Doctor Hassles - pg.2 | allnurses

Doctor Hassles - page 3

Let me start off by saying I avoid this "nurse practitioner" like the bubonic plague. This "individual" constantly insults all nurses, myself included. This nurse practitioner is rude,... Read More

  1. Visit  SleeepyRN profile page
    6
    I can understand the consertivive treatment the NP prefers for this patient. However, as someone else stated, it is the manner in which the NP is speaking that appears to be the problem. Instead of being so flippant, she could briefly educate the nurse (OP) on her rationale for her treatment of choice. It sounds like it could have been a great educational opportunity. We as nurses have to know why we are treating a patient the way we are right? I can imagine a family member crabbing at the nurse "why aren't you doing anything." In this case the nurse can only think to herself "um, because the NP said so." While instead she could learn the NPs rationale and then explain it to the family. I also take issue with the NP saying "he's half dead anyway." How crass. We may *think* these things, but holy cow, we don't SAY them!
  2. Visit  Vespertinas profile page
    3
    Quote from ThislittleoneRN
    The physician who she works under is just as bad as she is.
    I see that a lot. Either the MD advocates for their hire because they get along in the first place or the NP learned the style from the attending. Either way, rock and hard place.
  3. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    2
    Quote from BostonFNP
    It seems like you have deeper seeded roots than this one interaction, and it is clearly effecting your working relationship. All else aside, I would suggest sitting down and having a direct talk with him/her: it may be bet for both you and the patient.

    A few questions, why the quotes around nurse practitioner? Is he/she a NP or not?
    I have worked with "so called" professionals who proclaim they actually went to school for medicine do I get the "nurse practitioner" quotes as emphasizing that the OP believes they are a "so called" professional.

    I too have worked with "professionals" that claim they "know" what they are doing along with that disparaging tone that is used to supposedly indicate strained tolerance and impatience....for they are far too busy and educated to be bothered by a lowly nurse.

    OP.....I would try to engage them....see what makes them tick. I would have this conversation in front of my manager to prevent a "he said she said" situation with you being on the loosing end of that conversation for I know this type to usually be vengeful and insecure.

    When all else fails.....I would do what you did...go around them.
    uRNmyway and prnqday like this.
  4. Visit  NurseDirtyBird profile page
    3
    I had a provider like this who refused to speak to the floor nurses, and he was the medical director. Didn't matter if it was after business hours and we had a problem, if the floor nurses called him, our answer would be, 99% of the time,
    "Don't call me for this (his favorite expletive), I don't have time. Send them out if you're so freaked out about it."
    We ended up sending out an inordinate amount of patients to the ER, most of whom could have been easily treated in house. Of course this started messing with the facility's reimbursements. When the money started talking, our usually do-nothing supervisors decided to step in. The DNS and managers had a meeting with the medical director, and suddenly he was happy to treat issues in house, after hours, with no problem.
  5. Visit  prnqday profile page
    1
    Quote from NurseDirtyBird
    I had a provider like this who refused to speak to the floor nurses, and he was the medical director. Didn't matter if it was after business hours and we had a problem, if the floor nurses called him, our answer would be, 99% of the time,
    "Don't call me for this (his favorite expletive), I don't have time. Send them out if you're so freaked out about it."
    We ended up sending out an inordinate amount of patients to the ER, most of whom could have been easily treated in house. Of course this started messing with the facility's reimbursements. When the money started talking, our usually do-nothing supervisors decided to step in. The DNS and managers had a meeting with the medical director, and suddenly he was happy to treat issues in house, after hours, with no problem.
    Love it! Money Talks.
    NurseDirtyBird likes this.
  6. Visit  redhead_NURSE98! profile page
    3
    Quote from NurseDirtyBird
    I had a provider like this who refused to speak to the floor nurses, and he was the medical director. Didn't matter if it was after business hours and we had a problem, if the floor nurses called him, our answer would be, 99% of the time,
    "Don't call me for this (his favorite expletive), I don't have time. Send them out if you're so freaked out about it."
    I like to write quotes like that directly into my nurse's notes. Our notes print out on the 1-2 page "daily progress" sheet for each patient. They very much enjoy seeing their words in print at the bottom of the page. So does the chief of staff.
  7. Visit  redhead_NURSE98! profile page
    2
    Quote from ThislittleoneRN
    Let me start off by saying I avoid this "nurse practitioner" like the bubonic plague. This "individual" constantly insults all nurses, myself included. This nurse practitioner is rude, unprofessional, and let's be honest, not very good at her job.
    Wait, I think I recognize this person. Do they spend time on allnurses.com?

