It's Does No Good To Gripe About Nursing

  1. What I'm saying is that nursing is a profession. So, it's full of people who went to college and when you deal with college-type types there's always a lot of rivalry, competition, narcissism, etc. It's like that in all the professions. I have come to learn that part of being a good nurse, one of the tools a nurse must possess, is the ability to remain above and unaffected by the negativity of the workplace. It should be a 3-semester-hour class they teach that you have to pass a clinical in. All professional environments are negative by nature (Law, Medicine, Accounting, Science, Teaching, etc.).

    Because nursing is a profession rather than just a job, you have to be really proactive in your own career. You cannot expect anyone else to help you. They may! But you really can't expect it. So, it does no good to gripe about nursing as a job, because it's not just a job.

    If you need training, you need to go in and get it on your own--maybe even on your own time and dime.

    You need to avoid any confrontations if at all possible, and when not, you really need to be really professional and blameless.

    You cannot burn bridges, so don't set out to expose your supervisors or whistle-blow this or that, or report your colleagues, or anything else.

    If you don't like an organization, resign gracefully and for reasons that are perfectly legitimate and positive. YOU WILL NEED your colleagues and supervisors on applications of all types for the rest of your career.

    ...Now, as I re-enter the nursing profession, let's see if I can take my own advice for once.
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  2. Visit EGspirit profile page

    About EGspirit, RN

    Joined: Dec '17; Posts: 212; Likes: 348

    57 Comments

  3. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from EGspirit
    What I'm saying is that nursing is a profession. So, it's full of people who went to college and when you deal with college-type types there's always a lot of rivalry, competition, narcissism, etc. It's like that in all the professions. I have come to learn that part of being a good nurse, one of the tools a nurse must possess, is the ability to remain above and unaffected by the negativity of the workplace. It should be a 3-semester-hour class they teach that you have to pass a clinical in. All professional environments are negative by nature (Law, Medicine, Accounting, Science, Teaching, etc.).

    Because nursing is a profession rather than just a job, you have to be really proactive in your own career. You cannot expect anyone else to help you. They may! But you really can't expect it. So, it does no good to gripe about nursing as a job, because it's not just a job.

    If you need training, you need to go in and get it on your own--maybe even on your own time and dime.

    You need to avoid any confrontations if at all possible, and when not, you really need to be really professional and blameless.

    You cannot burn bridges, so don't set out to expose your supervisors or whistle-blow this or that, or report your colleagues, or anything else.


    If you don't like an organization, resign gracefully and for reasons that are perfectly legitimate and positive. YOU WILL NEED your colleagues and supervisors on applications of all types for the rest of your career.

    ...Now, as I re-enter the nursing profession, let's see if I can take my own advice for once.
    I cannot imagine the reason for posting this extremely negative post. You're not looking for advice, but I'm offering some anyway: If you meet a jerk on your way to work this morning, you've met a jerk. If everyone you meet narcissistic, negative, competitive, etc. -- maybe it's YOU.
  4. by   oceangirl1234
    Quote from EGspirit
    You cannot burn bridges, so don't set out to expose your supervisors or whistle-blow this or that, or report your colleagues, or anything else.
    I could disagree with many things you said...this post did not sit right with me. In the above statement you made, are you saying that I am not allowed to report or "expose" a colleague/supervisor if they are doing something to harm a patient?
  5. by   pixierose
    I'm not sure where to start with this post.

    I mean, I've been looking at it ... then re-reading....

    Nope. It doesn't sit well with me. It's like you *maybe* tried to set out to write a positive "go get em tiger" thread but instead negative Nancied your way into a dismaying drivel of "huh."

    Like, I will unfortunately "whistle blow" or report colleagues or supervisors if I am 1000% certain, have gone through all the channels and protocol, etc. That's not just being a responsible nurse, that's being a responsible human being if there is harm being caused to a patient (versus keeping it chummy!).

