Nurses who let NAs Boss them around - page 6

When will nurses ever learn to delegate? When will nurses ever collectively stand up and get some backbone--Fight for higher wages, and better benefits like a company matching 401K plan? I get sick... Read More

  1. by   Gator,SN
    I still would like to know; just .......what are you nurses doing to people, for they have to respond with assault? Or, the the NA's you work with... just plain 'ole ignorant?
    I would say just plain old ignorant....and incredibly stupid!

    Gator
  2. by   gingerzoe
    I think RN's should appreciate all nurses aides for the work that they do. I think it is the RN's job to make the nurses aides feel like they are a very important part of the team. It is a team process in health care. No one can do it all. I have always felt that the nurses aides are my eyes and ears, as I cannot always be with the residents. I think aides are more helpful if they are appreciated and not looked down upon. Why not use this as a learning experience. Alot of nurses aides are nurses in training and you as RN's could be helpful in this process. Yes, I have worked with bad aides but the majority of them were excellent. I have worked in health care for over 20 years.
  3. by   Liddle Noodnik
    Originally posted by MaryG
    They don't get to spend the same amount of time and I wonder sometimes if they feel a great sense of satisfaction............
    You CAN be different!

    Altho'...

    I get peeved when the nurses and aides seem to get a lot of computer time at work and I am always working other than my two 5 minute breaks. Something wrong with that pictue!

    But I am more satisfied I think because I know my patients are cared for. AND I make sure I get my own work done -- I used to be sitting down to start charting after 7 am while my happy cna's were punching out.
  4. by   AutumnSunfire
    I am a Nursing Assistant and we (NA's & RN's) all work together to make the lives of our residents better. Some of what I've read here is very disturbing to me...When I start my shift, the RN will let me know if there is something other then usual that needs done and we do our job. Also, the RN is there for us if we ever need her to help. We have a good working relationship and everyone tries to help each other...isn't that how it should be!? Also, where I work we (Na's) give meds...all except narcotics and injectibles....There's one NA for 10 residents, and they run their butts off daily....there's no room for slacking at our facility...so, to the NA's who do this....SHAME ON YOU....GET YOUR ACT TOGETHER...AND REMEMBER WHO & WHAT YOUR THERE FOR....>The residents/ patients! I love my job and one day will be an RN....Lastly, we have a committment to our co-workers to maintain healthy working relationships so that we can provide excellent service to the residents...we approach the person whom we have a problem with and try to reach a solution as adults....come on....we're all in this for the same reason...resident care..let's do our darndest to achieve it to the best of our abilities....GO AND HAVE AN AWESOME DAY!!!
  5. by   redhd5
    I have worked in LTC for 20 years now and have worn the hats of NA, CNA, Admissions, Supply Clerk, Medical Records Clerk, LPN, Wound Care Nurse, and Administrative Nurse. I feel one of the fundamental problems is lack of education. When I started as an NA and got certified, it required so much more than it does now. I recently asked several new CNA students who were towards the end of their training for the normal parameters for blood pressure, and no one seemed to know. Some of them didn't even know how to take blood pressures! Unfortunately, the staff nurse doesn't have the time to help CNA's hone their job skills, as this should have been done prior to getting certified. Times have certainly changed. I am finding that if I include and empower my CNA's in decisons--I get much better performance from them. They are not given the tools to do their jobs well. CNA's don't know about care plans because they don't cover that in class. They have to be taught and shown, just like anyone else. With a reasonable explaination as to why, most will do what is asked. Alot of the "attitude" has to do with not being informed as to why they are an important part of the care. With HIPPA, things are just going to get worse, I am afraid. But I make sure my aids get report, so they are informed. In a lot of long term care settings, the CNA's aren't even getting report anymore. Can you imagine working somewhere and not getting report and being expected to do everything right?
    And there is such animosity in the nursing heirarchy. The administratvie nurses act like they could never pass meds, the staff nurses can't figure out how to take charge (because most of them don't know how), and the CNA's need direction because they lack basic skills. I have complained to the CNA instructor who brings her students into my nursing home about this, and she agrees that skills aren't what they should be. Well, I ask, "Who is responsible for this?" I work on an acute care unit in LTC at present and I try to fit in "teaching moments" as much as I can, instead of having a constant critical eye. My CNA's do everything I ask of them. I used to be one of them at my own facility, and I have never been given an attitude about being "too good for the job." I am an LPN and we hired an RN who was afraid to suction someone. This is a basic nursing skill for nurses. Instead of shaming her, or belittling her, I simply said, "Come on, let's go learn this together." She was thrilled that someone would help her.
    Being on all sides of the fence has helped to put things into perspective, but the longer I work in nursing, the more understanding I have certainly become and I do commend those that become BSN's and run the facilities. There is a lot of crap out there with funding cuts and trying to make sure the right hoops have been jumped through, for funding. I wouldn't want that job.
    But I certainly am supportive of their efforts to run the nursing home on a shoe string budget.
  6. by   kylee
    I work in a ltc/rehab setting and also find that the majority of cnas are slackers, my work has a program that actually pays the cnas to attend classes and provides free daycare. Numerous cnas both regular and agency are no call no shows and never get reprimanded. (nurses too) I have a patient load of 12 and find myself usually without a cna to help. It took being pregnant to realize that the cnas are always MIA. I guess prior to that I just picked up their slack. I just did it because the patient was the one going without. I also worked as a cna for 4 years and know the workload involved, fortunately I have a few cnas who work as a team with me and on those days we all have fun.
    Last edit by kylee on Jun 5, '03
  7. by   kylee
    I work in a ltc/rehab setting and also find that the majority of cnas are slackers, my work has a program that actually pays the cnas to attend classes and provides free daycare. Numerous cnas both regular and agency are no call no shows and never get reprimanded. (nurses too) I have a patient load of 12 and find myself usually without a cna to help. It took being pregnant to realize that the cnas are always MIA. I guess prior to that I just picked up their slack. I just did it because the patient was the one going without.
  8. by   AutumnSunfire
    RedHd5....when I did my NA course, we were expected to know how to do vitals...including bp's and we had to learn about care plans and a whole lot of other stuff..it was very interesting...We are now we're responsible to read care plans and keep up to date on them....I know with the teacher I had who is an RN, she was exceptional, she taught us everything....we benefitted big time from having her teach us! The sad part is not everyone has such an awesome teacher, and they don't even know how to get a urine spec or even give a supp.....it's the sad truth! So, it's not the education these days...the teachers play an importnat role in the education the students get....mine was awesome!!! The role of an NA is greater then it used to be...for example giving meds....is a big step for us....
  9. by   Brita01
    Originally posted by AutumnSunfire
    RedHd5....when I did my NA course, we were expected to know how to do vitals...including bp's and we had to learn about care plans and a whole lot of other stuff..it was very interesting...We are now we're responsible to read care plans and keep up to date on them....I know with the teacher I had who is an RN, she was exceptional, she taught us everything....we benefitted big time from having her teach us! The sad part is not everyone has such an awesome teacher, and they don't even know how to get a urine spec or even give a supp.....it's the sad truth! So, it's not the education these days...the teachers play an importnat role in the education the students get....mine was awesome!!! The role of an NA is greater then it used to be...for example giving meds....is a big step for us....

