leaving my job gave a 2 weeks manager very rude. - page 4

by purpleRN6163 15,959 Views | 73 Comments

I am an RN and just got hired onto a new facility. I have been driving 50 miles one way to work and wanted to find a hospital to work at closer to my home, which I did. I turned in my notice I asked for my last shift to be 1 week... Read More


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    Its tough but my advice would be to work the extra shift, its more money in your pocket. Besides do you want to give that NM more ammo to fire at you.
    Dont burn bridges even if you see the smoke.
    JulieL likes this.
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    Nursing is a small world. The CNA you ticked off by leaving the unit short handed so that her assignment for Christmas was unmanageable may be your boss is 15 years. That probably won't be a pleasant working relationship. If you leave without adequate notice and become labeled a "Do not hire," what happens when you want to work at the hospital closer to your new home and they're owned by the same company? I don't understand why you don't just behave professionally about it all. As far as the manager -- I don't blame her for being less than happy about the employee of less than one year who up and leaves right before the holidays with less than adequate notice.

    The OP is the one at fault here; I feel sorry for the manager.
    redhead_NURSE98!, Seas, llg, and 1 other like this.
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    Quote from jcwaters78
    I am an RN and just got hired onto a new facility. I have been driving 50 miles one way to work and wanted to find a hospital to work at closer to my home, which I did. I turned in my notice I asked for my last shift to be 1 week and 6 days from then (6 full 12 hour shifts). Well, my manager wanted to have a meeting with me this past week and it was very uncomfortable for me. All she said was how disappointed she was in me for leaving the company. She had nothing nice to say to me at all, no thank you or you've done a good job or good luck in the future.

    Nothing!! When she asked me why I was resigning, in the middle of me explaining why, she cut me off. I pretty much had no talk time or say in this meeting. Well at the end of it she guilt tripped me into working an extra day. After I got home and everything sank in, Iím extremely mad for agreeing to work that extra shift, especially after the way she treated me. I start my new job the week after thanksgiving and I still have a lot to do before the holiday so that I can be prepared to start that next Monday. The only free days I have to do these things is this Friday, and what would have been a day off next Tuesday, but now I have agreed to work. I donít think it will all get done in one day.

    What should I do? Tell her I canít work? Will this hurt me in the future, she is already really mad and I doubt that she would ever give me a good reference. I NEVER plan to work for this hospital again, and since I was there for less than a year I forfeit my paid time off to be cashed out. HELP!!! Advice needed.
    First, you didn't give two weeks notice. You have one week and six days.

    Second, you should have given four weeks notice -- that's the professional thing to do.

    Third, that meeting with your boss SHOULD have been uncomfortable for you. YOU have been rude and unprofessional by leaving in the midst of the holidays with less than adequate notice. Why would you expect your manager to have anything nice to say to you?

    Fourth, YOU have treated your manager miserably. So your indignation about her not heaping praise upon you and "guilt tripping" you into working an extra day is not only misplaced, it's inappropriate.

    Fifth, it's not the manager's problem whether you still have a lot to do before the holiday. YOU have just created enormous problems for HER by leaving with inadequate notice during the holidays. YOU have created problems for the entire staff. Suck it up and work the day with good grace.

    Sixth, just because you don't like the advice you get does not mean it is wrong.

    Seventh, Consider that even if you don't work for this hospital again, you may find yourself working for this manager again. Or for one of the co-workers you left in the lurch at Christmas. This WILL come back and bite you.
    chare, elkpark, BlueDevil,DNP, and 3 others like this.
  4. 0
    Nursing Professionals at the time of hire and orientation should review the employers policy on resignation/termination.

    Many facilites have requirement that you need to give notice = to amount vacation accrued. Many RN's accrue 3 weeks/first year, thus 3 weeks notice needed. Managers receive 4 weeks vacation --thus need to give 4 weeks notice. Director level may need to give 2-3 months notice.

    As a department head and key staff, I'm required to have a cession plan in place and groom my replacment: 3-4 months notice needed.
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    Hi SweettartRN, When you handed in your resignation without notice, did you find it difficult to obtain another position elsewhere? I live in an at will state also. Once in my life I resigned without notice and had a very difficult time to get hired at another facility. Just curious. Have a great day!
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    Review your company's employee manual regarding resignations/ amount of notice and policy regarding REHIRING former employees. I have worked for several companies whose policy was NOT to rehire. So EVERYONE who left was a DO NOT REHIRE. That being said you want to leave on a good note because as was said ealier by other posters if you remain in the same geographic area you will eventually work with some of these people again somewhere else, either as a co-worker or as a subordinate. If your company does have a general "Not for rehire" policy mention that on your future applications or interviews.
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    Have to agree with the majority of the posters here. Even though some may complain that it shouldn't be the employers that hold all the cards in the "employment at will" game, the reality is that they do, at least in the current job market. Do I think it's fair? Not really. But that is the reality.

    Nursing is a very small world, and you never know who you will be working for/with in the future, or if you ever have to reapply to this hospital or its sister facilities. Also, word of mouth spreads fast, and you'd be surprised who talks to who and where: you may find your reputation preceeding you. Last, in verification checks, employers aren't limited to only providing dates of employment and rehire status, but they may say anything they like about you provided that the information is factual/true. So they can legally disclose that you are a DNR because you didn't give the required notice.

    Don't know how you can fix this from here. But definitely take away this lesson for the future.

    Best of luck whatever happens.
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    I'll add this. Make sure that when you give proper notice it is FIRST in an email cc'd to HR and back to you. Don't think it better to have "the talk" first out of being professional - SEND THE EMAIL FIRST. Talk is cheap, and these days too many people try to say stuff did not happen. Keep a trail, save the trail electronically, as well as a hard copy!!!! If you get a response to your email, reply by chain to your last and quote the previous words by the sender.

    Chains are good.
    BrandonLPN, JulieL, Meriwhen, and 1 other like this.
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    Quote from Starr1966
    Hi SweettartRN, When you handed in your resignation without notice, did you find it difficult to obtain another position elsewhere? I live in an at will state also. Once in my life I resigned without notice and had a very difficult time to get hired at another facility. Just curious. Have a great day!
    I have had no issues getting hired elsewhere, and I haven't given a notice in 8 years.
  10. 3
    Quote from SweettartRN
    I have had no issues getting hired elsewhere, and I haven't given a notice in 8 years.
    I have read all the replies in this topic. Your replies are the only ones that make me wow. What are you exactly defending? Just walking out of door with no notice is plain out rude, unprofessional and possibly a regret for the employer who chose to hire you. Honey, there is nothing to defend about leaving with no notice. You are on the wrong track. And it is ironic that YOU are talking about ethics, and morals. lol. Seriously?
    rngolfer53, Altra, and redhead_NURSE98! like this.


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