How to handle lazy LPN's on the team - page 3

by Nurse ABC

We do team nursing on our floor with an aide, LPN, and RN as the team leader for up to 10 patients. I'm new to this. We have a few LPN's who will ignore call lights and ask other people to take care of some of their work. A lot... Read More


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    statement: I agree with the comment of not showing possession of any coworker, you are a team and pt satisfaction is the ultimate goal.
    question: Most places allow you to assess but based on my knowledge, an lpn is an lpn not liscensed in assessment or such hence the RN and the NCLEX and the degree. (and i know most lpns are capable and some with much experience)this is not to insult any lpnby state board standards lpns are not trained to assess and teach. the rn should always reassess, which yes, some new grads may know less but ultimately the RN is responsible for you and the aides. When push comes to shove its her @#* on the line. I find it is alway a battle of "well, I think I know more" Just work together and do your job and worry about yourself and your patients. Don't waste negative energy on the BS work together and remember why you chose to walk into a facility and take care of another human being.
    FMF Corpsman, Seas, and LTCNS like this.
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    I've been fortunate to work in *some* LTCs where teamwork is understood. Others? Not so much. In the better homes everyone jumps in and "just does it." OTOH, I hear "he/she is not my patient" all too often and that crawls all over me. That is one of my biggest pet peeves. I cannot stand that!
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    In LTC, we LPNs *do*assess each and every shift. It is silly to pretend otherwise. Sometimes I work with no RN and am the only nurse. So OF COURSE I assess. People try to come up with absurd word games like "data gathering" but it is the SAME thing.
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    I work in Canada. Under my own license and insurance. Assessment on my patients be it admission, or discharge is my responsibility.

    The Charge Nurse is the only RN who can delegate to me just as she is the only person who can delegate to an RN.

    I have been Charge Nurse in another facility. In LTC we are the Charge Nurses.

    It's a lousy job and not worth the entire $1.25 responsibility pay.
    itsmejuli and joanna73 like this.
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    My problem is when they are not doing their job and I'm the one ultimately held responsible if my patients don't get their meds, dressing changes, bed baths, or whatever they're supposed to have from anyone. It all falls on me.
    OP, I can honestly believe you didn't mean to start any LPN vs. RN vs. CNA....just an off wording, we've all done that before.

    No matter what it came down to, it was simply all about how to delegate properly and be assertive. If it was another fellow RN would it be any less annoying, I doubt it?

    Leadership 101 (which by the way seemed easier on paper, then putting into practice lol!) stated we are all responsible for each task we delegate and it is our duty as the "delegator" to follow up...and I'm sure it sucks beyond belief to realize it's not done , but in the end it needs to be done no matter what.

    But if it continues I would absolutely say something to the nurse manager that type of poor team work should not be tolerated

    I will be starting in LTC, and each shift the LPN is the charge, this will be my first charge role but I assume I will probably being come to AN with the same problem one day down the road. lol
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    Do you supervise them, or is "team leader" more of a figurehead role? If not, try discussing it with them directly first (good luck :/). If that doesn't work, document and go to the supervisor. In the meantime, if it's making you hate your job, look for a place without the "me" in team. Ha. You may get nowhere with your supervisor, but I think it's the right thing to do if their behavior impacts patient care. By the way, this thread is not "RNs vs LPNs" or hostile towards LPNs in general. I'm an RN, and if I saw a thread about how to deal with lazy RNs, I wouldn't be offended. Maybe that's because I'm not lazy.
    cbsncmom and TJ'sMOM like this.
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    I have found that there are only 3 things to be done, and you kind of need them to be done in order. One, work your a$$ off. Let it be seen that you yourself are not lazy. Two, communicate with the offenders what you expect and don't do it in the form of a question or a choice. Just say it. "I expect you to have your patient cleaned up before you go on another smoke break." Or, "I need to get out of here on time, make sure you can go on time as well." Three, if behavior doesn't improve, document objectively with real numbers and events, and pass it up the chain. Repeat as necessary. If offender questions you about the documentation, respond with "yes, and you were aware it was a problem because I spoke to you about it prior to writing anything down."

    I don't know any other way to do things. People will be the way they want to be, and some folks just don't want to work.
    Fiona59, itsmejuli, and rkealy like this.
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    Quote from BrandonLPN
    In LTC, we LPNs *do*assess each and every shift. It is silly to pretend otherwise. Sometimes I work with no RN and am the only nurse. So OF COURSE I assess. People try to come up with absurd word games like "data gathering" but it is the SAME thing.
    Of course LPN's assess but legally, only the RN can make the claim. I always hated that as well when I was a LPN. You do all of the foot work and the RN takes a peak and calls whatever shots. Unfortunately, it's all about the legalities.
    ohmeowzer RN and TJ'sMOM like this.
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    This, you need to stop asking, and start telling. No need to be rude. Just direct.
    Quote from Indy
    I have found that there are only 3 things to be done, and you kind of need them to be done in order. One, work your a$$ off. Let it be seen that you yourself are not lazy. Two, communicate with the offenders what you expect and don't do it in the form of a question or a choice. Just say it. "I expect you to have your patient cleaned up before you go on another smoke break." Or, "I need to get out of here on time, make sure you can go on time as well." Three, if behavior doesn't improve, document objectively with real numbers and events, and pass it up the chain. Repeat as necessary. If offender questions you about the documentation, respond with "yes, and you were aware it was a problem because I spoke to you about it prior to writing anything down."

    I don't know any other way to do things. People will be the way they want to be, and some folks just don't want to work.
    mizfradd and navyguyhm3 like this.
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    Quote from giveface
    I am the charge nurse responsible for a busy unit with a team model and I encounter this on almost a daily basis, as do many of the other RNs in charge. It really disgusts me how SOME of the LPN staff members can be so lazy and be grudge me because I have a pile of paper work and things to coordinate or otherwise over see in the nurses station, while still finding time to help many patients on the floor. These LPNs can't appreciate the level of stress and responsibility that goes onto the charge nurse, particularly after hours when we are the go to person for policy questions and issues. I would love for one day see these staff members just try and run the unit; they would crash and burn and panic in any emergency where they had to make decisions.
    Why are you assuming that other nurses would "crash and burn?" Charge roles are extremely busy, but many people are well suited for these roles, including *gasp* some LPN's. Perhaps some of these people might even be more suited for a charge role than you think.
    LPN2RN2013, Fiona59, ktwlpn, and 5 others like this.


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