Nurse with Disdain - page 6

Hi. I've got to vent here, since I have no "friends" that are nurses, and I want the input of some perhaps unbiased individuals. I'm a mid-30s male career changer. I left a career I had for a... Read More

  1. Visit  Violach} profile page
    7
    Omg, I'm working on my BSN now...prior to this, I was a flight attendant for several years. It used to infuriate me when needy passengers would ring the call light over and over and over.... I will have to deal with this yet again, just in a different setting. Awesome.
    Szasz_is_Right, AnonRNC, netglow, and 4 others like this.
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  3. Visit  lallajo} profile page
    3
    On that note, I totally get where StuckintheMiddle is coming from, and EMT (less time in training than Paramedic) or Paramedic may have been a good choice. I come from a Paramedic background (10 years) and chose to go into Nursing to (hopefully) find a bit more stable of a schedule, and of course, better pay, and also for personal reasons related to ambulance work that are hard to explain. I never wanted to work in a hospital setting for the exact reasons Stuck mentions, and I suppose short visits are what I'm used to (treating patients in the back of an ambulance for a short amount of time and then turning them over to the ER). I'm still finishing my RN program (6 months to go - fingers crossed!!), and somehow found myself working as an LPN in a spinal cord injury unit (read also - long term, inpatient care), and I absolutely HATE it! I dread going to work! I don't like having the same whiney, entitled, patients for 8 hours at a time, I don't like having those same patients for 3 shifts in a row, I'm tired of being swore at and treated like crap by both patients and families, and I don't like arrogant Charge Nurses (I know not all RNs/Charge Nurses are arrogant) who take the easy assignments and give the LPNs all the really hard work and sit back on their #$%% and watch while we run around like maniacs. I can't be without a job, so I can't quit at this point. I do have resumes and applications out there all over the place, and am excited about a clinic job I recently interviewed for, as well as a recent interview for a job teaching First Responder/EMT classes. I also hope to do some ER work once I'm done with my RN (hopefully!) I know this makes me sound like a terribly cold-hearted person who should never have gone into nursing, but that's truly not the case. I actually do enjoy working with patients, and being around people, and I'm proud to be a nurse. I just feel as though I made the most ginormous mistake ever applying for this current job. I have discovered what I kindof always knew - that inpatient/LTC is most definately not my cup of tea. Good luck StuckintheMiddle!!
    GrnTea, Fiona59, and anotherone like this.
  4. Visit  wooh} profile page
    13
    Quote from Violach
    Omg, I'm working on my BSN now...prior to this, I was a flight attendant for several years. It used to infuriate me when needy passengers would ring the call light over and over and over.... I will have to deal with this yet again, just in a different setting. Awesome.
    I often think of flight attendants as our sisters (and brothers) in the sky. Just like nurses, the primary responsibility is to keep everyone safe. But exactly like nurses, the public thinks the primary responsibility is to bring beverages.
    LibraSunCNM, monkeybug, AnonRNC, and 10 others like this.
  5. Visit  LillyFish} profile page
    4
    Dear StuckInTheMiddle,
    If you're still reading, I just wanted you to know that I hear ya. Some people who are career changers and go into nursing, go because they think it'll be a good fit. No amount of researching and exploring could have prepared you for what the nursing profession actually is. Unfortunately for some of us, it just isn't a good fit for our personalities, lifestyles, etc. It's not at all what we expected. It's not just the patients, it's also the environment, especially in the hospital. I get it. I truly do. And so do others. I'm sure there are a lot of nurses on this forum who are contemplating their options. And others who have left this forum because they figured out what to do with their lives outside of nursing. Best of luck to you.
    Sisyphus, Szasz_is_Right, netglow, and 1 other like this.
  6. Visit  Oldest&Ugliest} profile page
    1
    Quote from kguill975
    If you don't mind working around inmates, I think you may be a good fit for a correctional NP. Those positions usually pay very well, and the inmates are transferred out if they're REALLY ill. Most of the time, they pretend something is wrong, because they want a trip to the hospital. Seriously, you should look into it, or maybe an occupational NP in a plant. Those pay even better, and all you do is push paperwork and do yearly physicals. See if you can get a clinical placement and try them both out. Good Luck to you.
    I agree - you might like it.
    anotherone likes this.
  7. Visit  mclennan} profile page
    7
    I'd like to also voice my understanding for the OP. While I may not feel the way he does every day on the job, I get what he means.

