Instant Gratification - page 4

by jadelpn Guide

8,740 Views | 54 Comments

Indulge me for a moment. Back in the day, nothing was instant but coffee. There was a waiting game for almost every aspect of life. It set people up to have a number of anticipatory feelings. Anticipation is a unusual concept... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from OCNRN63
    I don't really look at these articles as any sort of scholarly piece of writing. I think of them more as op-ed or blog posts. A topic like this would require research. That's why I take them with a grain of salt.
    100% OP-Ed on my end. Anything else and I would certainly quote my source.....
  2. 5
    Quote from jadelpn
    Hey, if I didn't rock the boat, I wouldn't be able to try out my sea legs!
    I had a good laugh at this. Don't forget your life vest (you know you'll need it; sometimes it can get pretty rough on AN).
  3. 4
    I do not think this is an attempt to be critical of any one generation at all. Of course, not everyone fits into their generational stereotype and therefore this does not apply to every person. However, there are some very good points here. My interpretation here is that if we learn to understand each generation - how they were raised, how they think and interpret behavior etc... - it will help a multigenerational team work together cohesively. Each generation may be quite different, bringing unique attributes to a team that encourage a healthy work environment. The examples of how each of these generations were raised provides insight into how they were taught to interact with others, thus, how they may interpret something different. Understanding the generational background of how and/or why certain behaviors exist could provide insight into why someone does something a certain way. This does not make it right or wrong, it simply explains the rationale to someone who was not taught to think that way. Seasoned nurses don't have all the answers, for example with new technology that comes around. However, while a young new nurse may be extremely proficient in technology, he or she does not have the years of nursing experience to apply in the critical thinking process. Working together they can learn from each other and provide quality nursing care. If people would be open to others opinions and thought processes, it can be a win-win for everyone. Different is not right or wrong, it is just different. We should not be afraid of that.
  4. 2
    Quote from Aprile74
    I do not think this is an attempt to be critical of any one generation at all. Of course, not everyone fits into their generational stereotype and therefore this does not apply to every person. However, there are some very good points here. My interpretation here is that if we learn to understand each generation - how they were raised, how they think and interpret behavior etc... - it will help a multigenerational team work together cohesively. Each generation may be quite different, bringing unique attributes to a team that encourage a healthy work environment. The examples of how each of these generations were raised provides insight into how they were taught to interact with others, thus, how they may interpret something different. Understanding the generational background of how and/or why certain behaviors exist could provide insight into why someone does something a certain way. This does not make it right or wrong, it simply explains the rationale to someone who was not taught to think that way. Seasoned nurses don't have all the answers, for example with new technology that comes around. However, while a young new nurse may be extremely proficient in technology, he or she does not have the years of nursing experience to apply in the critical thinking process. Working together they can learn from each other and provide quality nursing care. If people would be open to others opinions and thought processes, it can be a win-win for everyone. Different is not right or wrong, it is just different. We should not be afraid of that.
    Very well put! And could not have explained it better myself!

    In all seriousness, this sums up exactly where I intended this article to perceive. Thank you!
    Aprile74 and Esme12 like this.
  5. 3
    As an older new grad (>45) I have an interesting perspective. I see nurses that are my age that have been nurses for 30 years. Most are wonderful. Some are tired. They need to keep working but they really should stop. I also young nurses who have worked hard, they are caring, confident without being arrogant, and great critical thinkers. Again, there are those that feel entitled.

    I have said this before, I feel uncomfortable when people generalize. There are good and bad in each generation and each person who is in a different stage of life.
  6. 8
    Putting aside the whole new nurse vs old nurse spiel, I think the expectation of instant gratification is a very real phenomenon among younger generations (including myself here). How can it not be?

    It's an inevitable result of the technology and economy around us. I was born in 1980 and the changes I've seen since childhood are astounding.

    Just look at television. When I was a kid, Saturday morning was "cartoon day" because it was the one day that played all the cartoons for the kids who got up early to watch scooby doo and spiderman. That was it for the week. Nowadays, the concept of "Saturday morning cartoons" is meaningless cause a kid can turn on the tv at 2am on a Tuesday and find 5 different 24/7 cartoon channels. Instant gratification. Even something like this has got to have some sort of subliminal effect on kids these days. Instant music and movie download instead of going to the store. Knowing, instantly, what every friend thinks about every mundane minutiae of everyday life via tweets and Facebook. All this has a cumulative effect.

