leaving my job gave a 2 weeks manager very rude. - page 2

by purpleRN6163 | 16,292 Views | 73 Comments

I am an RN and just got hired onto a new facility. I have been driving 50 miles one way to work and wanted to find a hospital to work at closer to my home, which I did. I turned in my notice I asked for my last shift to be 1 week... Read More


  1. 1
    Ugh, the hospital that I will be free from in 1 day (!!) requires 30 days notice from professional employees, and requires that you work your last scheduled shift in order to be eligible for rehire. And I second all the comments about not burning bridges. In my case, the employer owns all the hospitals in a 3 county area. That's a lot of bridges to light up.
    llg likes this.
  2. 3
    I understand that we all do what we need to do, but I imagine that your boss was disappointed and (unpleasantly) surprised to have you quit during the holiday season with barely two weeks notice, particularly when you've been there less than a year. While she obviously could have been more professional and not let emotion control the meeting she had with you, I wouldn't expect someone to give you praise if you're leaving with little notice at an inopportune time. JMO.

    I would work the time you've agreed to and leave with your reference intact. Rather than the personal reference from your boss, I would be more concerned that HR would verify your eligibility for rehire, which you may lose if you renege on what you've agreed to do. When I left my last job, I made a new schedule for the month and turned in my notice that it would be my last schedule (30 days notice, by their policy), the day it was confirmed and posted. I do like the idea above where you use the last two weeks as PTO though - never thought of that!
    elkpark, nrsang97, and llg like this.
  3. 3
    Wait until an hour before the shift and call in. That'll show her.
  4. 0
    Just go to work! Trust me...from experience...it's just one day and what you'll have to deal with/worry about by missing is just not worth it!
  5. 4
    You may be an "at-will" employee, but I would never quit any job without giving adequate notice unless there were serious issues (patient abuse, unsafe working conditions, etc.).

    If the notice you ended up giving was only 13 days, that is really not quite two weeks' notice -- if you at all can, I would work the extra day.

    Another thing you can try is offering to go PRN for a couple shifts/month until they get your position filled -- that can show your willingness to help them out, even though you're not obligated to.

    And the way companies are merging and as mobile as the nursing profession is, I wouldn't want to burn bridges at ANY facility. The next place you apply to may have merged with the old employer at some point, so they have full access to your HR records, or there might be a day when the unit manager you're applying to is someone who used to work at the old place and remembers you.

    Never burn any bridges unless you are certain you're going to win the lottery and never need a job again....
    redhead_NURSE98!, llg, Meriwhen, and 1 other like this.
  6. 1
    Don't be surprised if they decide to walk you out the front door in the next two weeks.

    Again, at will employment is not set up to ONLY benefit the employer.
    biggirl11 likes this.
  7. 1
    Always give proper notice. I do say "don't burn bridges" why because nursing is a small world. You old NM may be your new one in a new facility. Hospitals do buy others facilities and you will be deemed "not eligible for rehire" for any of them.. As an example...HCA is a huge company with hospitals all over, if you become "not eligible for rehire" in one of their facilities, you will not be hired in any. My current hospital has locations/sister hospitals in several other counties, if I burn one, I burn them all.. Not a good thing..
    brandy1017 likes this.
  8. 5
    I'm sorry but even if you give two weeks notice, you are not "guaranteed" a good reference from a place. If someone is ticked off that you're leaving, they can do whatever they want to you. Even if you've performed amazingly. I've seen it happen before. Two weeks notice, or any kind of notice, is dated, old-fashioned, and may actually hurt you in the long run. If they walk you out they can say you were terminated.

    The employer does not extend a two week notice when they ask you to leave. Why should the expectation be any different from an employee?
  9. 5
    Quote from SweettartRN
    I'm sorry but even if you give two weeks notice, you are not "guaranteed" a good reference from a place. If someone is ticked off that you're leaving, they can do whatever they want to you. Even if you've performed amazingly. I've seen it happen before. Two weeks notice, or any kind of notice, is dated, old-fashioned, and may actually hurt you in the long run. If they walk you out they can say you were terminated.

    The employer does not extend a two week notice when they ask you to leave. Why should the expectation be any different from an employee?
    Because it's the decent thing to do.
    It's the professional thing to do.
    It's the ethical thing to do.

    If you don't want to give notice, that's fine -- more jobs available for the rest of us!
    Altra, elkpark, Meriwhen, and 2 others like this.
  10. 1
    Quote from SweettartRN
    I'm sorry but even if you give two weeks notice, you are not "guaranteed" a good reference from a place. If someone is ticked off that you're leaving, they can do whatever they want to you. Even if you've performed amazingly. I've seen it happen before. Two weeks notice, or any kind of notice, is dated, old-fashioned, and may actually hurt you in the long run. If they walk you out they can say you were terminated.

    The employer does not extend a two week notice when they ask you to leave. Why should the expectation be any different from an employee?
    Two weeks notice will land you in the "do not hire list" fast depending on the policy. We are required to give 4 weeks notice. This is at my current facility as well as my last. Both are very large hospitals. Also, no one said you would get a good reference from the previous employer after placing proper notice. Once you leave a company, the new company usually calls to verify your dates of employment and if you are eligible for rehire; a yes is a good sign to the new employer.
    Meriwhen likes this.


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