Denied employment at agency due to ordered prescriptions - page 3

by RNwithHonors 20,897 Views | 72 Comments

Hello everybody. First of all I would like to say I think this website is great. I've been using it throughout RN school, and recently I decided to make an account after getting my RN License. So, here is some back ground... ... Read More


  1. 4
    The only way the Americans with Disabilities Act would come into play here is if there were reasonable accomodations that the employer could make that they are refusing to. There is no reasonable accomodation in nursing for testing positive for benzos if the employer policy is to not hire those with a positive drug screen for any reason. Being on narcotics for anxiety and pain are not protected disabilities, particularly not in nursing, in which the potential for impairment is high. I think pursuing this legally would be expensive and futile. Best to move on and find an employer who isn't quite so uptight.
    kids, Zookeeper3, roser13, and 1 other like this.
  2. 1
    I know that the biases of Employers such as the one who previously denied me employment
    are secondary to the long documented history of FAR TOO MANY RN's who were in fact impaired while
    at work. I mean, for heavens' sakes: look at the CA BRN for the month of March alone in the disciplinary
    actions portion of their website (so many poor examples of RN's who get high at work, false documenting and stealing meds etc)

    It's a bit of a culture shock to me, as in all of my years in pharmacy I have never stole any medication..
    Not even a single Claritin! lol

    But I digress..

    I guess it's always seemed common sense to me that to work with a patient
    I must have a clear and sharp mind. (whether in pharmacy or nursing)

    Metaphorically speaking: I never drink and drive because I dont want to die or harm any others; I never ingested prescribed psychoactive substance while working with patients because I care for them and their well being..

    However, after the 30 year+ Epidemic of RN Drug Abuse... I don't blame any institution who is "uptight"
    in their selective process.. Hypervigilence naturally develops after recurrent trauma (RN administrators are people too).

    Again I don't blame the hospital, I see the bigger picture.

    Btw, I will be happy to let you know once I'm lucky to get my first RN job. = )
    Im applying "hypervigilantly" ; )
    Meriwhen likes this.
  3. 2
    it really does seem unfair. years ago, you would have just been asked to provide prescriptions for any meds that showed up on your test. this day and age, it seems like they can bounce you for just about any reason.
    nursel56 and RNwithHonors like this.
  4. 3
    Why not stop taking them? I wouldn't hire someone on benzos either. Jus sayin.
    SionainnRN, Susie2310, and RNsupermom99 like this.
  5. 24
    Quote from bluedevil,dnp
    why not stop taking them? i wouldn't hire someone on benzos either. jus sayin.
    hmmm...i guess we shouldn't hire diabetics either. if their blood sugar spikes or bottoms out, their judgement could be impaired. wouldn't want to hire epileptics; if they seize they could inadvertently harm a patient. asthmatics/copders would be a bad bet too; they could get too sob to function...and what if they coughed all over a patient? yuck! someone with a cancer history could have a recurrence, and that would be too expensive for the hospital.

    really, we should just hire perfect people who have no physical or emotional issues. and if an employee does develop a problem, we should just kick him/her to the curb. there are plenty of young new grads to take their place.
    EquusAnonymous, CountryMomma, msjack, and 21 others like this.
  6. 2
    I'm not sure I'd go that far, lol. That said, it wouldn't surprise me if things continue to trend in that direction.
    It's a cold cruel world out there. If something were interfering with my ability to earn my livelihood, I'd modify whatever factors I could. Things that are beyond one's control are just that.
    Susie2310 and nurse2many like this.
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    some people are biased against people with red hair. so, if you had red hair, are you saying you'd shave it off or dye it? what if you were a minority in a predominantly white area? what are you going to do about your race? will you need to move to an area that's more diverse?

    perhaps the op has issues that are beyond her control, and that's why she needs the medication--so she can function like a normal person. surely an educated person like you, an np, understands that anxiety can be crippling. to just say "meh...just go off the meds" shows a lack of empathy and appreciation for how difficult life can be for people with anxiety issues.

    i guess i just get fired up about this because i worked in psych and saw how people got knocked around just because they had emotional problems.
    msjack, iluvivt, iceprincess492, and 12 others like this.
  8. 1
    Quote from OCNRN63
    Perhaps the OP has issues that are beyond her control, and that's why she needs the medication--so she can function like a normal person. Surely an educated person like you, an NP, understands that anxiety can be crippling. To just say "Meh...just go off the meds" shows a lack of empathy and appreciation for how difficult life can be for people with anxiety issues.

    I guess I just get fired up about this because I worked in psych and saw how people got knocked around just because they had emotional problems.
    THANK YOU, ocnrn!!!!! Could not have said it better myself! =P
    RNwithHonors likes this.
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    yes, if it meant getting a job I needed, I'd dye my hair. Odd question.

    I think I said, specifically, that I'd modify whatever factors I could. Race is not modifiable (except apparently for Michael Jackson, and look how well that turned out for him ) but yes, of course I'd move. I have no idea if the OPs medication regimen is modifiable, that's why I mentioned it. If it is holding her back, it might be worth exploring with her provider. I would, in her shoes. But I'm a problem solver, that's just the way I roll.
    Altra likes this.
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    B.D. DNP, let me first say that, I too, am aspiring to be an NP.

    While I get the problem-solving angle in your logic, I don't agree with the delivery of your message.

    And no, I'm not defensive by nature: look at all the previous criticisms I have already taken graciously.

    One thing that I have witnessed which astonishes me is the lack of tact-based communication of too many Nurse Practitioners.

    Granted, it's only out of a small pool of NPs, that I have witnessed communicate with these abrasive communication techniques, therefore I can't, and won't, criticize NP's everywhere.

    Do you really "roll" with problem solving?
    Is mental illness at all considered to have any genetic propensity in your professional opinion?

    I know you may remark in your next post followed by a defensive array of semantics (just like you did to the previous poster)

    But, if had you considered the potential genetic propensity of mental illness
    before you chose to post your initial statement: well, maybe your communication
    delivery style may have been geared with more tact & consideration....

    That being said Blue Devil,
    I collaborated with my provider and worked out a plan for adapting & surviving,
    even though it has affected my quality of life to some degree.

    You will be happy to know, I'm sure, that I start my first RN job on June 4th--as I finalized
    everything by passing my pre-employment physical today.

    Thank you for those of you who recall the person typing on the other end of your screen here
    is actually a human-being; thank you TRULY for your support.
    nursel56, iceprincess492, nuangel1, and 7 others like this.


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