Nurses eat their young - now I understand why. - page 6

I started working for a sub-acute LTC as the DSD last week. The DON and I hit it off because we have the same vision on what we need to do in order to solve the problems we current have. Early this week, we posted an ad for... Read More

  1. 5
    I don't see anything wrong in the Vet's resume... except that you posted it. They probably DID do all of that- have you ever been in the back room of an emergency vet? It's crazy.
    MzSSDeSouza, beckster_01, SHGR, and 2 others like this.

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  2. 6
    I was watching this on Youtube and it made me think of this thread....

    Nola009, muesli, noyesno, and 3 others like this.
  3. 0
    Quote from tyloo
    I sense some arrogance on this thread. I don't get why there is bashing of the vet tech especially someone who is not here to defend himself/herself. Humans usually don't bite back and if you explained a procedure to them usually there is some cooperation. Little fluffy on the on the other hand will meet you in fright or aggression.

    Posting someone's portion of a resume on a nursing forum is not tactful either. People give a resume in confidence. What if the person who did this interview comes online and sees that? How would you feel? The person went to your facility for an interview not to be publicly ridiculed online.
    That vet tech really needs to work on her resume and approach to obtaining a nursing job. She's possibly a very bright, skilled person. That said, she really shouldn't list those skills worded in a way that proclaims competence in those things as it pertains to obtaining a nursing job. She has some great prior experience that could form the basis for an awesome resume, but it needs to emphasize potential ability, not current ability.

    As a new grad, one's approach should be more like "Hi, I'm Cletus, a new RN. I may be new, but am very eager to learn to be the best nurse possible." Not "Hi, I'm Albert Einstein, RN. I may be new, but I can manage 87 critically ill patients while implementing a new electronic medical record, all during my first shift."
  4. 5
    Didn't YOU post that you only recently received your RN license after previously being licensed as an LPN?("Graduated February 2012, took the nclex-rn March 6, licensed March 8 and got a job March 13 (4 business days after I received my license). I did not have a job all throughout nursing school. (http://allnurses.com/first-year-afte...ml#post6265266) " I don't suspect that the candidate or your employer provided you with the resumes to review with the intent that you would post excerpts on a public online forum to mock the writer...

    There are many experienced nurses that may have never informed a family member that their loved one has passed away..does that make them any less of a nurse than one who has done multiple death notifications? A nurse is a legal title describing an educated professional who meets certain educational and background standards that passed the national licensing exam and has subsequently been issued a license to practice by a board of nursing (or college of nursing in Canada).

    Even when a position is posted requiring 1-2 years experience those with little or no experience are going to apply for the position. However, it would seem that to be in a nursing leadership role a company would want an individual with some experience so that they are knowledgeable about how a unit needs to operate and can offer support and direction to other staff members in addition to having prove that they could function independently with minimal supervision.
    joanna73, Aurora77, Cougar1113, and 2 others like this.
  5. 2
    perpetual student, it sounds wonderful to say you are eager to learn. But, as someone who has been to resume classes and looked in books, etc. Employers hear "I am eager to learn" all the time. They actually want to know what you already know, so they don't have to spend time training you. Fact. I went on a job interview at the VA that was for a student nurse tech. It was meant to break someone into the system and train them. It was cardiac and I liked cardiac, but had zero experience. I told them "I have basic skills that are taught in nursing school, but I was eager to learn" when asked the question "what experience do you have in reading strips?". They asked about phlebotomy. I, at the time, had not drawn blood on someone or started IVs. I didn't get the job because I lacked experience. Someone who I know (who was an EMT) got the job. Later on in nursing school, I got the chance to draw blood and got it the first time. I also have gotten to start IVs and got a few of them and the few I did not get, I got them and then, they blew.

    So, you can't say "I know nothing, but I am eager to learn". The fact is they want experience. I think most jobs, whether you are a stay at home mom who balanced check books, who answered phones, who managed kids' schedules and kept them entertained and fed and dry or vet techs who started IVs, drew blood, cleaned poo, answered phones, etc.; all of them have something to offer.

    I think employers need to cut new grads a break. They start to come into their own the first year; but after a couple of months if they are still slightly awkward, they want to give them the boot or make it so unbearable, that they quit (lateral violence being the worst). I wish they would spend that turn over money on offering education classes in the Education Dept at the hospitals and hands on experience specifically in what they are weak on with a mentor for the new grads and other employees who may be a little weaker. Just my 2 cents.
    Rags2Riches RN and workingharder like this.
  6. 0
    Quote from melmarie23
    you are looking for inexperienced RNs....and only going to offer them 36 hours of "training." You're seriously limiting your pool of applicants there I think. Kinda hard to take a job seriously if they are unwilling to take you seriously. If desperate times call for desperate measures...why the pickiness? lol
    No, it is for a 36 hour position with training.
  7. 10
    Quote from Perpetual Student
    That vet tech really needs to work on her resume and approach to obtaining a nursing job. She's possibly a very bright, skilled person. That said, she really shouldn't list those skills worded in a way that proclaims competence in those things as it pertains to obtaining a nursing job. She has some great prior experience that could form the basis for an awesome resume, but it needs to emphasize potential ability, not current ability.

