Instant Gratification - page 2

by jadelpn Guide

8,291 Unique Views | 54 Comments

Indulge me for a moment. Back in the day, nothing was instant but coffee. There was a waiting game for almost every aspect of life. It set people up to have a number of anticipatory feelings. Anticipation is a unusual concept... Read More


  1. 5
    Nurses of any experience level can be guilty of looking for things to get someone fired; this is not just something that happens with experienced nurses.

    I thought the article had stemmed from the multitudinous threads started by new grads who felt the experienced/older nurses (50+) should be forcibly removed in order to open up jobs for the new grads.
    Altra, VivaLasViejas, Nurse_Diane, and 2 others like this.
  2. 0
    Quote from OCNRN63
    Nurses of any experience level can be guilty of looking for things to get someone fired; this is not just something that happens with experienced nurses.

    I thought the article had stemmed from the multitudinous threads started by new grads who felt the experienced/older nurses (50+) should be forcibly removed in order to open up jobs for the new grads.
    THIS!!! I thought it was a rebuttal/ reverse of the threads, too. I have come to this conclusion--the older nurses can have the jobs; however, do not call me lazy for "sitting around" when I do not have a "real job" because the older nurses have it. I look at as this is the younger peoples' retirement period. When the older nurses retire and the younger ones get nursing jobs, they will work until they die. They will not get retirement later.
  3. 1
    Unless you're wealthy, most people aren't going to get much, if any, retirement.

    Even if you can't find a nursing position, there are still other jobs out there. You may not find what you want, but at least it's a job and income. Of course, that's a personal decision. If you feel you can afford to wait, fine. Maybe you could continue your education; it could give you the edge in an interview.
    Hygiene Queen likes this.
  4. 0
    I applied for an MPH program and didn't get in. To be honest, I am glad I did not as I had no idea how I would pay for it and having loan debt scares the pee out of me. I was also okay with it because I have flirted with the idea of doing an NP program, when I do get some money, but I have no idea about the licensing part if I can get licensing (and prescriptive authority--that's actually the part of licensing that I think I would have a problem with) as I am in HPMP. I am going to ask the BON about it. Even if it was a brutally honest answer of "no, we will not license you." I would prefer to know before ever considering spending the money on a Master's I could not use.

    You know, there was a thread a while back that the guy was a new grad and he couldn't get a nursing job until 3 years out. He was getting so tired of looking for one, that he started looking at the phone company working on power lines I think it was where a family member worked. He was going to just give the nursing thing up, then someone gave him a chance at nursing. I think that gives me a little hope, but the younger new grads (and maybe the older new grads) will become apathetic to finding a nursing job and look at other careers.

    I think I am becoming very apathetic with it; the excitement is starting to really wane.
  5. 0
    Quote from jadelpn
    Newer nurses have always had instant gratification. The thought of waiting is not in their mindset, therefore, the level of frustration goes up when their nursing practice doesn't reflect this concept.
    I have hadn't a chance to read all of the comments but I would like to say that not all "newer nurses" expect instant gratification. There are many "newer nurses" that are in fact not a traditional new nurse age and are much more mature. I know I am 33 and many of the people I graduated with are 30+ with some being 40+ and a few even being 50+. I know it was not your intention to generalize but that did happen with assuming "newer nurses" were of a certain age.
  6. 14
    Honey, I am old enough to be your mother if your parents are in their 50s-60s, and I want to tell you that while it is true that it was very easy for a new grad BSN to get a job in the 70s, as I did, the idea that "things were cheaper" and "school was cheaper" is not necessarily true. My first job as an RN paid me the munificent sum of $697 PER MONTH. My second one got me up to $950.

    I am not slamming Gen Y. Hell, my kids are Gen Y and I am crazy about them; they are hard-working professionals in well-deserved leadership positions, a lot of respect from their peers, and bright futures. I didn't do the "friendship parenting" thing with them; they had to wait for things all the time, and they are both awesome at advance planning, taking personal responsibility for their actions (and errors), and saving for the future. NOW they are my friends. And of course they make the very best grandchildren

    I hatehatehate the bazillions of posts I see here with the wailing about having to wait a whole extra DAY for NCLEX results, for people not being able to get the nursing program to pass someone with a below-the-line GPA because it's their passsssssioooonnnn to be nurses and all their friends says what awwwweeessssoommmmme nurses they will be, and how when they get those new grad jobs how mean everyone is to them because they criticize their performance. For folks who seem to spend a lot of time looking in the mirror they don't seem to have a clue about what they're all about.

    I read an interesting paper about mid-20s folks currently flooding psychology offices with vague disquiet and feelings of incompetence, like they don't know why they don't feel better about themselves. The author, a psychologist, concluded that they had always been "validated" and praised for meeting normal requirements, always been sheltered from failure, always had obstructions removed from their paths, and now they found that they had no experience in overcoming adversity or learning from failure. Thus they felt adrift, at sea, not really sure what to do, and afraid to try. Is this what we have to look forward to caring for us when we are old(er)?
    lorirn58, FMF Corpsman, Altra, and 11 others like this.
  7. 0
    That was not me wailing about NCLEX. I knew mine could take longer than normal, and it did...a couple days longer. I got word from the BON staff themselves because I asked and it was a hold up because of HPMP. I know, not everyone else's circumstances.

