Bedside manners - page 2

by violet_violet

2,739 Views | 21 Comments

What are some of your bedside manner tips?... Read More


  1. 5
    Put them at ease by not spilling the water pitcher all over their stuff while simultaneously dropping the phone on the ground and half tipping over the iv stand. It tends to to put the patients on edge. Which is the opposite of putting them at ease.
    ElSea, silverbat, Piglet08, and 2 others like this.
  2. 2
    Catzilla, stop talking about me. I can hear you. I haven't done that all week.
    ElSea and Catzilla like this.
  3. 5
    Sometimes I am convinced that the rooms are booby trapped!
    anotherone, lalopop86, BrandonLPN, and 2 others like this.
  4. 2
    Think before you speak. Maintain a verbal filter, and remember that silence is not always a bad thing.
    anotherone and whichone'spink like this.
  5. 1
    Treat every patient with respect, even if they don't reciprocate.
    Do-over likes this.
  6. 1
    As others have said, introduce yourself. I ask if they need the bathroom or any help before I start my assessment / med pass. I make sure they know they can use the call light OR call my phone directly for help and that I round hourly. On my initial visit/assessment, I ask how supper was, that way I can snag something from the pantry before everything is picked-over if they didn't get enough to eat.
    whichone'spink likes this.
  7. 3
    So far it seems most of you are talking about the hospital. I think LTC has it's own set of rules re:bedside manner. Obviously, introducing yourself would be kind of weird. In LTC it pays to be much more laid back. I joke around with the residents, even tease some of them. Sometimes we "gamble" on what their glucoscan reading will be. One guy who gets a bucket of pills every night jokes that I'm just throwing random pills at him. I always reply that I just choose which pills I think look pretty together. Or I say I'm just giving him the "leftovers". A particularly priggish NM overheard me one night and made a big thing out of it. I'm always puzzled by nurses who equate a sense of humor with unprofessionalism. In a LTC setting, what is to be gained by being so uptight and conservative? I think having a strict, ultra-professional bedside manner in LTC just puts the residents on edge....
    anotherone, Meriwhen, and ElSea like this.
  8. 0
    I completely agree with the first response And since I want to work LTC, Brandon's post reflects how I'd see myself being
    Last edit by ElSea on Aug 6, '12 : Reason: typo
  9. 1
    Brandon---your post just made LTC look all that much more appealing! I love joking with and teasing my patients! Having humor with patients makes your day and theirs brighter and more enjoyable!
    ElSea likes this.
  10. 0
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    So far it seems most of you are talking about the hospital. I think LTC has it's own set of rules re:bedside manner. Obviously, introducing yourself would be kind of weird. In LTC it pays to be much more laid back. I joke around with the residents, even tease some of them. Sometimes we "gamble" on what their glucoscan reading will be. One guy who gets a bucket of pills every night jokes that I'm just throwing random pills at him. I always reply that I just choose which pills I think look pretty together. Or I say I'm just giving him the "leftovers". A particularly priggish NM overheard me one night and made a big thing out of it. I'm always puzzled by nurses who equate a sense of humor with unprofessionalism. In a LTC setting, what is to be gained by being so uptight and conservative? I think having a strict, ultra-professional bedside manner in LTC just puts the residents on edge....
    It's kind of the same in psych with the long-term or frequent flyers, those who we know very well and we know would prefer a less formal approach going both ways (us with them, them with us). As long as rules aren't broken and the milieu isn't threatened, it's all good.


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