even cover airfare and certain hotels.

    Medical tourism is alive and well, and numerous insurance companies will pay.

    Insurers aim to save from overseas medical tourism - USATODAY.com

    Hip surgery in India? Insurance may pay - Health - Health care - NBCNews.com
  13. Visit  needshaldol profile page
    0
    Well I apologize then. I would never ever think the U.S. insurance would cover such things. I am going to check into it for sure. I could use a nice vacation! But I truly have never heard or have known anyone who has had this luxury. I would like to know what insurance pays for this? I understand elective surgery like cosmetic but I still have a hard time believing that Delta Dental which is HUGE is going to pay for someone to go to Mexico for dental work. Just saying.
  14. Visit  Cold Stethoscope profile page
    0
    Quote from needshaldol
    Steth you must not be U.S.? Because knee surgery is not considered "elective" here.
    Yes, I live in the U.S., and always have. I had a bad skiing accident, which left me with "severe ACL insufficiency" in my right knee. I found one on the best orthopedic surgeons in Boston and consulted him twice about whether I needed surgery. It came down to whether I wanted to play knee-twisting sports like tennis, basketball, or aggressive skiing, or whether I could live without them. I chose to forgo the surgery. If I didn't have insurance, and I did want the surgery, you can be sure that I would have done some research and likely booked a trip to India.

    It's not cosmetic surgery. Since I did have insurance, they would have paid to have it done in Boston.

    As our OP said, since you can have the same work done overseas for far less money, some insurance companies are willing to foot the bill for the trip. As I said, I once had insurance where you would be sent to different states for major procedures, such as organ transplants.

    I doubt that the government would send people they insure (e.g., those who have Medicaid) overseas because it would be bad publicity for American healthcare and technology.

    (By the way, there was an interesting story on medical tourism on 60 Minutes a few years ago.)
    Last edit by Cold Stethoscope on Aug 23, '12


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