leaving my job gave a 2 weeks manager very rude. - page 2

I am an RN and just got hired onto a new facility. I have been driving 50 miles one way to work and wanted to find a hospital to work at closer to my home, which I did. I turned in my notice I asked... Read More

  1. Visit  Ntheboat2 profile page
    0
    Just go to work! Trust me...from experience...it's just one day and what you'll have to deal with/worry about by missing is just not worth it!
  2. Visit  brillohead profile page
    4
    You may be an "at-will" employee, but I would never quit any job without giving adequate notice unless there were serious issues (patient abuse, unsafe working conditions, etc.).

    If the notice you ended up giving was only 13 days, that is really not quite two weeks' notice -- if you at all can, I would work the extra day.

    Another thing you can try is offering to go PRN for a couple shifts/month until they get your position filled -- that can show your willingness to help them out, even though you're not obligated to.

    And the way companies are merging and as mobile as the nursing profession is, I wouldn't want to burn bridges at ANY facility. The next place you apply to may have merged with the old employer at some point, so they have full access to your HR records, or there might be a day when the unit manager you're applying to is someone who used to work at the old place and remembers you.

    Never burn any bridges unless you are certain you're going to win the lottery and never need a job again....
    redhead_NURSE98!, llg, Meriwhen, and 1 other like this.
  3. Visit  SweettartRN profile page
    1
    Don't be surprised if they decide to walk you out the front door in the next two weeks.

    Again, at will employment is not set up to ONLY benefit the employer.
    biggirl11 likes this.
  4. Visit  Sun0408 profile page
    1
    Always give proper notice. I do say "don't burn bridges" why because nursing is a small world. You old NM may be your new one in a new facility. Hospitals do buy others facilities and you will be deemed "not eligible for rehire" for any of them.. As an example...HCA is a huge company with hospitals all over, if you become "not eligible for rehire" in one of their facilities, you will not be hired in any. My current hospital has locations/sister hospitals in several other counties, if I burn one, I burn them all.. Not a good thing..
    brandy1017 likes this.
  5. Visit  SweettartRN profile page
    5
    I'm sorry but even if you give two weeks notice, you are not "guaranteed" a good reference from a place. If someone is ticked off that you're leaving, they can do whatever they want to you. Even if you've performed amazingly. I've seen it happen before. Two weeks notice, or any kind of notice, is dated, old-fashioned, and may actually hurt you in the long run. If they walk you out they can say you were terminated.

    The employer does not extend a two week notice when they ask you to leave. Why should the expectation be any different from an employee?
  6. Visit  brillohead profile page
    5
    Quote from SweettartRN
    I'm sorry but even if you give two weeks notice, you are not "guaranteed" a good reference from a place. If someone is ticked off that you're leaving, they can do whatever they want to you. Even if you've performed amazingly. I've seen it happen before. Two weeks notice, or any kind of notice, is dated, old-fashioned, and may actually hurt you in the long run. If they walk you out they can say you were terminated.

    The employer does not extend a two week notice when they ask you to leave. Why should the expectation be any different from an employee?
    Because it's the decent thing to do.
    It's the professional thing to do.
    It's the ethical thing to do.

    If you don't want to give notice, that's fine -- more jobs available for the rest of us!
    Altra, elkpark, Meriwhen, and 2 others like this.
  7. Visit  Sun0408 profile page
    1
    Quote from SweettartRN
    I'm sorry but even if you give two weeks notice, you are not "guaranteed" a good reference from a place. If someone is ticked off that you're leaving, they can do whatever they want to you. Even if you've performed amazingly. I've seen it happen before. Two weeks notice, or any kind of notice, is dated, old-fashioned, and may actually hurt you in the long run. If they walk you out they can say you were terminated.

    The employer does not extend a two week notice when they ask you to leave. Why should the expectation be any different from an employee?
    Two weeks notice will land you in the "do not hire list" fast depending on the policy. We are required to give 4 weeks notice. This is at my current facility as well as my last. Both are very large hospitals. Also, no one said you would get a good reference from the previous employer after placing proper notice. Once you leave a company, the new company usually calls to verify your dates of employment and if you are eligible for rehire; a yes is a good sign to the new employer.
    Meriwhen likes this.
  8. Visit  catlover314 profile page
    2
    My facility's HR doesn't let mgrs give detailed references. All you'll get is "not eligible for rehire" as a reference. Not worth it for one day more at a job. Agree with Brillohead:

    Because it's the decent thing to do.
    It's the professional thing to do.
    It's the ethical thing to do.
    Nascar nurse and Pepper The Cat like this.
  9. Visit  Nascar nurse profile page
    3
    Quote from SweettartRN
    Two weeks notice, or any kind of notice, is dated, old-fashioned, and may actually hurt you in the long run. If they walk you out they can say you were terminated.

