is it OK to submit your 2 week notice via email?

  1. 0 I work mostly weekend and my managers are never here on weekends. I want to submit my 2 week notice but I can't do that face to face. Is it considered unprofessional to send an email?
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  3. Visit  sourapril} profile page

    About sourapril, BSN, RN

    sourapril has '1 years 3 months' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'public health'. From 'Denver, CO, US'; Joined Mar '10; Posts: 605; Likes: 185. You can follow sourapril on LinkedIn My Website

    32 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  demylenated} profile page
    8
    Personally, I think yes - unless that has been your sole source of communication. I would make a phone call... Or write a letter and leave it in their mailbox, THEN do a follow-up email.
  5. Visit  canesdukegirl} profile page
    3
    Yes, unprofessional. Send her an email asking for a time during the week that the two of you can meet, and turn in your resignation then. If you have another job during the week, ask for the day off or ask if you can take a few hours off.
    tyvin, melmarie23, and JB2007 like this.
  6. Visit  Ardneth} profile page
    1
    Yes, it is unprofessional. You only need to find 5 minutes during the week to stop by. Turning your resignation letter should just be a quick in and out process, 2-3 minutes. It should be up to your manager to schedule a meeting at a later time to discuss, wrap things up, etc after they've spoken to HR.
    tyvin likes this.
  7. Visit  caroladybelle} profile page
    2
    Quote from sourapril
    I work mostly weekend and my managers are never here on weekends. I want to submit my 2 week notice but I can't do that face to face. Is it considered unprofessional to send an email?
    Let's see:

    How would you feel if someone fired you from your job by email?

    If an interviewer for your preferred position that you were praying for, interviewed you by email, not permitting any give or take interaction?

    If your MD notified you of a life altering illness/condition by email?

    Would you consider that professional?

    I believe that you know the answer.

    The other consideration is will you ever need your manager as a reference EVER in your career?
    mustlovepoodles and caliotter3 like this.
  8. Visit  EmergencyNrse} profile page
    0
    Oh, but it's the new generation that embraces technology. Where all communication should be electronic, right?

    You can certainly fall in line with some of the others here that think it's okay:
    http://allnurses.com/general-nursing...er-574513.html

    My opinion is the same. Tacky! And I'll add unprofessional as well...
    NO! You should not give notice via e-mail.
  9. Visit  Chin up} profile page
    4
    You can do anything you want...but, very unprofessional and does not bode well for your character. I would not give a good reference for you if ever needed. I also would probably not rehire you. Remember, nursing is a small community and eventually we meet up with folks we worked with or know of. Don't start off on the wrong foot. You should be establishing a strong reputation right now. So Please do the right thing. Meet in person, thank them for the opportunity and leave the door open wide, you never know when you may need them.Peace!
  10. Visit  NurseLoveJoy88} profile page
    5
    Quote from caroladybelle
    Let's see:

    How would you feel if someone fired you from your job by email?

    If an interviewer for your preferred position that you were praying for, interviewed you by email, not permitting any give or take interaction?

    If your MD notified you of a life altering illness/condition by email?

    Would you consider that professional?

    I believe that you know the answer.

    The other consideration is will you ever need your manager as a reference EVER in your career?
    LOL. a little overboard me thinks.
  11. Visit  Little Miss Coffee} profile page
    0
    I don't think this sort of thing would ever be professional to do via email.

    Some facilities use email more than others. Sometimes, email is a good method of communication, even professional communication, because of the way that organization does things.

    But this is a decision that will drastically change the place you work. It's not just some quick little relatively unimportant detail, it's a big deal. Definitely find some way to talk to them personally.
  12. Visit  BabyLady} profile page
    0
    Quote from sourapril
    I work mostly weekend and my managers are never here on weekends. I want to submit my 2 week notice but I can't do that face to face. Is it considered unprofessional to send an email?
    It is unprofessional to do it by e-mail.

    Wait until Monday and do it face to face. A couple of days are not going to make any difference.
  13. Visit  mcleanl} profile page
    1
    Quote from EmergencyNrse
    Oh, but it's the new generation that embraces technology. Where all communication should be electronic, right?

    You can certainly fall in line with some of the others here that think it's okay:
    http://allnurses.com/general-nursing...er-574513.html

    My opinion is the same. Tacky! And I'll add unprofessional as well...
    NO! You should not give notice via e-mail.

    I read the above post.....and I think it is totally appropriate to email a thank you. In fact my husband is an executive and every interview he has ever been on a "thank you" has been sent electronically.......you would look out of date sending it in any other format. This is how people communicate now.....

    In terms of a resignation....I think if you work off shift or weekends a call should be made to the manager and it can be followed up with a meeting (if the manager thinks it is necessary) and an email or letter of resignation. People's time is valuable, including a manager's time.....I would put the ball in their court.
    tyvin likes this.
  14. Visit  caroladybelle} profile page
    1
    Oh, really?

    I have several acquaintances that have been fired/laid off by email, sometimes while they were at work. I have one close friend that received a diagnosis of Paget's by email (though admittedly she kept having trouble seeing the MD in question in a timely manner - when time was of the essence). And know several nurses that were email "screened" by prospective employers for staff positions (no, not agency or travelers).

    If the OP is well liked, a valuable staffer or difficult to replace, at very least the resignation of the staffer will be a great inconvenience. The manager will have to fill the spot, get staff to work extra weekends (imagine the griping and whining) and deal with training/orienting someone or often covering. If the OP is not a valued staffer, well this makes them look worse.

    Nursing is a small universe - everyone talks to everyone. While HR may just give out basic data, managers have ways of finding out the treasure and the dirt on prospective employees, and they have long memories.

    In the current economy, it does not pay to act recklessly when resigning.

    If the employer had the good grace to interview you/hire you/pay you, the least you you can do is resign in person. Really, hoe hard is that?
    caliotter3 likes this.
  15. Visit  Mrs. SnowStormRN} profile page
    2
    I agree that it looks unprofessional, I also want to say that a document like this should contain your signature. Much Luck to you!
    caliotter3 and Chin up like this.


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