If you think you need to call the MD, CALL THE MD!!!! - page 7

Decisions to call the MD need to be made on the basis of, "Does the MD need to be aware at this time. Does the patient need interventions that are not ordered? Tests that are not ordered?" And... Read More

  1. Visit  suanna profile page
    1
    If this has been covered- please excuse me- (didn't read through all the posts). If you decide you do or do not need to call the doctor- It's YOUR decision. If you ask me if you should, and I say yes/no or I don't know- I don't expect to be quoted when the doctor starts growling about being called. Dealing with grumpy docs is part of the job- do it. Don't point the finger at me just because you asked for my input before making YOUR decision and don't like the way you are being treated when you made it. I'm not the one treating you that way- the doc is. If you decide not to call on my advice, and the doc throws a hissy- YOU ARE STILL THE ONE WHO DIDN'T CALL. I can tell you what I would do and why, but you know the patient best and are in the position to make this decision. Don't drag me into it or the only answer you will ever get from my is "I don't know, I guess you'll have to call" or "ask the supervisor if it isn't covered in the policy book". Sometimes you are going to get grumped at if you call AND/OR if you don't-there is no answer that isn't going to end up getting your head bit off. It is just a matter of when you want to put up with it and what the patients needs are.
    Altra likes this.
  2. Visit  weirdscience profile page
    2
    I get the whole "have your ducks in a row before you call" thing, I REALLY do. But one thing that needs to be understood is that when you're a med/surg nurse with a 5 or 6 (or more) patient load, it's not always possible.

    For instance: the phone rings and it's the doc, you have to grab it no matter whose room you're in or what you're doing because you might miss them, and you're calling to report, say, a fever and coarse lungs on a neutropenic patient, you might have looked to see if they've had blood cultures drawn, but you might not know if they were swabbed for flu and strep this admission. And furthermore, you AREN'T always in a good place to look at the chart or computer quickly. Believe me, I would love to have the chart open in front of me with zero distractions when the doctor calls me back, but unfortunately I have to keep moving.
    CrazyGoonRN and wooh like this.
  3. Visit  SionainnRN profile page
    1
    Quote from weirdscience
    I get the whole "have your ducks in a row before you call" thing, I REALLY do. But one thing that needs to be understood is that when you're a med/surg nurse with a 5 or 6 (or more) patient load, it's not always possible. For instance: the phone rings and it's the doc, you have to grab it no matter whose room you're in or what you're doing because you might miss them, and you're calling to report, say, a fever and coarse lungs on a neutropenic patient, you might have looked to see if they've had blood cultures drawn, but you might not know if they were swabbed for flu and strep this admission. And furthermore, you AREN'T always in a good place to look at the chart or computer quickly. Believe me, I would love to have the chart open in front of me with zero distractions when the doctor calls me back, but unfortunately I have to keep moving.
    But part of having your ducks in a row would be to print out the SBAR and jot down the pertinent tests BEFORE calling the doc. That way when they call back you have that paper in hand to use till you can get to the computer.

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com
    Ruby Vee likes this.

Need Help Searching For Someone's Comment? Enter your keywords in the box below and we will display any comment that matches your keywords.



Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top
close
close