Nurses eat their young - now I understand why. - page 12

I started working for a sub-acute LTC as the DSD last week. The DON and I hit it off because we have the same vision on what we need to do in order to solve the problems we current have. Early this week, we posted an ad for... Read More

  1. 0
    I've heard all this and more too! I do know that there are some very capable new RNs out there, they are the ones who have worked at least in a year or 2 in an acute care setting, & NO, school does not count as "experience"! They are the ones who have worked weekends, holidays, and off shifts, who have actually gotten some good assessment skills. They don't expect every holiday weekend or spring break off, they understand that it's not "all about me". They don't ask to leave early when it's busy or hang around when it's not-- texting, flirting, talking about their social agenda. Yes, these awesome newer nurses w/a WORK ETHIC are getting harder & harder to find, but they are out there. If you are wondering why you're not finding the "ideal job" - here's a clue: it doesn't exist. The best thing these new grads can do to get the experience, 6th sense & the skills you THINK you already have is apply for jobs at a teaching hospital, get in an internship or mentoring program even if it's not your chosen area & LEARN. The things you learn will be invaluable to you in the long run in ways you can't even imagine. Speaking from firsthand experience, nothing cures whining & entitlement like education AND practical experience!!

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  2. 1
    Quote from anononurse
    I've heard all this and more too! I do know that there are some very capable new RNs out there, they are the ones who have worked at least in a year or 2 in an acute care setting
    I'll take it a step further... worked in most any professional setting for a few years... or are former military with an Honorable Discharge.
    anononurse likes this.
  3. 0
    Quote from RN_Marie
    - New RN grad said she's been working as a CNA and knows she can do the job because there's not much difference between being a charge nurse and CNA
    - New RN grad said that she'll consider our offer, so I asked if she is being offered another position (as we need someone full time). She said she's expecting an offer any day now since she finished the online application earlier this week (and she was not kidding).
    - Someone coming into the interview with a wrinkled nose and irked expression and said that she can smell the BM from the floor
    - Someone who wrote "expert in IV medication preparation"; when asked what's their experience on it, she stated she's been a vet nurse and she's been doing those a lot.
    - Someone who said they are not available for the first two weeks of April as they are going on a cruise
    - Someone asking for the pay, end up telling me that new grad RNs in LA are paid $34/hr starting at the beginning of the interview.
    - When asked about core measures, all of them couldn't deliver one intelligent answer.

    and a lot more...
    Please post the rest of these "findings" from your pile of applications. I love them. Thanks for posting. You have made my day.
  4. 2
    I don't see the difference between starting and preparing IVs on animals and doing the same on people. Veins are veins, and they use the same equipment- we used to donate outdated tubing to a vet clinic at one hospital I worked at. Yes, different locations for the veins but basically the same procedures. I would gladly leave nursing to work as a vet nurse if they had decent pay. I would never look back.

    As for the cruise, I agree that she was just letting you know up front in case you had big orientation plans. Better to know up front and if you want to hold that against her so be it.

    Interviews are harrowing. People are trying to sound confident and knowledgeable. It can come off as cocky but sometimes they are just trying too hard. I have had some horrible interviews myself- including one time when I fell down the stairs when leaving. Bet that made a good impression!
    CompleteUnknown and Merlyn like this.
  5. 7
    As a person, as a humanist, as an experienced RN with management time I found your posting less than inspiring. I got several hints from your posting about where the real arrogance might be. Were you supplying us with an example of a nurse- yourself- eating their young? "Trainable" RNs you say? What's that supposed to mean beyond its putative connotation? The non-trainable ones would be perhaps a tad mentally retarded? Is that what the Boards of Nursing are doing, licensing RNs who passed the boards but yet might be not "trainable"? It takes a great amount of arrogance and disrespect for the profession even to think of RNs as "trainable". Second evidence: the thing with core measures. That's administrative realm knowledge at this poin, mind you. To put down the applicants because they don't know yet another set of corporate buzzwords it's indicative that those nurses are most likely better off not working for you. I'm afraid you have displayed here, several handicaps when it comes to a fundamental sense of perspective, temperance in judgment and regard for others. You know that nurse you mentioned as wrinkling her nose during the interview on account of the smell of BM in your facility? Well, I'm afraid it's not the only stinking factor, far and wide... Some serious training in facilitative leadership for you and your DON is in order. And, please, get rid of that smell, will you?
    diva rn, melmarie23, carme1976, and 4 others like this.
  6. 1
    Quote from RN_Marie
    I started working for a sub-acute LTC as the DSD last week. The DON and I hit it off because we have the same vision on what we need to do in order to solve the problems we current have.

    Early this week, we posted an ad for RN charge nurse with no experience required. We feel it's best to have trainable nurses even though they lack experience. I was tasked to interview for the position as I will be the one training them for the first 36-hours.