    And even some aspects of this technology that should be good, so often fall short. Here we all are, with literally the sum total of human knowledge and culture a few clicks away, and people are more ignorant of the world around them than they were 50 years ago. We have this amazing tool in the Internet, and it's used mainly to find out what stupid celebrity did what stupid thing.

    Of course all this has an impact on society and on new generations being born into this new reality. How could it not?
  7. 6
    Quote from GrnTea

    I hatehatehate the bazillions of posts I see here with the wailing about having to wait a whole extra DAY for NCLEX results, for people not being able to get the nursing program to pass someone with a below-the-line GPA because it's their passsssssioooonnnn to be nurses and all their friends says what awwwweeessssoommmmme nurses they will be, and how when they get those new grad jobs how mean everyone is to them because they criticize their performance.
    Now now, Grn Tea!
    You are coming dangerously close to our old "Mockery of Nursing" thread here.
    In fact, your comments compelled me to go back and reread it...
    Still hilarious!
    Last edit by Hygiene Queen on Jul 14, '13 : Reason: just noticed I left a word out... and it bothered me
    GrnTea, SoldierNurse22, Nurse_Diane, and 3 others like this.
  8. 1
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    Putting aside the whole new nurse vs old nurse spiel, I think the expectation of instant gratification is a very real phenomenon among younger generations (including myself here). How can it not be?

    It's an inevitable result of the technology and economy around us. I was born in 1980 and the changes I've seen since childhood are astounding.

    Just look at television. When I was a kid, Saturday morning was "cartoon day" because it was the one day that played all the cartoons for the kids who got up early to watch scooby doo and spiderman. That was it for the week. Nowadays, the concept of "Saturday morning cartoons" is meaningless cause a kid can turn on the tv at 2am on a Tuesday and find 5 different 24/7 cartoon channels. Instant gratification. Even something like this has got to have some sort of subliminal effect on kids these days. Instant music and movie download instead of going to the store. Knowing, instantly, what every friend thinks about every mundane minutiae of everyday life via tweets and Facebook. All this has a cumulative effect.

    And even some aspects of this technology that should be good, so often fall short. Here we all are, with literally the sum total of human knowledge and culture a few clicks away, and people are more ignorant of the world around them than they were 50 years ago. We have this amazing tool in the Internet, and it's used mainly to find out what stupid celebrity did what stupid thing.

    Of course all this has an impact on society and on new generations being born into this new reality. How could it not?
    You said exactly what I was thinking while reading this and the replies. How can we expect all generations to stay exactly the same when EVERYTHING is so very different than it was 40 years ago?

    Now, due to technology, instant gratification is a normal everyday occurrence. What do we do, stop technology? No stopping technology is not the answer, but limiting it is. We need to limit our children's television time, internet time, limit fast food, and then let them know what it is like to wait. After all our parents and the older generations are the ones that created this "instant gratification generation" (yes I am stereotyping somewhat like what I feel has been done to us 20 somethings). We all influence what the future generations develop into whether we like to admit it or not.

    Even with limiting technology we are still not going to create clone generations because this world is so very different than it ever was before. This is good thing to me because I don't want to be exactly like the older generations, because they are certainly not perfect. I know the intention was not to make it seem like they are perfect but this thread still does give that interpretation due to certain posts (yes these posts are mainly from the older generation, imagine that).
    DizzyLizzyNurse likes this.
  9. 4
    All I'm saying is that I had to wait 4 months for my board results and we didn't have to talk on the phone 24/7. We left messages and WAITED for a return call. I make my kids WAIT for things to they can learn patience.
    GrnTea, Nurse_Diane, jadelpn, and 1 other like this.
  10. 3
    Quote from Hygiene Queen
    Now now, Grn Tea!
    You are coming dangerously to our old "Mockery of Nursing" thread here.
    In fact, your comments compelled me to go back and reread it...
    Still hilarious!
    Good times, good times...
    GrnTea, Hygiene Queen, and Nurse_Diane like this.


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