Denied employment at agency due to ordered prescriptions - page 2

by RNwithHonors 20,446 Views | 72 Comments

Hello everybody. First of all I would like to say I think this website is great. I've been using it throughout RN school, and recently I decided to make an account after getting my RN License. So, here is some back ground... ... Read More


  1. 0
    I appreciate everybody's feedback. The best I can do is to adapt and move on with hopes of finding a different RN job soon.

    I am always very considerate as far as my surroundings are concerned, as I have never have taken medication while at work or clinical. (or the night before if I had clinical in the morning)

    Reason being: I care too much for my patients.

    Most of all, I thank those of you who expressed empathy.

    My prescriber, at my request, has reduced my already low doses so I can safely titrate down.
    I learned the hard way that some entities (school or employer) may be more or less conservative regarding these matters.
    Thank you for sharing..
    = )
    Respectfully,
    Your fellow RN
  2. 3
    Just wanted to say I'm sorry your first job offer ended that way -- I can imagine it must've been even more disappointing as it was unexpected that this doc could veto your job offer.

    Everything you go through teaches a life lesson - it took me a long time to come to terms with some of it. I'm sure you'll find someplace that values you, hang in there.
    RNwithHonors, ebear, and Esme12 like this.
  3. 6
    Happened to me too. My dream job down the tubes. Lesson learned. Don't disclose anything. They ask you to list your meds like it's no big deal. A negative drug screen comes back but then the employer pulls out the list you wrote and says, so what about these meds? It's a big farce when people tell you "as long as you have a legal RX, no problem". The nursing shortage is over. The days are gone when as long as you were an RN and breathing, you were hired. When I first graduated, I was offered jobs at every single hospital I applied to. I could be picky. I'm even thinking of applying at wal mart and Mcdonalds just to have a paycheck. Sad.
    koi310, Not_A_Hat_Person, ebear, and 3 others like this.
  4. 1
    Quote from RNwithHonors
    The situation is this...
    My final semester ended in December. I was literally sought out by the Director of the acute-care floor where I did my preceptorship to start working as soon as I had my RN License. I completed all the paperwork for hire, took the NCLEX in January & passed in 75 questions, and informed my other job, of 8 continuous years, that I would be moving on to be a newly employed RN.
    I can't add anything that hasn't already been said. I think you are wise to wean off your controlled substances, even though theoretically you shouldn't have to.

    But this is the second thread I have come across where someone makes a point of how they passed NCLEX in 75 questions as though this is something which should figure in hiring decisions or which should indicate the competence of the nurse. I'm really puzzled by this. Are nursing schools pushing this train of thought?

    I wish you good luck and hope you come back and post when you do find a great job!
    Susie2310 likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from stargazer88
    Happened to me too. My dream job down the tubes. Lesson learned. Don't disclose anything. They ask you to list your meds like it's no big deal. A negative drug screen comes back but then the employer pulls out the list you wrote and says, so what about these meds? It's a big farce when people tell you "as long as you have a legal RX, no problem". The nursing shortage is over. The days are gone when as long as you were an RN and breathing, you were hired. When I first graduated, I was offered jobs at every single hospital I applied to. I could be picky. I'm even thinking of applying at wal mart and Mcdonalds just to have a paycheck. Sad.
    Disagree. OP's test came back positive for benzo's. What if she hadn't disclosed her script? I suppose in this case the outcome is the same in either scenario, but I'm certain that in most cases, failure to disclose scripts can only lead to trouble.
  6. 2
    Quote from roser13
    Disagree. OP's test came back positive for benzo's. What if she hadn't disclosed her script? I suppose in this case the outcome is the same in either scenario, but I'm certain that in most cases, failure to disclose scripts can only lead to trouble.
    I agree. Either way the OP's test would have been positive...better the employer knew upfront about why than for them to be blindsided with it after the fact, because after seeing an unexpected positive they may not give the OP a chance to explain.

    And in most cases, the OP would not have had any problem with the positive if they knew she had a legit script for the meds. Unfortunately, different facilities have different standards regarding positives, and having a script isn't always bulletproof protection against disciplinary action

    OP: I hope you find something soon. Best of luck as you keep hunting!
    RNwithHonors and Zookeeper3 like this.
  7. 0
    they probably have a policy based on malpractice insurance company's contract with the hospital. In other words, you are a risk because you have the potential to be loaded when you work, take more than prescribed, steal from patients---Not that you would, but they have id'd you as a risk.
  8. 4
    The topic at hand is your use of controlled substances. Your grades in school, your school's treatment of your situation, how well you did in clinical, your job while in school, all had nothing to do with the fact that you tested positive and the employer chose to apply their own criteria to that fact.
    SionainnRN, Susie2310, kids, and 1 other like this.
  9. 6
    Didn't you know that nurses are superhuman and are never to be on controlled meds for any reason?
  10. 2
    I think you'll only get the answers you're looking for by consulting a lawyer who specializes in employment law, particularly the Americans with Disabilities Act.
    Last edit by Calder on Apr 24, '12 : Reason: clarification


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