Nursing student lied about me to my manager, and I cannot prove it. - page 4

by Tortoiseshell | 6,535 Views | 48 Comments

I will try to make this short. I am an RN and have been working in a hospital med-surg unit for 4 years. Recently one of our nurses was precepting an RN student who is about to graduate. I was getting report from the... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from shye

    It still doesn't give the student the right to lie just because she got her ego bruised...
    ^This sets up a possible pattern for questionable behavior when licensed.
    anotherone likes this.
  2. 1
    I think there is more to the story. I just cannot see a NM automatically believing a student without doing an investigation first. I don't put anything pass anyone but I don't know, just seems like something isn't adding up.
    I stick to my previous post, the OP should take accountablilty. What she said wasn't rude in my opinion however, we don't know how the tone was, or what her body language said. For example: I can say " you look nice today" with a smile and open posture or I can say "you look nice today" with my arms crossed, eyes rolled, and frowning.
    I don't understand how people still don't know that it is not what you say but HOW you say it. I've had people give me constructive critism without being nasty about it.
    If the student did lie, then shame on her and she should be reprimanded.
    ShyeoftheTiger likes this.
  3. 0
    Quote from crazy&cuteRN
    I think there is more to the story. I just cannot see a NM automatically believing a student without doing an investigation first. I don't put anything pass anyone but I don't know, just seems like something isn't adding up.
    I stick to my previous post, the OP should take accountablilty. What she said wasn't rude in my opinion however, we don't know how the tone was, or what her body language said. For example: I can say " you look nice today" with a smile and open posture or I can say "you look nice today" with my arms crossed, eyes rolled, and frowning.
    I don't understand how people still don't know that it is not what you say but HOW you say it. I've had people give me constructive critism without being nasty about it.
    If the student did lie, then shame on her and she should be reprimanded.
    I agree something is fishy here.
  4. 0
    Quote from crazy&cuteRN
    I think there is more to the story. I just cannot see a NM automatically believing a student without doing an investigation first. I don't put anything pass anyone but I don't know, just seems like something isn't adding up.
    I stick to my previous post, the OP should take accountablilty. What she said wasn't rude in my opinion however, we don't know how the tone was, or what her body language said. For example: I can say " you look nice today" with a smile and open posture or I can say "you look nice today" with my arms crossed, eyes rolled, and frowning.
    I don't understand how people still don't know that it is not what you say but HOW you say it. I've had people give me constructive critism without being nasty about it.
    If the student did lie, then shame on her and she should be reprimanded.
    ^Agree with this.

    We weren't there...we don't know how the interaction happened.

    However, I find that people's tone while face to face can be misconstrued as well.

    The best thing the OP can do is if anything arises like this again, is to go to the clinical instructor, and let her handle it, and so should the student.
  5. 1
    I still think it's far more likely that her NM sold her down the river for an office politic reason of some sort or what went on between student, the preceptor, and the manager without the OP being present for that than that she would come to an internet forum and make up a long, detailed account when she had no real reason to seek our approval.

    None of us were there, but nurses get snapped at often for a variety of reasons and it's usually not personal. Stress affects our bodies and our tone of voice. The text of what she said wasn't so earth-shattering horrible, or she wouldn't have felt the need to embellish the story with lies.
    anotherone likes this.
  6. 4
    As I read this thread, and others, I am genuinely perplexed at how bent out of shape some get by the *tone* of another nurse. How in the world do some get through a day of patients, visitors, physicians, and other coworkers without just withering to a pile of dust? Seriously?!
  7. 2
    Quote from RNdynamic
    Your statement was rude and condescending. How would you like it one of your coworkers said that to you?
    I don't see the OP's words as rude and condescending. I would, and have, said "thank you" when I was an orientee and certainly as a student. Hell, I even say it now if something I don't know is pointed out to me. Now, it's usually paperwork-related, but still...
    anotherone and nursel56 like this.
  8. 2
    If she get's this upset because you said that to her I wonder how she'll react when a patient or family member looks at her the wrong way or says something that hurts her little feelings. Will she go crying to the CN and say she refuses to treat them?
    anotherone and redhead_NURSE98! like this.
  9. 0
    Sorry to hear about this incident OP. Of course we don't have all the facts but based on your story I don't see where you did anything wrong. As with any situation especially messy situations like this it's best to live, learn and move on. In the future should you encounter a similar situation it would be better if you not only talk to the student but immediately inform your charge nurse/nursing manager of the situation. By doing this you give the student little time to exaggerate the encounter & you give your side of the story first. It may sound silly and tattle-taling to some but when you're dealing with scheming individuals it's best to CYA. And good luck finding a new job
  10. 2
    Add this to the pile of examples of why no one on my floor wants to have a student. Having a student takes time. Time to explain, time to check after everything hey do, and then inevitably there can be trouble. Sometimes a small part of our day ends up being a class wide clinical discussion and what actually happened can be misrepresented. I had a student one shift and the previous nurse before me had neglected to give meds all day. She left several uncharted and appearing as late. Blood thinners, Bp meds, and other important meds. This nurse does that all the time. Not a new thing. Gets written up daily or it and manager does nothing. I called her at home to ask her what meds she had actually given if any. None had been. I explained to the student that you can't guess, you don't want to double someone up on Bp meds or blood thinners etc. Atient was confused, can't tell you what they had or didnot have. Student went back to clinical group and told them I didn't know what meds to give and called a nurse at home for advice. WTH?! I ad to go to the clinical group and explain what actually happened, student had changed the whole story and made me look like an idiot. She admitted the truth when confronted. No more students for me. Ain't nobody got time for that!
    monkeybug and anotherone like this.


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