leaving my job gave a 2 weeks manager very rude. - page 7

by purpleRN6163 16,050 Views | 73 Comments

I am an RN and just got hired onto a new facility. I have been driving 50 miles one way to work and wanted to find a hospital to work at closer to my home, which I did. I turned in my notice I asked for my last shift to be 1 week... Read More


  1. 1
    When did four weeks become the professional standard? It's always been two weeks as long as I can remember. Two weeks as a minimum is enough notice.
    redhead_NURSE98! likes this.
  2. 0
    Four weeks professional standard for many RN positions as = # weeks vacation/year.
  3. 0
    Quote from SweettartRN
    I am there to work with them. I don't become friends with the people I work with, and I don't "hang out" after work or become overly familiar. I keep my boundaries up. I am friendly, but not familiar.
    That doesn't really answer my question. Consideration and professional respect does not = being friends or hanging out.
  4. 0
    Agree with Karen. 2 weeks notice is for the fry guy at McDonalds. If you want to be thought of as a professional, act like one. Nowhere in the professional world is 2 weeks notice acceptable. Professional positions require 4 weeks, minimum. It is simply understood.

    The last hospital I worked for always required 6 weeks minimum or you were automatically "not for rehire." Just try getting another job anywhere, ever, if one of the top 5 medical centers in the country has labeled you "not for rehire," lol. Everyone worked their 6 weeks notice!

    My present position requires 120 business days notice! How do you like them apples?
    Last edit by BlueDevil,DNP on Nov 21, '12
  5. 1
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    When did four weeks become the professional standard? It's always been two weeks as long as I can remember. Two weeks as a minimum is enough notice.
    Not really. In professional circles, three-four weeks is the bare minimum; three weeks will oftentimes still get you the eye-roll. Last place I worked it was laid out in the employee handbook that the number of weeks' vacation the employee had dictated the length of time for resignation notice. On the floors, the schedules were done for a month at a time and if you were giving notice just before or at the time of the new posting, you were still expected to finish the scheduled shifts.

    The higher up your position, the harder it is to replace you, so....more notice is required.
    NRSKarenRN likes this.
  6. 1
    I'm kinda surprised so many people apparently have 4 weeks of vacation. I was under the impression two weeks a year was the norm.

    And, for whatever it's worth, for all of my "real" jobs I, too, have given about a month's notice. But I still feel two weeks is sufficient. The bare minimum, but sufficient.
    redhead_NURSE98! likes this.
  7. 3
    I might "earn" 4 weeks PTO a year, but lord help me if I try to actually take all that time, and never never never think I would get more than 2 weeks off at a time. Truth be told, I haven't had 2 weeks "vacation" time since 2006 not counting the year I was out 2 weeks on antibiotics for sinusitus/bronchitis/pneumonia.

    To the OP, you can't expect your manager to be anything but huffy if you leave at this time of year. It's considered a not nice thing to do. But you do what is best for you and if you promised (even under duress) to work a full two weeks, then follow through.

    15 years ago I quit my first nursing job in a huff. I'll admit I did it at this time of the year as a special "gift" to my hospital for what I considered poor treatment. I also wanted to work just short of 2 weeks, but gave into the manager's demands I work out my full 2 weeks. She wasn't happy with me but I finished it out. Even though I was young and kind of impulsive, I knew the value of not burning bridges. I also knew I was quitting 6 weeks shy of vesting in my pension program but when you are 26 years old, pensions don't carry any significance so there was no way I was giving one more holiday season to those ^&*@#!

    Probably 5 years later, I got a letter stating I would be getting around $200/month as a pension from this employer when I reach retirement age in spite of coming in just short of vesting. I know it's not much, but it's about $200 more a month than I expected. Maybe I can buy a couple dinners a month in 20 something years if someone hasn't plundered that pension fund.
    anotherone, llg, and Altra like this.
  8. 1
    Quote from TiffyRN
    Probably 5 years later, I got a letter stating I would be getting around $200/month as a pension from this employer when I reach retirement age in spite of coming in just short of vesting. I know it's not much, but it's about $200 more a month than I expected. Maybe I can buy a couple dinners a month in 20 something years if someone hasn't plundered that pension fund.
    I agree with your post. And about that $200 per month.... It might cover the co-pay of that drug you may need to prolong your life &/or maintain a higher quality of life. It adds up to $2400 per year ... that's $24,000 over 10 years. If you collect that pension for 20 years before you die, that's $48,000 PLUS the interest you can earn if you invest that money. In total, that little pension could actually net you an extra $75,000 invested over the course of your retirement. You might need that money in the last year of your life -- or appreciate being able to leave it to your heirs.
    Altra likes this.
  9. 2
    Quote from NRSKarenRN
    Four weeks professional standard for many RN positions as = # weeks vacation/year.
    So if I'm only getting 2 weeks of vacation, 2 weeks of notice should be sufficient.
    SweettartRN and anotherone like this.
  10. 5
    I find it ironic that we are expected to be "professional" when we aren't treated as "professionals" , and are nothing more than waitresses/waiters with medical knowledge. Not too far from the fry guy if you ask me , lol


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