    Sounds to me like he's a ex-military guy who bought into the BS nursing schools sell, telling us nursing is an "applied science" that utilizes all kinds of deep technical skills & hard scientific knowledge. Then he got into the real field - and discovered what so many of us have, that nursing has devolved into a role of overpaid babysitter of people with zero personal accountability who widely abuse the system. That would rub ANY person with a military background the wrong way.

    It's too bad. I think he could reconcile his value system with this profession if he found the right job. I GTFO of bedside and into case management purely so I'd never have to answer a whiny call bell or play beverage servant ever again.
    C-lion, Sisyphus, Szasz_is_Right, and 4 others like this.
  8. Visit  wanderlust99} profile page
    2
    If you hate nursing now, don't try to become a nurse practioner. It's the same BS. Just quit nursing all together if you hate it. Life is too short to do something you hate.
    macawake and anotherone like this.
  9. Visit  BrandonLPN} profile page
    5
    I sympathize with the OP, but I can't help but wonder, what exactly did he think nursing was? It always surprises me when I see posters here who have invested so much time and money in pursuit of a career that they clearly knew nothing about.
    Altra, macawake, GrnTea, and 2 others like this.
  10. Visit  grpman} profile page
    4
    Your post could be seen with a fair amount of irony. Your reason for being sarcastic is due to spending a lot of time (shift from H E L L) with the same people the OP is tired of dealing with. I think you might be able to relate to him, although just a little, if you tried to forget your horrible shift filled with needy people.


    Quote from barbyann
    Change your major to Healthcare Administration. No, and I mean NO! proximity to pts. and you get to make pie charts and line graphs all f'in day. Goals are set and you get to make rules up as you go along. You will stay clean and dry, keep lysol in your bottom drawer in case a c-differ walks by, though if you keep your office door closed you can avoid it all together. You can explain all these serious medical conditions to the foundation members who, if you spin it just right, can donate a new player piano for the lobby.

    Seriously, I just had a shift from H E L L and the thought of a grown adult getting into a NP track and not knowing that their would be sick, needy people on road to his "goal" floors me. PAY YOUR DUES...............then go NP.

    I promise to apologize for this post tomorrow, but the way I'm feeling right now it stands.
    Szasz_is_Right, Altra, anotherone, and 1 other like this.
  11. Visit  Streamline2010} profile page
    5
    Quote from Radnurse54
    There appears to be one thing missing in all these posts. The problem my friend in fact might not be the job, but that you have an unrealistic expectation and seem to be egocentric in your search for "the job". You want excitement, purpose and interest, but it has to be on your terms, interesting that you have found ANY job to meet your expectations.
    Perhaps you would be better served by looking inside, if in fact you are able to see that you may have faults, and start there.way, I co
    I dont think it is the profession......its the person.
    Bah. I think it's both. Nursing just may be too much futzing around without any clear "wins," for most of us who came to it from some career other than wife and mother. Closer to a motherhood role is how I'd describe it. The confines of the nurse role are one of the things I struggled with in RN school, and perhaps because I was in a diploma program that put me into the bedside nursing role in the first term, I was getting the same vibe as the OP but within 3 months, lol. I quit after 1 year. I thought nursing had evolved and finally empowered RNs, but it is still too a women's profession. One of the things I found tiresome was, like the OP said, constant barrage of needy people. It's a HUGE change from working with the well-educated and very self-reliant and successful, and the decisive, if that's what the OP was used to.

    I think what the people (women, in particular) who have spent long or entire careers in nursing don't realize is that careers outside the medical field, professions like business and manufacturing, do offer and in fact require much more autonomy of their employees. Nurses lack power. Period. And patients too often see nurses as servants or mamma. A subordinate role. Subordinate to the MD/DO, subordinate to Administration, subordinate to the patients. Heck, to everyone. There was a male nurse on here who also said the same thing: Nurses have no power. Adult males who come into nursing identify that problem with it immediately, because that situation is so different from other workplaces.

    If you look at sales, or engineering, or half a dozen other things, they are goal-oriented. They turn well-trained employees loose to get their jobs done. And rude and abusive clients get shown the door, or the police are called.