    As a new grad, one's approach should be more like "Hi, I'm Cletus, a new RN. I may be new, but am very eager to learn to be the best nurse possible." Not "Hi, I'm Albert Einstein, RN. I may be new, but I can manage 87 critically ill patients while implementing a new electronic medical record, all during my first shift."
    Unless the applicant worded the resume like this:

    Previous Job Experience:

    Veterinary Technician 09/2006-12/2011

    Job requirements: Assist the veterinarian with a variety of tests, procedures, surgeries and examinations. Perform medication administration, procedures, and assessments as needed. Provide education to owners for multiple medical conditions. Coordinate follow-up care...

    Skills:
    See excerpt


    If those skills were listed specifically in relation to the job as a Vet Tech, then it would be entirely appropriate to list them all just as they were. I agree that if she were trying to make it seem as though the skills applied to humans, it would be misleading, but we don't have any indication that that's what she did. Unfortunately, the OP only included the part of the resume that best made her point. Without seeing the entire thing, it's wrong to pass judgement.
  8. 7
    Sorry - disagree with you PerpetualStudent that the vet tech is inflating his or her skills.

    Neither of us can see for certain, but I'd be willing to bet that the excerpted experience posted (shamelessly by the OP) are bulleted points under the job title (vet tech) that he or she held. They stated the facts. Those skills are relevant - and I do not see distortion or exaggeration. The vet tech's listing of those skills under their prior job title is in no way indicating that they "can manage 87 critically ill patients while implementing a new electronic medical record..." Many people do not realize what vet techs do. There are also a range of responsibilities per vet tech position. I still say the vet tech has done a great job of outlining how their prior experience in animals will help them in the first nursing job.

    And as others have said, the OP is out-of-bounds with excerpting part of the job applicant's resume. The OP is tough on applicants not knowing core measures...what about knowing HR measures?
    diva rn, hgrimmett, Horseshoe, and 4 others like this.
  9. 6
    Well. I must say that I have noticed LTC have an affinity for hiring the inexperienced for director, charge, manager positions. They are cheaper, less rigid, and eager to please. They can be "trained" in the "right" manner.......which means to say yes to corporate. The OP seems to be also inexperienced as you screen those applicants resume for who is going to come on for interviewing.

    I will, however, agree that there is a different in applicants the last couple of years. I have interviewed some with outstanding resumes, only to sit slack jawed at the audacity and the demands of the person being interviewed. It's obvious they have paid for their resumes and while not false, have been embellished to get in the door. While I can admire creativity and ambition to get get in the door it unfortunately doesn't translate to attitude and willingness to work. It's like they want to be paid and not have to come to work.

    I agree that when interviewing and the stuff that come out of applicants mouth makes me wonder what has happened to society. What could they possibly be thinking when they open their mouths. Before I can even say my name I was getting.......I expect x$ to be paid. I don't do Sundays or nights......I don't adjust well. I need every other Wednesday off for my art class... Blah, Blah, Blah. I can't tell you how I wish for a stat page or a code to be called just to get out of the interview and not have to lie.

    I don't want to eat the young, as I have always embraced the incoming new nurses to join me in the profession I so love. But there are times I wonder......what the heck are they teaching in school??????
    TiddlDwink, silverbat, netglow, and 3 others like this.
  10. 10
    Quote from Perpetual Student
    That vet tech really needs to work on her resume and approach to obtaining a nursing job.
    I agree. It seems like she's a new nurse with loads of skills from a previous career who needs some assistance w/ writing a decent resume to get started in her new profession.
    She needs a friend or a mentor. Writing resume's and interviewing for jobs can be very awkward, miserable, stressful, etc--especially when you're new.

    I am appalled that the OP--who is responsible for interviewing prospective new nurses for a charge position at the facility she works for--is frankly bashing her candidates in an online forum. That is beyond unprofessional. Posting that CV is totally out of line.

    OP, it's fine to be unimpressed with your interviewees. But what gives you the right to utterly degrade them so openly? They are just people trying to find jobs. I mean seriously--what would your employer think?!?
    hgrimmett, Horseshoe, klone, and 7 others like this.


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