Big bad nurse bully - page 3

by Canadian Princess

6,857 Views | 24 Comments

Do bullies have value in the workplace? I would love to know the answer to this! How do nurses deal with bossy, histrionic and narcissitic nurses who are harsh in their relating with coworkers but are more than competent nurses?... Read More


  1. 0
    I don't think Bullies start out that way most of the time. I've caught myself in what some call bullying from time to time- it is a slow to develpoe behavior that has its roots in frustration and powerlessness. I have a high standard of care for the patients on my unit. I get frusrtated when others don't share that standard and don't seem to care that thier lax care reflects on the unit as a whole- and therefore me. Management dosen't seem to grasp priorities in patient care and are not open to suggestions or concerns from staff. As a result- with no "real" power to change things for the better or correct problems that are compromising my patients I end up bullying. To all the managers out there- If you have skilled experienced staff that seem to be bullying- empower them to promote positive change rather than admonish them for trying to change things for the better byut but the wrong methods. I don't want to be a bully, but without any other options that is sometiimes the only way I can seek to advocate for my patients.
  2. 0
    to anne74 no job is worth being so sick as to not to be able to go to work it sounds like you've toughed it out long enough it's not good for your physical or mental health. RUN!!!!! Good Luck
  3. 0
    Quote from burn out
    where i work they make bullys the nurse of the year.mms (make me sick)


    bullies in nursing????
    some faculty members
    didn't do their job
    and weed-out these losers.

    nurses nurture
    remember??? :d
    i don't see
    where a bully fits into
    the roles of
    nurturer, healer, empath...

    some say
    all types
    are found in
    all professions.
    but i see a misfit
    with a bully nurse.
  4. 1
    I'll never understand why workplace harrassment/horizontal and vertical violence/bullying is tolerated in nursing. Usually, these individuals are not the best nurses, or even above average (after all, character does matter in an nurse) who do far more damage to the unit (low morale, turnover, call ins, etc) than could possibly be justified.

    When the unit bully in my last job, an inpatient dialysis unit, was made permanent charge nurse, the bullying went from bad to worse. After her favoriate target, an LPN, retired (prematurely), she singled me out - the newest RN. Two months later I realized I could not do this to myself and quit (the other employees are great and supported me - however, they and the manager just put up with the bully and no one ever stood up to her!).

    This was a year ago; since then, three (!) more nurses have come and gone. The unit has not been able to keep a new nurse in a decade (!) due to this individual, who is at best an average nurse (and this is not sour grapes; I would tell you if I thought she was good, because this might explain why they are keeping her). So why are they putting up with this?! Other than her constantly brown-nosing the manager, I wish I knew (imagine what this woman has cost the hospital in personnel turnover!) Unfortunately, she's the second youngest in the unit at 46 (the rest are 43-66. If she ever left or got fired, I'd be first in line to return.)

    Frankly, I'm afraid now to look for a new job - which I must, however - because I wonder who the horrible bully of that unit will be (they don't tell you in the interview that they have such a toxic employee....)

    DeLana

    P.S. An EAP counselor was brought in for a meeting regarding the bully and another nurse she harrassed viciously at that time; she must have considered this a hopeless case, 'cause she never came back for the follow-up meeting
    Last edit by DeLana_RN on May 16, '09
    showbizrn likes this.
  5. 1
    Quote from suanna
    I don't think Bullies start out that way most of the time. I've caught myself in what some call bullying from time to time- it is a slow to develpoe behavior that has its roots in frustration and powerlessness. I have a high standard of care for the patients on my unit. I get frusrtated when others don't share that standard and don't seem to care that thier lax care reflects on the unit as a whole- and therefore me. Management dosen't seem to grasp priorities in patient care and are not open to suggestions or concerns from staff. As a result- with no "real" power to change things for the better or correct problems that are compromising my patients I end up bullying. To all the managers out there- If you have skilled experienced staff that seem to be bullying- empower them to promote positive change rather than admonish them for trying to change things for the better byut but the wrong methods. I don't want to be a bully, but without any other options that is sometiimes the only way I can seek to advocate for my patients.
    I don't know if we share the same definition of "bullying". If you are telling slackers who are not doing their job to get with the program, I don't call this bullying. But if you are harrassing, intimidating and verbally abusing coworkers for no apparent reason - actually, being abusive with anyone - then I consider this unprofessional, unacceptable behavior.

    More power to you if you're being a patient advocate and not putting up with poor care, laziness, etc. But if you're truly a bully as typically defined... frankly, there's no excuse for this, ever (you can always go up the chain regarding problem employees. But if you bully, then you're part of the problem).

    DeLana
    areyoubullyme likes this.


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