    Psychology offices. Yeah, I get that comment. Enough said. I agree with you on that. I actually was not entitled growing up. My parents did the thing where chores were "x" amount of money (say like $.50 for task "x") The more work I did, the more I earned. It was not real money, just if I wanted a toy that cost $10, I earned the money (written on paper, of course) and then when I had enough earned, my mom bought the toy. If I didn't want to do a certain chore (I was not keen on cleaning bathrooms; before anyone says anything, I have PCT exp and have wiped behinds before--I am fine with it. Just because I do not like cleaning toilets does not mean I would suck at nursing), then I could also do worksheets (math, spelling, etc.) for $.10 a page. I ended up excelling in grade school because of it. My mom also took my brother and I to work when she worked as a DON at a nursing home. We had to get the drink orders and pick up trays and such when the residents ate. It helped with the tasks and the elderly people loved us (we were kids then--elementary school age). So, not all 20 somethings got everything given to them.

    I actually see more of that in teens and grade school kids now than I saw it in 20 somethings. I guess it is Generation Z. The kids of Gen. X. Generation Y (and some Gen. X) are kids of Baby Boomers.
  8. 3
    Quote from SingingBird
    How horrible and humiliating to be put down during a staff meeting by a comment like "you all know nothing about waiting." Agism really can happen to all age groups. The frustrations of being a new nurse has happened to all new nurses no matter when the career was started, according to my mentors and friends of various ages. I myself know a lot about waiting. Pulling myself out of homelessness and deciding to work part-time instead of full-time in order to obtain an education is one clear example. I am from the generation that you generalized, but I have gasp *paid my own way in life and my four children's way including paying for education. If any one tries to tell me in a professional meeting that I know nothing about waiting, they are going to get a lesson that day. What a judgmental article written to give praise to yourself. Let your work bring you praise.
    How humbling. Thank you for pointing this out to me. Not my intent in the least, however, I can see how you would take it that way.

    I have been a nurse a long time, and always learning.
  9. 1
    You said "Newer nurses have always had instant gratification. The thought of waiting is not in their mindset, therefore, the level of frustration goes up when their nursing practice doesn't reflect this concept." How dare you generalized a group like that?! You obviously don't know how to refer to people in general. I'm an immigrant in the US, worked for 10 years to save money to start nursing school, paid my own way through nursing school, and thanks to God's mercy I'm a RN now. I know what waiting is, so for you to just write this stuff is very disrespectful to say the least. You need to use words like "most nurses" or "some nurses". I'm trying to understand why you posted this kind of comment... Next time be more careful.
    DizzyLizzyNurse likes this.
  10. 3
    Quote from GrnTea
    Honey, I am old enough to be your mother if your parents are in their 50s-60s, and I want to tell you that while it is true that it was very easy for a new grad BSN to get a job in the 70s, as I did, the idea that "things were cheaper" and "school was cheaper" is not necessarily true. My first job as an RN paid me the munificent sum of $697 PER MONTH. My second one got me up to $950.

    I am not slamming Gen Y. Hell, my kids are Gen Y and I am crazy about them; they are hard-working professionals in well-deserved leadership positions, a lot of respect from their peers, and bright futures. I didn't do the "friendship parenting" thing with them; they had to wait for things all the time, and they are both awesome at advance planning, taking personal responsibility for their actions (and errors), and saving for the future. NOW they are my friends. And of course they make the very best grandchildren

    I hatehatehate the bazillions of posts I see here with the wailing about having to wait a whole extra DAY for NCLEX results, for people not being able to get the nursing program to pass someone with a below-the-line GPA because it's their passsssssioooonnnn to be nurses and all their friends says what awwwweeessssoommmmme nurses they will be, and how when they get those new grad jobs how mean everyone is to them because they criticize their performance. For folks who seem to spend a lot of time looking in the mirror they don't seem to have a clue about what they're all about.

    I read an interesting paper about mid-20s folks currently flooding psychology offices with vague disquiet and feelings of incompetence, like they don't know why they don't feel better about themselves. The author, a psychologist, concluded that they had always been "validated" and praised for meeting normal requirements, always been sheltered from failure, always had obstructions removed from their paths, and now they found that they had no experience in overcoming adversity or learning from failure. Thus they felt adrift, at sea, not really sure what to do, and afraid to try. Is this what we have to look forward to caring for us when we are old(er)?
    I agree with your post GrnTea...thanks for being in the corner of Gen Y

    As for those 20 something's, a few may have been raised with "helicopter" parenting...the attachment disorder kids. Just a thought.


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