Irony regarding cellphone use at work - page 2

Our unit got another one of our periodic reminders to quit looking at our phones at work. So, my last shift I made a concerted effort to comply. Yes, I'm as guilty as the whippersnappers! What do... Read More

  1. by   ~♪♫ in my ♥~
    What's silly to me about these rules is that I carry a large number of clinical and language references on my phone. I use it appropriately and ignore the stupid rule.
  2. by   Been there,done that
    Your facility is lenient. I completely agree with the zero tolerance policy for personal cell phone use while on duty. If you are observed using your PED, security walks you out the door.

    The assistant manager may, or may not have known you were working when the text was sent. You have time to check important messages on your break, and after clocking out.

    There are waaay to many hospital workers goofing off , playing on their phone.
  3. by   Been there,done that
    Quote from KindaBack
    What's silly to me about these rules is that I carry a large number of clinical and language references on my phone. I use it appropriately and ignore the stupid rule.
    It won't be a stupid rule if it gets you canned.
    The facility provides you with all the reference material you need. Put the stupid phone down.
  4. by   Irish_Mist
    I carry my phone with me as there is no specific rule on our unit against doing so. My nurse manager doesn't mind as long as people aren't constantly on their phone texting, playing candy crush, etc especially in front of visitors and patients. It does project a bad image. I keep my phone handy for when I need to make a quick calculation, look up a med (I like my skyscape app more than Lexicomp), and set myself some reminders to keep on top of things. Banning cell phones all together punishes everyone rather than the true culprits who just play on their phone all the time.
  5. by   TheMoonisMyLantern
    Quote from Been there,done that
    It won't be a stupid rule if it gets you canned.
    The facility provides you with all the reference material you need. Put the stupid phone down.
    That's a big assumption saying that the facility provides all the reference materials needed.
  6. by   Care&Joy
    That's when you make a meeting with your boss & ask to be reimbursed for 50% of your personal phone bill or give them the option to provide a cell phone for work. Tell them your phone is your personal phone & not for constant work use unless expenses are shared. You have that right to at least have this conversation.
  7. by   marylou5
    OMG. Agree totally!! Use of private cell phones by too many nurses/cnas etc..is horrendous..... not only in plain sight of everyone, but in Pt. rooms, or hiding in Pt bathrooms, or stairwells while patients, MDs are left unattended. Time spent on private telephone calls is stealing time meant for patient care...and that is not what you are being paid for!! As a supervisor, I was forced to warn and ultimately terminate repeat offenders that cell phone use was prohibited on the floors...no excuses. Check your phone on your coffee or lunch break. If there is a REAL Emergency, your family, friends etc can call the hospital and you will get the call. Rules are rules. You are not a focused nurse if your attention is constantly interrupted by your pocket buzzing. Tell your family and friends...don't call me....I'm on duty!!
  8. by   oldpsychnurse
    Quote from Been there,done that
    Your facility is lenient. I completely agree with the zero tolerance policy for personal cell phone use while on duty. If you are observed using your PED, security walks you out the door.

    The assistant manager may, or may not have known you were working when the text was sent. You have time to check important messages on your break, and after clocking out.

    There are waaay to many hospital workers goofing off , playing on their phone.
    Just me, but I don't think anybody should have to check their cell phones for messages from their employer when they're on their break or otherwise off the clock. If it's that important, management should call the nurse on the unit phone.
  9. by   NuGuyNurse2b
    Quote from CrunchRN
    I love irony!
    Except the situation described in the opening post isn't ironic; it's actually hypocrisy.
  10. by   Been there,done that
    Quote from TheMoonisMyLantern
    That's a big assumption saying that the facility provides all the reference materials needed.
    I have worked in at least 10 facilities. One for 14 years, several as agency and traveler with minimal orientation. I never needed to do my own research on my personal electronic device.
    If a had a question RE: meds, I had the pharmacy or Micromedex on the EHR to consult.

    If I had a question regarding disease management, I called the provider.

    If I had a question on policy and procedure, I would call supervision.

    What reference material do YOU think has to be researched on the almighty cell phone?
  11. by   RobbiRN
    I have to weigh in with the apparent minority on this one. My phone stays in my locker while I'm on the clock, and I check it only on break. The hospital bought my time and my patients deserve to have it. I'm mystified how some nurses manage to find so much time at the desk on their phones even on days with the ER is totally overrun. Getting patients to shut theirs off so we can get on with evaluating and treating their emergency is a whole different can of worms... We do have voice activated communicators clipped to out pockets which work throughout the facility, and if anyone really needs to find me, I'm reachable. (There are probably already some great studies on lost productivity due to cellphone abuse.)
  12. by   audreysmagic
    Quote from blondy2061h
    I work house supervision now so have to carry my work cell phone with me at work. When people are busy I try and do what I can to help out with patient care. I don't want to get totally rusty with the hands on stuff! I feel like I need to explain myself all the time to patients when I'm trying to draw blood and my phone is ringing in my pocket the entire time.
    I know that feeling! It's the same for me, as house sup, and I always feel bad when doing an intake assessment and my "leash" starts ringing. Though the patients on the floor actually recognize the phone by its bright blue case. They know who's supervisor by who has "that blue phone" and I'm never sure if that's a good thing or not.
  13. by   foggnm
    LOL. Isn't it funny how well educated nursing professionals (and nursing assistants) aren't allowed to use their phones at work, but the same rules don't apply to the thousands of other people that work in the hospital? I'm not being cynical here, but truly hospital nursing is probably one of the most hyper-controlled jobs I've ever done. Which is why I don't do it any more . I remember working in a large clinic which had several hundred employees of all varieties (MDs, NPs, RNs, LPNs, clerks, xray techs, administrators, etc). And guess who were the only people that wore uniforms? The RNs and LPNs. So this is why we went to college? Of course we should be professional and responsible with our phone use, but banning it during a 12.5 hour shift is silly.
    Last edit by foggnm on Mar 30

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