Nurses Eating Nursing Students - page 12

It was our first day stepping foot on the floor. We were lost. We were scared. We've all been there. If you haven't yet, you will. Some of us were sweating. Some of us were shaking. Some of us... Read More

  1. by   RescueNinjaKy
    Nursing students need to realize this point. Even if you act all eager to learn and help, you aren't always helping. Having a nursing student "helping" me actually translates into the task being done slower than I would have done it, not to mention the time I would've have spent educating and explaining various other things. Don't get me wrong, I like to teach and I have no issue if I get a nursing student if my assignment is appropriate and only if it is one nursing student. So please, do not take it as a blow to your ego, that you were eager to help yet you were still rejected. Heck, I've precepted new employees before and they slowed me down too.

    Now in your situation, the nurse had been up front with you. She already had a senior nursing student. This also means that the nursing student will have a wider scope of tasks and duties as it is their final year. Translation: the nurse is relinquishing even more control to teach this student which could mean that she's gonna be more behind. As far as not allowing you to shadow you, I honestly would not be comfortable having a student just shadow me. If they're going to be following me, I'm gonna have to explain because they would've wasted a precious clinical day otherwise. I don't care what the student wants or says, they simply deserve better, and as such if I can't provide it due to my already hectic work load with another student, I rather refuse and have them assigned to another nurse.

    As far as to whether the nurse was making rude remarks or saying things that aren't true, I have no way of knowing. But I do want to say that I have seen cases in which I would never believe a person would do such a thing and then the next thing you know I see them doing it to a stranger. Some people are just really good at hiding it, and some might only be that way with certain people.
  2. by   Phoenix1963
    I completely understand what the OP is saying and I agree- that nurse should not have been teaching student nurses. I have taught and oriented and mentored from my first hospital job. Yes- the brand new nurse had nursing students because the experienced nurses rebuffed them and wouldn't accept them. It was ********. And all of these critical comments sound just like what I experienced from my coworkers- excuses. That nurse had 3 patients. 3. THREE. She was not too busy. She was too lazy, disinterested, whatever. Nurses DO eat their young. Accept that and move on. Yes, this article was about HER NEEDS- she was the STUDENT. Writing about HER PERCEPTIONS AND EXPERIENCES. That kind of is expected if she is writing about what she personally experienced. How was she able to know what the preceding nurse thought? All she experienced was her actions. As such I don't see how all of these experienced psychic nurses know her account is unreliable. As a preceptor I have never been forced to take a student. I was asked. I knew I would have students. This was not a surprise. She just did not want to be bothered.
    Last edit by Phoenix1963 on Jan 12 : Reason: Cat on keyboard syndrome
  3. by   NurseLauraM
    Quote from Phoenix1963
    I completely understand what the OP is saying and I agree- that nurse should not have been teaching student nurses. I have taught and oriented and mentored from my first hospital job. Yes- the brand new nurse had nursing students because the experienced nurses rebuffed them and wouldn't accept them. It was ********. And all of these critical comments sound just like what I experienced from my coworkers- excuses. That nurse had 3 patients. 3. THREE. She was not too busy. She was too lazy, disinterested, whatever. Nurses DO eat their young. Accept that and move on. Yes, this article was about HER NEEDS- she was the STUDENT. Writing about HER PERCEPTIONS AND EXPERIENCES. That kind of As a preceptor I have never been forced to take a student. I was asked. I knew I would have students. This was not a surprise. She just did not want to be bothered.
    You just joined and this is your first post? OP in disguise?
  4. by   Phoenix1963
    Quote from NurseLauraM
    You just joined and this is your first post? OP in disguise?
    I knew I'd get this. And yet you all say the OP is wrong about nurses eating their young.