    The employer does not extend a two week notice when they ask you to leave. Why should the expectation be any different from an employee?
    Dated and old fashioned? Hurt in the long run? Care to share what you mean by this? What about the patients that are expecting quality care? What about your coworkers that are stuck pulling extra shifts or working short?

    The nursing community is generally pretty small - everyone knows someone who knows someone. Not sure how long you've been in the business but I'd bet money you're not making a good reputation for yourself with this attitude.
    Altra, llg, and Meriwhen like this.
  10. Visit  Ntheboat2 profile page
    2
    Quote from SweettartRN
    I'm sorry but even if you give two weeks notice, you are not "guaranteed" a good reference from a place. If someone is ticked off that you're leaving, they can do whatever they want to you. Even if you've performed amazingly. I've seen it happen before. Two weeks notice, or any kind of notice, is dated, old-fashioned, and may actually hurt you in the long run. If they walk you out they can say you were terminated.

    The employer does not extend a two week notice when they ask you to leave. Why should the expectation be any different from an employee?
    I agree with you that since employers get to benefit from the "at will. we don't have to give a notice and can fire you for any reason or no reason at all" then we should get to as well! Unfortunately, it doesn't work that way. I learned the hard way. After skipping out on ONE SHIFT (much like the OP is describing...the last shift of a 2 week notice) I was put on the "do not hire" list. It didn't matter that i had never, ever been in trouble for anything, never had any warning, or that I had great reviews. That ONE shift landed me on the do not hire list for the company that practically owns healthcare within hundreds of miles. I was lucky that after appealing the decision the person in charge at HR changed my status. Most people aren't that fortunate and they have to either worry that future employers are going to be told they are no rehire OR not put them down on their application and risk being found out as a liar. Not to mention, if you don't put it down then you don't get credit for all that experience. Either way, it's just a sucky situation. Even being the rebel that I like to think I am (lol) it was a big mistake and I'd recommend to anyone to just suck it up and finish out every single last day!
    NRSKarenRN and llg like this.
  11. Visit  jeannepaul profile page
    2
    I worked for a home hospice company for 6 years. Rarely called in, worked almost every day and many months was working 24/7 both as case manager and on call. I gave at least 3 weeks notice. The day BEFORE my last day of work, I decided to go ahead and turn in all of my stuff so I didn't have to drive into town my last day as I had no patients to see.

    I hung around the office for about 1.5h waiting until the office manager was free, not to mention worked the entire previous weekend with a key to the office. After I turned in my stuff, I left and saw the general manager and said goodbye, she gave me a hug and asked for my business card as I am also a REALTOR. I went to my car and when I went back in to give it to her, the office manager came out and started following me around.

    I asked her what she wanted and she told me the DON, who just 10min ago also was giving me a hug, wanted her to escort me out the door. I was shocked, well I proceded to walk down the hall to find the general manager but she wasn't in her office so I asked one of the team leaders to give her my card.

    I was fuming when I got to my car, after 6 years of being so loyal to this company, this was the thanks I got. I still had my work email on my personal blackberry so i did an all email to the entire company telling them goodbye and said sorry I didn't get to tell everyone goddby but the DON HAD ME ESCORTED OUT THE DOOR!!! My email was off within 15min. At least everyone was able to see what loyalty got ya.
    biggirl11 and SweettartRN like this.
  12. Visit  threebrats46 profile page
    1
    Do what is right for you. It's not professional of her to be "mean" as well. Dont take it personal.
    I worked my last day for my coworkers because I was close to them honestly.
    SweettartRN likes this.
  13. Visit  amygarside profile page
    2
    I think it would just better if you would be the better person. Finish all the task that needed to be done, then move on to your new job. At least she would not be able to say that you reneged on your promise.
    SweettartRN and llg like this.

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