    All kidding aside, the comment "just as useless as every nurse I've worked with" violates behavioral standards and should be written up as such and complained about. I don't work to be abused.
    ThislittleoneRN and Aurora77 like this.
  8. Visit  uRNmyway profile page
    0
    Quote from redhead_NURSE98!
    I like to write quotes like that directly into my nurse's notes. Our notes print out on the 1-2 page "daily progress" sheet for each patient. They very much enjoy seeing their words in print at the bottom of the page. So does the chief of staff.

    Yup, done that too. Didn't need to be done more than once either. When the other MDs reviewed the notes for last 24 hours and saw this, it didn't take long for it to get to the Dean of MDs for the hospital. He had to formally apologize to me for his behavior. Love seeing a grown man swallow his pride and apologize to the 'lowly nurse'! :P
  9. Visit  samadams8 profile page
    1
    Quote from redhead_NURSE98!
    I like to write quotes like that directly into my nurse's notes. Our notes print out on the 1-2 page "daily progress" sheet for each patient. They very much enjoy seeing their words in print at the bottom of the page. So does the chief of staff.
    LOL, as long as those are truly exact quotes and are not given out of context, I personally have NO problem with it. What does bother me are those quotes that are somehow misquoted or taken out of context. This can cause big problems. The bottom line is the practitioners, docs, as well as nurses should be carefully of what they say and how they say it, and then document their own quotes in case of conflict. But you don't want to get into some kind of quote wars. That's ridiculous too.

    The NP's comment about nurses was idiotic, and it colored the whole interaction. On top of that, at least in context with the OP, it sounds like she or he (don't remember) didn't really give a damn. If she wanted to practice conservatively, she should have explained her rationale, b/c most nurses do really care about what's going on with their patients, and she should have taken a better attitude and tone. She doesn't sound like she has a cooperative spirit, and this in my opinion is primarily her problem to straighten out--only, for the nurses and patients, it becomes their problem as well.
    ThislittleoneRN likes this.
  10. Visit  ThislittleoneRN profile page
    0
    Quote from samadams8
    LOL, as long as those are truly exact quotes and are not given out of context, I personally have NO problem with it. What does bother me are those quotes that are somehow misquoted or taken out of context. This can cause big problems. The bottom line is the practitioners, docs, as well as nurses should be carefully of what they say and how they say it, and then document their own quotes in case of conflict. But you don't want to get into some kind of quote wars. That's ridiculous too.

    The NP's comment about nurses was idiotic, and it colored the whole interaction. On top of that, at least in context with the OP, it sounds like she or he (don't remember) didn't really give a damn. If she wanted to practice conservatively, she should have explained her rationale, b/c most nurses do really care about what's going on with their patients, and she should have taken a better attitude and tone. She doesn't sound like she has a cooperative spirit, and this in my opinion is primarily her problem to straighten out--only, for the nurses and patients, it becomes their problem as well.
    I love your response! This practitioner doesn't give a damn and not one nurse wants to deal with her at all!... it's actually a pretty sad situation, especially for her patients.... Luckily, she doesn't have many at our facility anymore.
  11. Visit  BostonFNP profile page
    1
    I have hemmed and hawed about responding but I feel inclined to from the other side of this experience.

    This has really become a question of a chicken vs the egg. Was the NP initially rude to a nurse or was a nurse disgruntled about the NP's plan being different from theirs? It doesn't matter: the fact if the matter here is both sides are wrong. Both sides are perpetuating a downward spiral in work relationships.

    Can the OP honestly say this interaction wasn't jaded by the "other" nurses wide spread dislike of this provider? Is anything really solved by nitpicking and ultimately making this NP apologize? All would be best served, including the patient, if conflicts were resolved rather than escalated.

    Did the NP make some off-color comments? Sounds like it. Which one of you can say you NEVER have?

    As far as the quotes around "nurse practitioner", despite the fact you don't like her or think you know more than her (an perhaps you do), it doesn't change the fact she is board certified, in the end is it more than just petty and disrespectful?
    Altra likes this.
  12. Visit  samadams8 profile page
    0
    Of course, we don't know, b/c we weren't there. In this instance, I am giving the OP the benefit of the doubt. Read her initial post/description. Read the comment that was negative and condescending of nurses in general. This colored the interaction and reflects her attitude and bias. If you give the OP the benefit of the doubt, and read what was said, it's a no-brainer. Also, in order to enhance a team spirit and cooperation, every decent physician and practitioner or PA I know gives sound rationale to a nurse in charge of the care of a patient(at least this has pretty much always been my experience), unless there is an emergency. It shows respect, and again, it helps to foster support and cooperation.

    The NP in the story was condescending and presented as if she couldn't be bothered--if not with the patient, certainly with the nurse, who was concerned about her patient.


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