    Not the OP. I'm in Texas. I've been a floor nurse, a hospice nurse, a case manager and a DON. I've written a blog about my hospice nurses for 10 years. And all I have to say about most of the replies here is that the lot of you have forgotten professional integrity. If you accept an assignment, you accept it as a professional. You do the job professionally. Politely. If she could not handle 2 students she should have said so.
    So get over it and realize that some nurses should not teach. Period. She accepted both students and failed at the assignment, period.
  5. by   Phoenix1963
    [QUOTE=doodlebuttRN;9300507]
    Quote from Stepney

    EXCUSE ME??!!! "If you have a BSN"? What does being a BSN have to do with being a professional or with understanding your job, teaching 'requirements' or not? I am really offended by this statement. I am an ADN of almost 14 years who has worked in hospitals, long term and LTAC, agency, and home health/private duty. I have taught and precepted in every area throughout my career. In fact, as floor supervisor then Assistant Director of Nursing at a LTC facility for almost 3 years, I precepted (and taught, if you can believe it) almost every new nurse that crossed the threshold. Many, if not most, were new grads. I loved it and was happy to do it. Imagine that, a mere ADN with years of experience teaching LPNs, ADNs, and BSNs.
    I think that YOU need to educate yourself. The wide world of nursing includes many levels of education, and your obvious disdain is disgusting and offensive (and impolite). If this is the attitude you exhibit toward your colleagues, I can understand why they have the attitude toward you they do. It brings a bad name to all nurses.

    (Sorry folks, I was REALLY offended by this post)
    I understand your feeling offended. I have a BSN, but on my first hospital job I was allowed to choose my preceptor. I chose the one who had the most experience and was willing to explain things to me. My boss's first words: "you do realize she is an LVN?" Yes I did- but she was the best choice in my eyes, and I never regretted it. The quality or professionalism of a nurse is not determined by the initials after the name on the badge- I've had LVNs and ADRNs that I would trust with my life, and BSNs that I wouldn't let care for a healthy pet. A good nurse is a good nurse, period.
  6. by   NurseLauraM
    Quote from Phoenix1963
    I knew I'd get this. And yet you all say the OP is wrong about nurses eating their young.

    Not the OP. I'm in Texas. I've been a floor nurse, a hospice nurse, a case manager and a DON. I've written a blog about my hospice nurses for 10 years. And all I have to say about most of the replies here is that the lot of you have forgotten professional integrity. If you accept an assignment, you accept it as a professional. You do the job professionally. Politely. If she could not handle 2 students she should have said so.
    So get over it and realize that some nurses should not teach. Period. She accepted both students and failed at the assignment, period.
    She did.
  7. by   Phoenix1963
    Quote from NurseLauraM
    She did.
    So why are you attacking the OP when her preceptor failed at her assignment?
  8. by   heron
    Quote from NurseLauraM
    She did.
    Sniped by NurseLauraM!
  9. by   heron
    Quote from Phoenix1963
    So why are you attacking the OP when her preceptor failed at her assignment?
    Because, like you, the OP seemed to feel that the nurse was not allowed to set limits on the demands made on her time and energy. She had a choice: do a lousy job with two students or do a decent job with one.
  10. by   NurseLauraM
    Quote from Phoenix1963
    So why are you attacking the OP when her preceptor failed at her assignment?
    The nurse wasn't her preceptor. If anyone failed his or her assignment it was the clinical instructor, who is the only one who actually agreed to educate the student. The nurse had no duty to the student. She did not "accept two students" as you say. You may believe she had some sort of moral duty, but she had no contractual obligation.

    You asked why the nurse didn't tell the student no. She did, which was well within her right, but the student kept asking. I understand this is a long thread but you might want to read through the entire thing because this should be obvious to you if you've read it.
  11. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from Phoenix1963
    I completely understand what the OP is saying and I agree- that nurse should not have been teaching student nurses. I have taught and oriented and mentored from my first hospital job. Yes- the brand new nurse had nursing students because the experienced nurses rebuffed them and wouldn't accept them. It was ********. And all of these critical comments sound just like what I experienced from my coworkers- excuses. That nurse had 3 patients. 3. THREE. She was not too busy. She was too lazy, disinterested, whatever. Nurses DO eat their young. Accept that and move on. Yes, this article was about HER NEEDS- she was the STUDENT. Writing about HER PERCEPTIONS AND EXPERIENCES. That kind of is expected if she is writing about what she personally experienced. How was she able to know what the preceding nurse thought? All she experienced was her actions. As such I don't see how all of these experienced psychic nurses know her account is unreliable. As a preceptor I have never been forced to take a student. I was asked. I knew I would have students. This was not a surprise. She just did not want to be bothered.
    While I would not DREAM of questioning your reading comprehension, I do doubt that you've read the entire thread. I'm also questioning the clarity of your writing -- this post comes across more as an angry student than as an experienced nurse.

