False accusations. - page 5

by Capp 9,726 Views | 59 Comments

I work as an LPN at an assisted living facility while I'm in school to be an RN. I got a call over the radio Sunday that a grumpy family member wanted to complain to someone about his father's care (something that had nothing... Read More


  1. 0
    poor tyvin lol...crushed her thoughts
  2. 1
    An emergency is an emergency, plain and simple. When an unexpected emergency happens, then you can not have time to think about "welll I should tell Grumpy first that I am needed in another room...." Unfortunate for the CNA, who I hope did not get seriously hurt--however, I am sure your CNA will attest to when it was that you arrived to the room. Patients' families need to realize that their loved one is in a nursing facility, not the Ritz Carlton. And that daddy didn't get shaved today needs to take a back seat to one of your CNA's on the floor with a patient with broken legs on top of her. And if your administration doesn't support this I would find somewhere else to work.
    LTCNS likes this.
  3. 0
    We like to joke that it's not "right to work" but the "right to get fired."

    Anyhow, the only negative is the 30 minutes for EMT/ambulance to arrive. It seems heinous that it would take 30 minutes for them to come for two severely broken legs. The response time for an ambulance to arrive on calls should be within 6-8 minutes (better if it is even less - below 5 minutes). "The price of just a few seconds lost: People die" USATODAY.com

    I do 100% agree with the prioritization of the person with the broken legs (common sense, really!!! ), but why is the EMT/ambulance in your city so slow (30 minutes to arrive)?
    Hopefully with this health reform, we can get this fixed. There obviously needs to be more funding for medical response care (especially in your area) and cut this time down with improvement.


    Quote from iluvivt
    Well anyone can sue but since all states but one are work "at will" they can fire you for almost anything. Is this in the US? Most employers will try to protect themselves nonetheless and slowly build a case against you unless the offense is so egregious it speaks for itself. Also if you are in a protected class the employer seems to be a bit more cautious.

    I thought your response was totally reasonable and human. It is normal to be upset and angry when someone lies about you trys to destroy your reputation and make your life difficult. Are you supposed just take it...I think not. Any manager that cannot really gather the facts and see what really happened here and then do the right thing is a coward. Had you taken care of the man complaints first then you really would have violated the standard of care in this situation. If possible give families as little information as possible. I would have just said I was busy with an emergency. I know that in close quarters this can be impossible sometimes but the less information they have the less they can try and twist and use against you.
  4. 0
    OP you did the right thing. You were paged to an emergency and were focused (appropriately) on that. There was no time to stop and let the family member know, because your patient/resident needed your full attention NOW and you gave it to them. Job well done. You listened to the family member when you were able, and it is not your fault that he refused to acknowledge that an event happened between the time you said you would speak to him and the time you were able to get there.
  5. 3
    OP, you were right on the money.

    BTW, anyone seen tyvin?
    monkeybug, morte, and NutmeggeRN like this.
  6. 0
    OP good for you. I have had parents make up things about me when i was a pediatric nurse because as a charge I sometimes had to be the bad guy. Once in a while managers do take thier sides. However in your situation, i doubt any manager with 2 brain cells to rub together will think you should have dropped it all to listen to some whining. You have your witnesses and your charting which is your legal document. There will also be the 911 recording/log of when that was called, and as the nurse you can't just leave his side..HE HAD 2 BROKEN LEGS OMG. I have to just LOL thinking of the idiot family member...Narcissist much?

    AngelfireRN...i was thinking the same thing. She has no idea the anger she drew with her remarks.

    OP...i have left work many times in tears, I have been a nurse for nearly 2 decades (graduated in 94) and still have issues...my worst professional year was this last year...horrible!

    LVN's are just (beat me if you wish) nurses who have more on the job training then classroom. I have always felt that if you took core classes and had REALLY good preceptors you could learn nursing as a whole ON THE JOB. Beleive me when i say..i spent my first years in a clinic raising my babies...started working in a hospital nearly 9 yrs after graduating...i was worse then a new grad...if it hadnt been for a good 3 month orientation with a fantastic preceptor i'd have fallen on my face. Its 10% book, 90% sweet blood and tears to be a nurse...atleast A GOOD nurse.

    Well done OP.
  7. 5
    Meh, brush it off. I have literally had patients yell at me because it took too long to get their kiddo tylenol....AS WE ARE ACTIVELY CODING A PT! We tell them we are dealing with an emergency and well they simply dont care. Its all about me me me this day and age. Get used to it, its only getting worse.
  8. 8
    Quote from InfirmiereJolie
    We like to joke that it's not "right to work" but the "right to get fired."

    Anyhow, the only negative is the 30 minutes for EMT/ambulance to arrive. It seems heinous that it would take 30 minutes for them to come for two severely broken legs. The response time for an ambulance to arrive on calls should be within 6-8 minutes (better if it is even less - below 5 minutes). "The price of just a few seconds lost: People die" USATODAY.com

    I do 100% agree with the prioritization of the person with the broken legs (common sense, really!!! ), but why is the EMT/ambulance in your city so slow (30 minutes to arrive)?
    Hopefully with this health reform, we can get this fixed. There obviously needs to be more funding for medical response care (especially in your area) and cut this time down with improvement.
    I am not sure what area you work in......or if you deal with the transfer of patients to other facilities....or work in pateint care areas at all.......but in any area when a patient is to be transferred out of a facility to another....even if they are coding......after calls are made, there is paperwork that is required to be filled out...med sheets to be copied...things that need to eb done.

    Even If they use 911.....this paperwork must be completed before the patient leaves the facility or be subject to fines and removal from CMS approval/accreditation....are in violation of federal COBRA laws (anti-dumping)....state regulations....etc.

    The ambulance may be there in less time but to pack stabilize immobilize, complete copies of chart and paper work and out the door in 30mins.....deserves a standing ovation.
  9. 0
    In the big city and larger suburban areas yes, the response time should be quick....I live in a rural area (my town has 24/7 EMS with a paramedic/firefighter

    Many town rely on volunteers and there are large geographical areas to cover so response time is slower
  10. 0
    I don't think the OP meant it took 30 min for the ambulance to get there. The 30 min was referring to the "grumpy family member" who complained because he had to wait 30 min for the nurse to deal with the resident on the floor with two broken legs. Even a medical lay person knows that a broken leg is serious and that he should just shut up and stay out of the nurse's way. There was no excuse for a human being acting the way this family member did. Hopefuly the OP's employer treated the "complaints" about the wait time with the complete disregard they deserved.


Top