    I also think, if you're going in expecting "rivalry" and "narcissism" that you will indeed find that ... and only that. I'm 10 months in and haven't seen any of that; I've seen only good, hard working team players.
  6. by   rkitty198
    Obviously this post is meant to be snarky, the op isn't trying to be serious people.
  7. by   vanilla bean
    Quote from rkitty198
    Obviously this post is meant to be snarky, the op isn't trying to be serious people.
    Really? It made even less sense to me when I went back and reread it as snark.
  8. by   rkitty198
    Partially in agreement. Sounds like all snark until that last two paragraph/sentences. It's kind of cryptic I will give the OP that.
  9. by   rkitty198
    Quote from vanilla bean
    Really? It made even less sense to me when I went back and reread it as snark.
    Read above. Forgot to quote you in my prior post
  10. by   EGspirit
    I'm not actually trying to be snarky or negative. I believe if you understand the professional environment, you will better be able to navigate it. I wrote this post in response to people who write posts saying things like, "I'm leaving nursing for good!" I think a lot of burn out can be prevented if you just understand the landscape and manage your expectations accordingly. I mean, I've been a nurse for a while, and I've had lots of different jobs as a nurse in that time. And this is the way I have found it to be. Once I understood it, it didn't bother me as much. And to those who say everything is fine, and it's really me who is the problem, well, perhaps. Lacking that insight, however, I am unable to comment on that.
  11. by   EGspirit
    Quote from pixierose
    I'm not sure where to start with this post.

    I mean, I've been looking at it ... then re-reading....

    Nope. It doesn't sit well with me. It's like you *maybe* tried to set out to write a positive "go get em tiger" thread but instead negative Nancied your way into a dismaying drivel of "huh."

    Like, I will unfortunately "whistle blow" or report colleagues or supervisors if I am 1000% certain, have gone through all the channels and protocol, etc. That's not just being a responsible nurse, that's being a responsible human being if there is harm being caused to a patient (versus keeping it chummy!).

    I also think, if you're going in expecting "rivalry" and "narcissism" that you will indeed find that ... and only that. I'm 10 months in and haven't seen any of that; I've seen only good, hard working team players.
    This is perfect: this is exactly what I'm talking about. And your final paragraph is perfect to a tee. First you suggest I'm talking about putting patients in danger (which I'm not, of course not) and that makes me look bad and makes you look "morally" superior, and then in your last paragraph, you give the perfect company line. It's actually awesomely stated.

    My point is that nurses need to realize that's the environment they are going to work in, and they only have one life to give if they fall on their sword; if they react to the subtle sabotage of coworkers, they will look exactly like what their coworkers are trying to paint them as, and if they just stuff the anger and frustration, eventually, they will burn out and quit.

    So, that's why I said below that it's better to know the rules and the lay of the land. And it's not just nursing; it's worse for doctors; much worse for lawyers. In my opinion.
  12. by   dexilna
    So just accept the status quo, don't ruffle feathers, and leave your opinion/personality at the door? No thank you.
  13. by   EGspirit
    Quote from oceangirl1234
    I could disagree with many things you said...this post did not sit right with me. In the above statement you made, are you saying that I am not allowed to report or "expose" a colleague/supervisor if they are doing something to harm a patient?
    No, of course not. But if you are going to report a colleague or supervisor, or facility for that matter, it better be for something really serious.

    And even then, you may have to realize that you will fall on your sword for doing it. And when all is said and done, all your next job is going to know is that you might report them, that you go behind your bosses back and report him or her, that you think you're better than others, that you will be spying on others, and that you have trouble working as a team.

    Because here's a fact: in any given day at work there will be medication errors, neglectful care, ignorance, failure to call a doctor, doctors who don't call back to give an order, etc., etc., ad nasueum--every single shift. So, what sword are you going to fall on? Because you can only do it once.

    And no, they can't fire a whistleblower, but you will make mistakes--every single shift, I guarantee it. And they will just start looking at them. And that's how they will get rid of you.

    I know this sounds negative, but I really don't see it that way myself. It's definitely Machiavellian, but it's neither negative or positive. It's just the way things are, and nurses burn out all the time for not understanding it. That's all I'm trying to say.
    Last edit by EGspirit on Dec 9, '17 : Reason: GRAMMAR
  14. by   EGspirit
    Quote from dexilna
    So just accept the status quo, don't ruffle feathers, and leave your opinion/personality at the door? No thank you.
    Then what are you going to do? Ruffle feathers by spouting "opinions" and forcing your personality on others? Remember, it's YOU who wants to work with them. It's you who put in the application. If it was the other way around, if you had skills so rare and in demand that they simply had no choice but to do whatever they could to retain you, then you'd be able to ruffle feathers and give your daily opinions without fear of consequence. Without that, what are your choices? Either you will ruffle feathers or you will stifle you desire to do so. Neither is a good option. But what if you just had no desire to ruffle feathers or give your opinion or express your unique personality in the workplace.

    And I'm not talking about giving your opinion when it's part of your job to do so. I'm talking about all the other times in the nurses station when its really just part of the chatter that goes on.

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