New breed of bullies! - page 3

Hi everyone! I am looking for advice on how to handle a few co-workers I have the unfortunate honor of dealing with frequently. In the ER I work in, there is a "click" that consists of some... Read More

  1. by   ANnot4me
    I have worked in the ICU, PACU and med/surg. None of what has been described here is unique to the ER.
  2. by   sjoe
    Tink writes: "The next logical step ofcourse would be to approach management"

    WRONG. The next logical step is, as was advised above:

    "Continue to stay to yourself, smile, and be cordial"

    If you plan on doing ANYTHING other than that, what are your goals? What would you be trying to accomplish, and is this YOUR job? To change these people's personalities? To break up the clique and have them not function together as a team? To "get even" with them for making you feel left out when you first worked there? To "rescue" and "save" new ER employees from this kind of treatment? Did the new employees ASK you to do this? Would they stand behind you if you stir the pot now, after 2 years? No way.

    Unless you need to feel like it is "Tink to the rescue," simply learn from the treatment you received, don't treat new people like this yourself, and move on.

    If you DO, however, need to feel like the rescuer, I'd suggest you update your resume first.
  3. by   Teshiee
    Screw management. I have worked with known trouble makers and nothing gets done because the manager doesn't want to squelch the problem until his or ass is on the line and that means their boss. I wouldn't want any of this in my face when a manager should have dealt with it swiftly to the point.
  4. by   MrsWampthang
    There is a nurse in the ER where I work who is over 6 ft tall and uses every inch of her height to try and intimidate her coworkers. She is a good nurse when she wants to be, but has also been well known to be a lazy, backstabbing, student nurses are my personal slaves, type of person. She has no qualms about speaking her mind and calling someone down in front of coworkers about some mistake they have made, or she thinks they made. I really can't stand working with her and I am not alone in this.
    Understand, if I have made a mistake, I want it called to my attention, however, in the nurses station, in front of secretaries, registrars and other nurses is not the appropriate or professional thing to do. It seems to me that if you see a fellow nurse doing something that you think is wrong, then you should take them aside and tell them privately, (if that is the appropriate to the situation) and go from there. Or at least not loudy announce to people who have no business knowing what is going on with a pt that that pt has had something not done for them that YOU thought should be done.

    JMHO, Pam
  5. by   Tink RN
    Thanks guys for all your input! The original post was in July, and much to my surprise some things have actually changed some what. The "clique" spontaniously combusted. Two of the nurses fell out with each other (I guess they ran out of victims worthy of harrassment) so the group had to choose one and was divided into two sides, now they mostly harrass each other! The funny thing is they approached management about each other, now the whole department has to attend a mandatory "Dealing with difficult behavior" seminar. Life is sweet. Ofcourse there continues to be and always will be difficult behaviors to deal with, but at least they can stir up chaos amongst themselves. I am still shocked to observe such behavior from "professional" adults.

    For the record, SJoe - last time I checked, I didn't have a "S" on my chest. Obviously you are right, minding my own business was the appropriate action in the long run. I hate it because I have watched alot of good nurses leave our department that confided in me the reason they decided to leave, but didn't inform management simply because they didn't want to be labeled as "difficult" when they transfered departments. Perhaps thing will go smoother for now until those two kiss and make up.
  6. by   TlhRNED
    Kudos to you for sticking to yourself and doing your job as a professional! The behaviors of others only shows their own ignorance! Do not allow yourself to get involved with those "types". Yes, they are out there everywhere, probably in every ED across the country. Your managers and administration know who they are- they will eventually destroy themselves.
  7. by   CarolineRn
    You're attitude is the ONLY attitude that will work with bullies like this. I've learned this from various other jobs and am lucky enough to say that I haven't witnessed this firsthand yet in nursing. I am about to graduate in December, and all throughout clincials RNs have been supportive and welcoming so far. I work in a cardiac ICU and have been offered a position upon gradutaion on that floor and ALL the RNs are very good people. Based on *my* experience, I would recommend nursing as a profession in a heartbeat. I've never been a Pollyanna, but I have to say most RN's *I* have met are very much like you, Vee. They know their stuff, and can handle any situation that comes along.

    IMO, there are MANY more supportive nurses than there are nasty ones. This board is a testament to that.

    So if I may offer advice to the original poster, either get tough right back or start looking for another job. You deserve better, and better *is* out there.

    My best to you.
  8. by   eldernurse
    Unfortunately, every job has its group of a$$holes working. Sometimes they outnumber us and sometimes we outnumber them. I came to our ER 2 years ago when management had just changed over and the breaking up of the nasty clique had begun. A nurse that I had fought and argued with for a long time (when I was a floor nurse) left about a year after I came on board. Now, my ER is a nice place to work (except for the patients ha ha).
  9. by   wayover20
    All you have to do is take care of your patients in the best manner you can, act professional, ask questions of WHOEVER you think can help you the best regardless if they're part of the click or not. If they see you're there to do what you were hired for, they will respect you and eventually come to ASK if they can help you. Alot of times....whether it's right or not....some people want to see how far they can get in intimidating, scaring, new nurses. It's almost a test of sorts to see "whatcha got". Alot of people are territorial and newbies go thru crap with them. Believe me, if they see you mean business and can't push your buttons, they'll back off. If not, a talk with your nurse manager is in order. And put it in writing.
  10. by   LuciGirl
    Regarding the posted comment, I am reminded of the following quote:

    "YOU must be the change you wish to see in the world." Gandhi

    The "Don't Get Involved" option is an individual choice, but I think it is important to not BLAME and LABEL others who would like to see improvement made that will impact the bottom line for all, including patients. A uniform code of conduct that flows with an organizations's mission statement helps all work to do what we are employed to do - care responsibly for patients. In the midst of abusive and intimidating behaviors, we can no longer assume that patient care is not negatively impacted by workplace mobbing. Lead by example. Provide ongoing education that reinforces commitment to a CARING and RESPECTFUL culture. Enforce ZERO TOLERANCE for workplace mobbing.
    -------------------------------------
    Quote from sjoe
    Tink writes: "The next logical step ofcourse would be to approach management"

    WRONG. The next logical step is, as was advised:

    "Continue to stay to yourself, smile, and be cordial"

    If you plan on doing ANYTHING other than that, what are your goals? What would you be trying to accomplish, and is this YOUR job? To change these people's personalities? To break up the clique and have them not function together as a team? To "get even" with them for making you feel left out when you first worked there? To "rescue" and "save" new ER employees from this kind of treatment? Did the new employees ASK you to do this? Would they stand behind you if you stir the pot now, after 2 years? No way.

    Unless you need to feel like it is "Tink to the rescue," simply learn from the treatment you received, don't treat new people like this yourself, and move on.

    If you DO, however, need to feel like the rescuer, I'd suggest you update your resume first.
  11. by   teeituptom
    Welcome to the wonderfull world of ER Nursing
  12. by   prmenrs
    This thread is a year old, LuciGirl. Can you just check the date before you respond to a thread? Thanks.

    And Tom? Can you get a new line, that one's very old?
  13. by   cannoli
    If responding to old threads is a problem, then why aren't they closed?

close