    NAs in Canada give meds?? How long is the course?
  10. by   tingle
    I don't feel that you are taking into account the difficulty of the CNA position and the number of nurses that this person has to answer to. Does your institution have a Cna/nurse ratio??? How many nurses/patients do your CNAs have to answer to and/attend on an average basis. Is'nt our combined goal excellent patient care? Have you thought about helping your aides and not forget that poop/pee and humans need for water are also nurses concerns? I guess I feel that we should treat them witrh respect and (if you have never been there) try to understand that they have a very hard job and are not there to answer every nurses beckon call. What do your CNAs get PAID???What do your MacDonalds window people get paid? Is there a big difference in your area????
  11. by   NRSKarenRN
    Was speaking to HR about stating salary for Experienced CNA's for our homecare agency.
    $8.60 hr to start, raise in 6 months + $250.00 attendance, performance bonus every 3 months. Out of 100 aides, only ~3 aides qualify for the bonus quarterly.
  12. by   MaryG
    WOW Karen, I wish our facility was that kind. We(CNA's) started getting and extra $1.00 an hour for extra shifts when the nurses here negotiated their new contract. Kind of funny how that worked, huh? We have no extra kudos for anything like attendance.....we do have a program called the CEP....it's for aides that have a less than 2% absenteeism, attend alot of education, and participate in CQI teams(at least 2). It's a yearly program that we have to submit applications for every 6 months.....don't understand that and if you're out of work because of a work related injury or sickness....you're out of luck. I guess it's better than nothing.
  13. by   ktwlpn
    Originally posted by tingle
    I don't feel that you are taking into account the difficulty of the CNA position and the number of nurses that this person has to answer to. Does your institution have a Cna/nurse ratio??? How many nurses/patients do your CNAs have to answer to and/attend on an average basis. Is'nt our combined goal excellent patient care? Have you thought about helping your aides and not forget that poop/pee and humans need for water are also nurses concerns? I guess I feel that we should treat them witrh respect and (if you have never been there) try to understand that they have a very hard job and are not there to answer every nurses beckon call. What do your CNAs get PAID???What do your MacDonalds window people get paid? Is there a big difference in your area????
    Certified CNA's start at $11.20 an hour at my facility-I don't think that McD's comes close to that in this area(southeastern Pa) On my 44 bed unit I usually have 6 cna's-occassionally 7 and very occassionally 5(not good-we pitch in as much as possible on those days)I am on a locked dementia unit and the resident's abilities vary greatly-I have a few totally dependent and non-amb that will be moved off of our unit when we need the bed for an ambulatory resident.Most of our residents are ambulatory and need verbal cuing for adl's.While the cna's are doing the adls one nurse is pouring meds for all 44-many need MUCH encouragement to take those pills-you can't hold their nose and shove them in....The other nurse does the treatments,body checks on the residents after bathing(usually 6 or 8 a day) routine charting and takes care of doctor's rounds and any incidentals....Problems with visitors,with other departments etc all must be handled.I well know how hard the job is because I did it for many years ...Bottom line- the nurses are responsible for making sure that all aspects of the resident's care is being provided properly-and when the family comes in and wants to know why mom has not been to the beauty shop it's the nurse that has to make the arrangements-or why doesn't mom have her shoes,teeth,eyeglasses or red sweater on? (Because the cna did not put it on) But mom is happy with a good appetite and her CHF and hypothyroidism are stable because the nurse spends 10 mins encouraging her to take her meds...but that is usually not remarked upon-but let the cna forget those teeth..Both jobs are challenging and rewarding-but I can do the job of a cna and they cannot do mine....It's best for the whole unit when the team works cohesively-it improves resident care and morale..."one upping" each other is non-productive-Until you have done both jobs you can not knowledgibly compare the 2.....

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