    Needless to say, I was flabbergasted with the array of applicants we had and now know why the some nurses eat their young.
    - New RN grad said she's been working as a CNA and knows she can do the job because there's not much difference between being a charge nurse and CNA
    - New RN grad said that she'll consider our offer, so I asked if she is being offered another position (as we need someone full time). She said she's expecting an offer any day now since she finished the online application earlier this week (and she was not kidding).
    - Someone coming into the interview with a wrinkled nose and irked expression and said that she can smell the BM from the floor
    - Someone who wrote "expert in IV medication preparation"; when asked what's their experience on it, she stated she's been a vet nurse and she's been doing those a lot.
    - Someone who said they are not available for the first two weeks of April as they are going on a cruise
    - Someone asking for the pay, end up telling me that new grad RNs in LA are paid $34/hr starting at the beginning of the interview.
    - When asked about core measures, all of them couldn't deliver one intelligent answer.

    and a lot more...

    Looking back, I asked myself if I ever acted as arrogant and privileged as the ones I encountered. Most of the ones the new grads I interviewed have this air... like they have mastered a craft. Like I should be rolling out the red carpet for them.
    I do understand why nurses eat their young. i was totally committed to the opposite and was always helpful and available when training new nurses. But, I left my position b/c I couldn't justify training nurses who only seemed dedicated to themselves. I often heard comments like "this job is cuttin into my Me time", "if I have to work that weekend I'll just quit", "I can get a job anywhere I want, any day of the week", and a new grad thinking it wasn't fair b/c she didn't get to tell management what days she wanted to work! by the way the same nurse was clueless about anything beyond nursing 101 and when caught not checking on a pt. who she knew was in sinus brady at 35 BPM, she just said she didn't know anything about it. she is now charging and i feel sorry for the pts and other nurses who will suffer from her lack of concern about anyones's welfare but her own. her sense of entitlement was so ingrained that her entire perspective on live was twisted by it , but she had no clue how depraved her thinking was. She thought there was something wrong with everyone else. unfortunately, though she was probably the worst example, she wasn't the only one. very sad to see this happen and to know how detrimental this attitude can be.
    Merlyn likes this.
  7. 1
    Quote from yuzzamatuzz
    From looking at your previous posts you just became an RN yourself less than three weeks ago. I am going to throw the same question that you asked right back at you: can you honestly say that you are a Registered Nurse when you have never functioned as one?

    You lack RN experience and are working as the Director of Staff Development. You are hiring/training charge RNs with no RN experience yourself. I don't understand how YOU will train an RN to be charge nurse when you have never worked as an RN. Your lack of experience became obvious when you posted the resume of one of your applicants on a public forum. I'll add that it also looks like you became in LPN in 2006. I respect LPNs entirely but they have a different role than RNs...working as an LPN does not qualify you to train RNs! You're not so different from these applicants you look down upon.

    Your facility seems to be sacrificing safety for cost-effectiveness. Maybe you should reevaluate where you are working.

    Well said. Posting that resume was a low point, imo.
    chevyv likes this.
  8. 3
    as a person, as a humanist, as an experienced rn with management time i found your posting less than inspiring. i got several hints from your posting about where the real arrogance might be. were you supplying us with an example of a nurse- yourself- eating their young? "trainable" rns you say? what's that supposed to mean beyond its putative connotation? the non-trainable ones would be perhaps a tad mentally retarded? is that what the boards of nursing are doing, licensing rns who passed the boards but yet might be not "trainable"? it takes a great amount of arrogance and disrespect for the profession even to think of rns as "trainable". second evidence: the thing with core measures. that's administrative realm knowledge at this poin, mind you. to put down the applicants because they don't know yet another set of corporate buzzwords it's indicative that those nurses are most likely better off not working for you. i'm afraid you have displayed here, several handicaps when it comes to a fundamental sense of perspective, temperance in judgment and regard for others. you know that nurse you mentioned as wrinkling her nose during the interview on account of the smell of bm in your facility? well, i'm afraid it's not the only stinking factor, far and wide... some serious training in facilitative leadership for you and your don is in order. and, please, get rid of that smell, will you?
  9. 0
    Quote from smt456
    I do understand why nurses eat their young. i was totally committed to the opposite and was always helpful and available when training new nurses. But, I left my position b/c I couldn't justify training nurses who only seemed dedicated to themselves. I often heard comments like "this job is cuttin into my Me time", "if I have to work that weekend I'll just quit", "I can get a job anywhere I want, any day of the week", and a new grad thinking it wasn't fair b/c she didn't get to tell management what days she wanted to work! by the way the same nurse was clueless about anything beyond nursing 101 and when caught not checking on a pt. who she knew was in sinus brady at 35 BPM, she just said she didn't know anything about it. she is now charging and i feel sorry for the pts and other nurses who will suffer from her lack of concern about anyones's welfare but her own. her sense of entitlement was so ingrained that her entire perspective on live was twisted by it , but she had no clue how depraved her thinking was. She thought there was something wrong with everyone else. unfortunately, though she was probably the worst example, she wasn't the only one. very sad to see this happen and to know how detrimental this attitude can be.
    "The scum always raises to the top of the water" -- Jesse Ventura
  10. 1
    I'm pretty sure Jesse the Body didn't coin that one. He's not that clever.
    OCNRN63 likes this.


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