Different Lingo Depending where you practice nursing Different Lingo Depending where you practice nursing - pg.2 | allnurses

Different Lingo Depending where you practice nursing - page 2

Just got off the phone with a friend who is a nurse and she was telling me of her last shift. She was talking about K riders, where I work we call it potassium replacement. I hadn't heard about... Read More

  1. Visit  BacktotheBeach profile page
    0
    prn adapter=hep lock or saline well. Recently heard the adapter term for the first time and was puzzled.
  2. Visit  LynM75 profile page
    0
    Quote from superV
    prn adapter=hep lock or saline well. Recently heard the adapter term for the first time and was puzzled.
    They call those I-3's in my facility...III, intermittent intravenous infusion.
  3. Visit  amoLucia profile page
    0
    hey canned_ bread - I'm from central NJ. I say dwad-num. I only hear duo de num on TV. Viva la difference!
  4. Visit  rn/writer profile page
    4
    I had never heard a hospital gown called a johnny until I came to this board. I'm in the midwest, and every place I've ever worked or visited refers to that lovely, exposure-prone garment as a gown. Maybe some of the male patients rebelled against wearing something that sounds feminine in nature and came up with johnny to give it a masculine edge.
    jadelpn, nrsang97, cardiacfreak, and 1 other like this.
  5. Visit  RNKPCE profile page
    0
    cefazolin have heard it pronounced two ways sef-foz-o-lin and sef-ah-zoe-lin
  6. Visit  Aeterna profile page
    0
    In one of my nursing school placements, the nurses called dexamethasone by its generic name only, or "dex" for short (i.e. "Could you please get me 4mg of PO dex?") In my current workplace, 99% of the time, they seem to call it by its brand name, Decadron. Threw me for a bit of a loop when I started my job, haha!
  7. Visit  Keane68 profile page
    0
    Hi

    I wrote out this long letter back to you from your nice letter you sent to me about my daughter taking a breather or keep pushing through. I loved your letter about your daughter and I wanted to let you know. This site would not let me send it through private mail because I have not been on here long enough. I hope you receive this. Jim
  8. Visit  klone profile page
    0
    In OB, calling a woman "fully" instead of calling her "complete" (i.e. 10 cm dilated)

    In Colorado, a saline lock is called a "buff cap". The first time someone was orienting when I moved out here, the nurse said something about "buff capping" her IV and I was all "Whaaa?" She had only lived and worked and studied in Denver, so she wasn't aware it wasn't called that everywhere. Apparently a particular cap for saline locking an IV was invented at UCDenver Medical school, and their mascot is the Buffaloes (Buffs, for short). So that's that.
  9. Visit  toomuchbaloney profile page
    0
    How about the "cabbage" crashing in room 12?
    or the "prime ip" stalled in 14?
    does anyone call nervous mom's of pedies hover rounds? hover crafts? "helicopters" or "hummingbirds?
    have you ever heard the term "crackempractor" for a chiropractor?
    is "circling the drain" an old school phrase?
    we all have "walkie talkies", right?
    surely we all "turf" patients to other departments.
    Last edit by toomuchbaloney on Mar 26, '14
  10. Visit  klone profile page
    1
    Quote from toomuchbaloney
    or the "prime ip" stalled in 14?
    Are you talking about OB? I'm pretty sure primip is used everywhere, it's shorthand for primiparous (although that's a misnomer, because she's actually a primigravida, not a primip, as she hasn't actually had the baby yet). I guess "primip" sounds better than "primig"
    RunnerRN2015 likes this.
  11. Visit  RNKPCE profile page
    0
    Yes Jim I did receive it. Wish your daughter luck in her career!
  12. Visit  toomuchbaloney profile page
    0
    Quote from klone
    Are you talking about OB? I'm pretty sure primip is used everywhere, it's shorthand for primiparous (although that's a misnomer, because she's actually a primigravida, not a primip, as she hasn't actually had the baby yet). I guess "primip" sounds better than "primig"
    Perhaps the "where you practice" in the title of the thread refers to specialty as well as geography.

    That aside, did you feel that I was likely unaware of the meaning when I used it as an example? Just curious given you seemed to have a need to say something about it. I see that you are experienced in OB, perhaps you were simply demonstrating your familiarity with the "word".
  13. Visit  Here.I.Stand profile page
    0
    toomuchbaloney-- we use "circling the drain." I've heard "cabbage" used a lot, except the hospital where I worked in the CVICU the procedure was referred to as a "CAB," pronounced "cab."

    KCl supplements are called "bumps."

    "Bump" also is a verb for transfer to the trauma or cardiac stepdown. I've only heard that where I work now.

close
close