    I got no satisfaction from nursing. I've done engineering process design, QA/QC for the metals industry, and some positively menial jobs while living in small town rural America. Nursing school was the only occupational role that ever annoyed Hail out of me, because it put me into the servant role constantly and more importantly, I never went home with a sense of "winning."

    Probably the OP would have been happier with med school and becoming a doctor. Most of the engineers and chemists I know who went into med became DOs, actually. And they are quite happy with that career choice, if not with the downward pressure on wages, lol.
    Sisyphus, Szasz_is_Right, netglow, and 2 others like this.
  12. Visit  Fiona59} profile page
    1
    Quote from CrunchRN
    The issue, now and when you become an NP is that if patients do not perceive you as warm and fuzzy at least a little they will give you bad reviews and that will cause you problems.

    Have you thought about the military? It would not be a huge issue there I wouldn't think.

    Can you be a little warm & fuzzy and work in urgent care or somewhere like that where you see them once and quickly?
    My first thought was he's retired military! OK, read more and he is military. Reading between the lines he was a medic in special ops. Totally different outlook to life/work.

    He's going through a huge change in his life and doesn't know how to deal with it.

    Has he thought of working in military hospitals?
    Last edit by Fiona59 on Jan 24, '13
    anotherone likes this.
  13. Visit  Streamline2010} profile page
    4
    Quote from mclennan
    I'd like to also voice my understanding for the OP. While I may not feel the way he does every day on the job, I get what he means.

    Sounds to me like he's a ex-military guy who bought into the BS nursing schools sell, telling us nursing is an "applied science" that utilizes all kinds of deep technical skills & hard scientific knowledge. Then he got into the real field - and discovered what so many of us have, that nursing has devolved into a role of overpaid babysitter of people with zero personal accountability who widely abuse the system. That would rub ANY person with a military background the wrong way.

    It's too bad. I think he could reconcile his value system with this profession if he found the right job. I GTFO of bedside and into case management purely so I'd never have to answer a whiny call bell or play beverage servant ever again.

    ^ Amen. I bought into that, too. Then after a year of RN school, and I still hadn't seen ANY use for my tech and science backgorund, except pharma and its calculations, I began to suspect I'd never get to use stuff anymore. Science? What science? What deep breadth and depth of knowledge? The people in my cohort have just graduated and passed the NCLEX. *Most of them didn't even read the textbooks in the library, much less buy them.* I asked them how they got passing test scores all the time, because I was knocking myself out trying to read it all and assimilate it all, and it was burying me. They said they just went over and over their Powerpoint handouts from class. And got Cs all the time. One of them even said that as soon as she takes the test, she forgets all about whatever she just crammed for, and moves on to the next exam content. Short-term thinking. But they passed exams, and passed the NCLEX, and now they are new-grad nurses.

    Silly me! I thought I was supposed to actually learn it and understand it all thoroughly, and be able to apply it, because I might have to use it in the future. I could not reconcile my standards and value system with nursing school, even. To me, a string of Cs was um, not good enough. lol
    Szasz_is_Right, netglow, anotherone, and 1 other like this.
  14. Visit  cassiecartwr} profile page
    5
    Hi I signed up with this site just to reply to you. I have been in this field for thirty years and this is what I know. There is room for a wide variety of personality types in this business. I myself loathe nursing and spent my entire career getting away from patients. Did 16 years working nights and weekends in neonatal intensive care. Patients don't talk back and if you work in a large state referral unit few parents. Don't work in the town baby factory lots of patience intensive upwardly mobile types there. Someone suggested Workmans comp case management. You have to listen to a lot of malingerers telling you why they can't work anymore because they lifted a box. However, in insurance there are plenty of positions that are brain intensive in regulatory, compliance and my personal favorite fraud. You never talk to patients in those positions. You rarely talk to providers and you are contributing to the good of the country at the same time by identifying waste and fraud. With a Master's I would go into education, not nursing basic education but continuing education. There you say your piece and then leave. Another avenue would be public policy. That is a great field for a bright analytical person.

    Bottom line don't give up. If I can be happy in nursing anyone can be. Just look for anything nurses can do that involves the education we have. Leave the bed side nursing to the nurturers and the refrigerator RNs. Cassie RN BS
    Szasz_is_Right, grpman, anotherone, and 2 others like this.


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