I can't give report to this nurse anymore !! - page 2

Hi everyone ! So this may come across as ranting but I am fed up with a nurse I have had to give report to recently and I need some advice! So I work in an icu and I have been off orientation for... Read More

  1. by   sallyrnrrt
    Set your boundaries " I'm giving you my report, now!"

    So sorry you are going thru this
  2. by   chacha82
    This is one of the rare cases where I'm all for going to the manager. Her habits are costing them $$$. Is she this way with everyone or just new nurses? I can't stand it when the oncoming nurse wants to do an assessment or have a twenty minute conversation at the bedside, especially if I have to be back in the morning.
  3. by   Been there,done that
    "Everybody fights over who has to give report to her and I always lose because I'm new . "

    You have to give report on the nurse that follows you. Are you saying the assignment is manipulated?
  4. by   KatieMI
    Get together and go to have a breakfast or coffee right after your shift. The more nurses join, the better. Then the "slow report taker" will get a lesson or two from her own circle.

    I did it that way when I was in agency. Instant solution of the problem for the price of 6 coffees and a plate of pastries , plus I got a few new pals as well and we all had a great time!
  5. by   SummitRN
    Given that nobody approves of her style... I recommend that you make this thoroughly entertaining for yourself.

    Rule #1 Be ready to overcome any objection, deflection, interruption, or other attempt to shut you down. You are in the right so she has no power except what you grant when she tries to dominate.

    1. When she arrives start giving your report. If she says wait or no, explain time s valuable, she can do what she wants, but you are giving the report. And keep talking.
    2. If she walks into the room, say "oh at the bedside is fine! Follow and keep talking.
    3. If she tries to interrupt, say anything say all question can wait until he end and keep talking over her even if she continues to talk.
    4. When she totally loses her cool, ask her if she would like to bring the manager into this... I guarantee she won't, so when she pauses, KEEP TALKING. She has to know she'll get shot down, or if she doesn't... let her discover... more entertainment.
    5. If she tries to distract with room details or chart details keep repeating "that can wait until the the end."
    6. When you reach the end, answer any legitimate questions, but ignore sniping and nitpicking. Say "my report is complete, and that discussion is unnecessary."
    7. If she will not leave your first patient's room in order to prevent you from reporting on the second patient, in front of the patient (in a calm professional tone), progressively press her:
    *"I am ready to report on the next patient"
    *"Any of your shift activities can wait until after report."
    *"Are you refusing to accept report?"
    *"I do not have to wait... you can do your regular job during your shift not during report.
    *"Would you like me to bring the manager into this?"
    8. Give your second report
    9. Turn on your heels, and leave... grinning.

    Easier said than done, but totally accomplishable. Practice it in your head a few times.

    You'll have tamed the shrew, and you'll be a hero among your colleagues.
    Last edit by SummitRN on Sep 26
  6. by   DesiDani
    People like that have probably got dinged for something in the past. I wouldn't be surprise if a disciplinary action is on her on her license.
  7. by   klone
    I agree with the poster who said that she couldn't be like this if the other nurses didn't enable her to do so. In addition to being a lot more assertive in how you give report (and not allowing her to interrupt) I would also talk to your manager about this.
  8. by   Here.I.Stand
    Oh heck no...and why in the world has this been allowed to continue?? Does the hospital enjoy paying incremental OT? And why does everyone else agree to extend their shift by an HOUR??

    As others have said, begin report early enough to clock out on time. Don't ask her permission -- TELL her that your shift ends in x minutes, and that is how many minutes she has. If she chooses to argue, remind her that her protests are eating into her x minutes.

    Then, begin report.
  9. by   DesiDani
    I have to play devil's advocate for a second. When something goes wrong mgt will be first ask "well did you check it during your report?" So perhaps that happened to her? She may be overdoing it, but there has to be reason why.
  10. by   JKL33
    Quote from DesiDani
    I have to play devil's advocate for a second. When something goes wrong mgt will be first ask "well did you check it during your report?" So perhaps that happened to her? She may be overdoing it, but there has to be reason why.
    If she is so traumatized by being scolded or disciplined for some such incident in the past that she needs to conduct report in this manner, she needs to speak to her manager and undertake efforts to get past it. This is widely out of the norm for even the more particular nurses out there.

    This is a control behavior, and also possibly a matter of self esteem (people who only feel decent about themselves by picking apart what they see as others' shortcomings).
  11. by   DesiDani
    You
    True, but you know she is following a "good in theory, not in practice policy" that mgt has. So how is she going to say "I'm traumatized that I'm zeaolously following a rule that that you set and want everyone to follow"?

    Hey OP? How is the mgt at your job? Do the CN and DON foster a negative atmosphere between nurses and shifts?
  12. by   JKL33
    Quote from DesiDani
    You
    True, but you know she is following a "good in theory, not in practice policy" that mgt has. So how is she going to say "I'm traumatized that I'm zeaolously following a rule that that you set and want everyone to follow"?

    Hey OP? How is the mgt at your job? Do the CN and DON foster a negative atmosphere between nurses and shifts?
    I understand what you're saying and have some 'devil's advocate' tendencies myself. I suppose I just don't think that's really the issue in this particular case, as told. There are a lot of "us" (raising hand...) who can be particular - - but we're just looking to make sure things are "copacetic," not trying to find fault - two very different things.
  13. by   jdub6
    While I think giving her a taste of her own medicine is hilarious I'm not sure its what I would do. Especially If she is annoying but your current relationship isn't outwardly adversarial. If you know in advance she is following you, start writing your report (the parts that aren't in the computer.) Maybe print lab results/orders/etc. That way when you power through her questions and she asks something you've already answered you can assure her its there for her to read once you're gone.

    What would happen if you told her you can't stay while she reads the whole chart but she can text with questions only you can answer (no identifying pt info of course). It takes you x minutes to drive and you'll be up for x minutes after that (i suggest giving her no more than a 15-30min window.) This takes effort from her, could force her to consolidate her questions instead of draw them out and she has to check for reply. Many people just won't bother. You'll have to judge if she would or not.

    If your employer has a book or form to fill out explaining unusual payroll changes (left early, stayed late, computer class or whatever) make sure you complete this every time this happens. If they don't have a system like this email whoever does payroll on every occurrence. "I punched out 36 minutes late because the oncoming nurse requested a complete joint review of the chart, joint patient assessment and joint environments rounds." Do not mention her name. If she follows you as often, and keeps you as late, as you say they will figure it out soon enough. Encourage others to do the same.

    If this fails then bring management in. If you want to try to salvage your relationship with this nurse just say "They keep insisting on bedside report and all these double checks and I just can't seem to do it and leave on time so when I spoke with Manager about all my incidental overtime I asked her to observe report to help me do better."

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