    Which nurse should not be teaching students? The clinical instructor who did not make sure that her assignments weren't stepping on previously-made assignments? Or the experienced RN already mentoring a senior student?

    Which lazy nurse had only three patients and therefore was not too busy to mentor another student? The one that was already mentoring the senior student with an assignment that one assumes was made with the senior student in mind? That nurse wasn't "disinterested." She was protecting the interests of the senior student she had already agreed to precept. The "Cisabel Come Lately" needed to go back to her instructor and get a different assignment.

    Nurses don't eat their young. That's a fallacy perpetuated from some highly educated nurse speakers and writers, and has no doubt made them lots of money while convincing a generation of borderline nurses and students that their failures aren't their own, but instead they failed because a bunch of mean old "biter" nurses are setting them up to fail, bullying them or persecuting them in some other way. Most of what we see on this forum attributed to bullying or NETY is nothing of the sort -- including the original post. I'd venture an educated guess that the posters most convinced that NETY exists are either grasping at straws to avoid admitting that they aren't "getting it" or are themselves exhibiting some of the behaviors oft attributed to bullies.

    While you may find a bully here and there, nursing has no more bullies than the general population. Nurses don't eat their young. Accept that and move on.

    While I accept your premise that the original poster had no idea what the experienced nurse in her situation was thinking, the poster stated baldly, several times, that she didn't care about that nurse. She didn't care about the senior nursing student who would have been shortchanged or the patients. Writing from your own perspective is common; baldly stating that you do not care about the perspective of others is not. One would expect that someone who aspires to be a nurse would, in fact, care about others. One who does not is a poor candidate to be a nurse. As far as the "psychic experienced nurses who knew what the nurse thought" -- we don't know for sure what she thought. We only know what Cisabel said the nurse stated. When she stated that she was unable to precept Cisabel that day because she was already precepting a senior nursing student, it seems reasonable to conclude that she was thinking that she was unable to precept Cisabel that day because she was already precepting a senior nursing student. Very few people -- yourself and Cisabel among them -- had any difficulty understanding that. When Cisabel came BACK to the unit on her subsequent clinical rotation, it seems clear that the senior nurse would be thinking "This student is trouble -- I'm steering clear of her!" Although perhaps I'm projecting.

    If you in fact are a senior nurse who has precepted in the past, I'm glad for you that you WERE asked if you would like to take students. I assure you that is not always the case. And clearly, some clinical instructors who are making assignments don't always ascertain that the nurse they are assigning to their students is actually free to work with their students.

    Are we allowed, by TOS to say "sock puppet"?
  12. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from Phoenix1963
    I knew I'd get this. And yet you all say the OP is wrong about nurses eating their young.

    Not the OP. I'm in Texas. I've been a floor nurse, a hospice nurse, a case manager and a DON. I've written a blog about my hospice nurses for 10 years. And all I have to say about most of the replies here is that the lot of you have forgotten professional integrity. If you accept an assignment, you accept it as a professional. You do the job professionally. Politely. If she could not handle 2 students she should have said so.
    So get over it and realize that some nurses should not teach. Period. She accepted both students and failed at the assignment, period.
    The nurse in the OP SAID no. Cisabel refused to accept "no" as an answer, harbored a grudge for two years, and then went online to bash that nurse.

    No one here has forgotten professional integrity. Nor has the nurse in the original post. But I wonder about yours -- you seem particularly fired up about this outrageous scenerio. One could argue that professional integrity would exclude harboring a grudge for two years and then going online to publicly excoriate a nurse. (WHy now? Perhaps because she just found out that the senior nurse is on AN and Cisobel wanted to passive-aggressively give her "a piece of her mind"?
  13. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from Phoenix1963
    So why are you attacking the OP when her preceptor failed at her assignment?
    The "preceptor" refused to accept the assignment of precepting. She didn't fail in her assignment. She defended the time her senior student would need -- the assignment that she DID accept.

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